Young Preservationists

Millennials Take Cincy: Community Building Through Preservation

Posted on: April 28th, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

By Daniel Ronan, Program Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Credit: OTR A.D.O.P.T.
OTR A.D.O.P.T., Cincinnati Preservation Collective, and UC Preservation Action Network work together to clean out a building for affordable housing in the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood.

When I think of Cincinnati, I think about the Rust Belt. Growing up in the Northwest, I learned about the general decline of the Midwest as a center for American manufacturing, often a narrative of loss and economic devastation. When I visited Cincinnati in mid-March, however, I had the privilege of seeing an entirely different story.

It seems a little hackneyed at this point to say Cincinnati, or Cincy, is in the midst of a renaissance or renewal. But what is happening is a reflection of broader national trends. Millennials are flocking to places of community and history. As seen in places like Philadelphia, Buffalo, N.Y. , and Cleveland, one of the main ways millennials are getting involved in community building efforts is through historic preservation, which promotes economic stability and community identity.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

The National Register Rap: Meet the Minds Behind the Music

Posted on: February 10th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 2 Comments

 

Sam Crystal, Katie DeCecco, Nate Dawes, and Carol Vinatieri. Credit: Grumpy Group
Sam Crystal, Katie DeCecco, Nate Dawes, and Carol Vinatieri: the group behind the "National Register Rap"

When the National Register Rap dropped in early December 2013, it went "preservation viral" -- as in, everyone who's ever navigated the National Register (NR) process immediately recognized and shared the funny (and useful) video.

We caught up with the masterminds behind the rap -- Nate Dawes, Katie DeCecco, Carol Vinatieri, and Sam Crystal, all historic preservation students at the University of Mary Washington -- to learn how they put it together, what they'd like people to discover about the National Register, and what their personal plaques would say.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Young Preservationist Sara Delgadillo on Why Preservation Needs Diversity

Posted on: January 29th, 2014 by Aria Danaparamita

 

Preservationists from different backgrounds gather for the National Preservation Conference Diversity Scholars program. (L. to r.: Rosalind Sagara, Sara Delgadillo, Manuel Huerta.) Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation
Preservationists from different backgrounds gather for the National Preservation Conference Diversity Scholars program. (L. to r.: Rosalind Sagara, Sara Delgadillo, Manuel Huerta.)

Preservation can mean a lot of different things to different folks. For Sara Delgadillo, it’s about authenticity, community, and inclusivity. The 28-year-old San Fernando Valley native is a graduate student at the University of Southern California’s Heritage Conservation program, but she’s excited about what potential preservation has for her predominantly Latino community and for America’s diverse communities at large.

We met Sara at the 2013 National Preservation Conference that she attended as a Diversity Scholar, a program that seeks to support community leaders in preserving diverse historic sites and heritage. We asked Sara what she thought about being a young preservationist and where she thinks preservation is going. Here’s what she said.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

 

Daniel Ronan graduated from the University of Oregon Planning and Public Policy program and is now based in Chicago. Credit: Daniel Ronan
Daniel Ronan graduated from the University of Oregon Planning and Public Policy program and is now based in Chicago.

As a young person in preservation, Daniel Ronan has heard laments of how the field struggles with meeting modern demands. But he sees it differently.

The 24-years-old Portland, Ore., native was a Diversity Scholar at the 2013 National Preservation Conference and a planning and public policy graduate of University of Oregon. Now pursuing his path as an emerging preservation professional, he sees a bright potential, an energetic momentum for preservation. Millennials, he thinks, have the opportunity and ingenuity to bring the past forward. The key? Thinking of it in multifaceted terms, being open to innovative approaches, and refocusing on saving the local, community places that matter.

We caught him in the conference afterglow and got inspired by his excitement. Here’s what he had to say.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Young Preservationist Graham Coreil-Allen on Art, Place, and the "Urban Sublime"

Posted on: December 12th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

Graham Coreil-Allen. Credit: Graham Coreil-Allen.
Through his project New Public Sites, Coreil-Allen invites participants to experience what he calls the urban sublime: "the aesthetic and profound sense of place in an urban space otherwise so often neglected."

Many complain that preservation is growing old and outdated. Graham Coreil-Allen is here to break that misperception. Age 31, born in Galveston, Texas before moving to Tampa, Fla., Graham is an artist currently based in Baltimore, Md. His mission: creative placemaking.

His method may not be the traditional kind of professional preservation. Beyond the bureaucracies of landmarking or heritage listing, Graham has a more underground approach: art and social engagement. He works primarily on interactive, community-based projects that seek to “activate” public spaces, like walking tours of urban spaces, where participants engage with the built environment and reflect on issues like urban planning, development, and -- of course -- preservation.

We chatted with him to learn more about his avant-garde style of preserving collective heritage.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.