Young Preservationists

 

Preservation Expert, Steve Stier, mentors some of the students from SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps
Preservation expert Steve Stier mentors some of the students from SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps.

Located on the coast of Northwest Michigan, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore has long been a favorite vacation spot for families throughout the state. The picturesque shoreline area, named “The Most Beautiful Place in America” by ABC’s Good Morning America in 2011, boasts many attractions including wineries, water-sports, shopping and camping. But last month, a group of young people made this familiar June pilgrimage with a different kind of summertime activity in mind: historic barn preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Summer with HOPE Crew: Inspiring a New Generation of Preservationists

Posted on: September 4th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Juliana Glassco, HOPE Crew Intern

HOPE Crew workers and scaffolding at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area included repainting the exterior of the historic Peters building. Credit Mathew Grubel, HOPE Crew craft expert
HOPE Crew work at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area included repainting the exterior of the historic Peters building.

In late August, I traveled with the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s HOPE Crew staff to visit the National Park Service’s Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, just in time to congratulate a HOPE Crew made up of Student Conservation Association (SCA) corpsmembers on a job well done as they completed a two-month project in the recreation area.

The crew members, most of them current college students or recent graduates, spent their summer documenting, cleaning, stabilizing, and painting historic structures. They spent most of their time at Camp Ken-Etiwa-Pec (KEP), a former camp constructed by Boy Scouts of America in the 1930s.

I was able to catch up with a few of the tired but happy crew members to talk about what they are taking away from their experience. The corpsmembers learned firsthand that preservation work isn’t always glamorous; they removed a LOT of debris from some of the structures that have been vacant for a few years -- and they had fun doing it!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

From Nature to Needlework: How Woodlawn Connects Kids to History

Posted on: September 2nd, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Katherine Malone-France, Vice President for Historic Sites

Farm Campers did Farm Chores every morning, which included everything from bug squishing and weeding, to watering and harvesting. Credit Morgan Maloney
Farm Campers did Farm Chores every morning, which included everything from bug squishing and weeding, to watering and harvesting.

Before summer slips away, I’d like to share a little bit of seasonal magic with you, courtesy of Woodlawn/Pope-Leighey, a National Trust Historic Site in Alexandria, Virginia.

At the end of July, I had the pleasure of attending a celebration marking the end of four weeks of Farm Camp at Arcadia Farm at Woodlawn. Arcadia Farm is located at Woodlawn, and is operated by the Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp. Credit: HistoricalGood.org
Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp.

For a group of teenagers in Southborough, Massachusetts, summer vacation came with a mission: saving a 167-year-old mansion.

Known as the Burnett/Garfield House, the Second Empire-style stone structure at 84 Main Street was built c. 1847 as the home of businessman Joseph Burnett and his wife, Josephine. Burnett, an active town leader, created the first liquid vanilla extract commercially produced and sold in the United States.

When it was reported earlier this summer that the mansion’s current owner was considering selling it to a developer who would seek demolition, a group led by local teenagers Bridget Brady, 14, and Jen Fox, 15, rallied to save the 2 ½-story structure, which requires sizable repairs.

“Everything else is fixable,” Brady says, “but demolition isn’t.”

Late last month, in the wake of the group’s protests, the current owner decided not to move forward on the sale. The story isn’t over, though. A full renovation is estimated to cost upwards of $1.5 million.

But given the outpouring of local support to save the house, led in large part by this group of teenagers, the future of the house looks significantly brighter.

We spoke with Bridget Brady, who’s starting her freshman year of high school this fall, about the history of the Burnett/Garfield House and why she felt compelled to save it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

First HOPE Crew Project Revitalizes 75-Year-Old Stable

Posted on: June 17th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 3 Comments

 

Credit: Susana Raab
Members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia helped rehabilitate the Skyland Stable, built in 1939, at Shenandoah National Park earlier this year as part of the National Trust's HOPE Crew initiative.

When a crew of young members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia arrived at Shenandoah National Park’s Skyland Stable back in March, they knew plenty about construction, but not much about historic preservation.

Less than three months later, however, the once-dilapidated stable looked much as it did when it was built in 1939, thanks to the young corpsmembers who trained alongside preservation professionals to conduct a large-scale rehabilitation of the property.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.