Women’s Heritage

 

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This 1998 statue, by Ted Aub, depicts the first meeting in 1851 between famed suffragettes, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, (who were introduced by activist Amelia Bloomer, depicted in the center).

Can you name 20 American historical figures that are women, excluding famous athletes, celebrities, and First Ladies? Most college students cannot, which isn’t surprising given that less than 5% of the content of history textbooks refers to women. On top of that, only 8% of sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places embody underrepresented communities, including women.

The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York aims to change that.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O’Connor is the member services assistant at the National Trust. She enjoys learning, writing, and talking about museums, art, architecture, and anything historic.

 

By Sophia Dembling

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Hetty Jane blasted the Great Pool out of granite as a swimming pool. It has several tiers of cascading water.

It all started with a little recreational trespassing.

"Everybody trespassed," says Jennifer Bigham. "Gazillions of people had done the same thing."

So she and her husband, just to satisfy their curiosity, climbed over a little fence to explore the ruins of Dunaway Gardens in Newnan, Georgia.

At first glance the property looked like little more than kudzu and swamp. But Bigham, who lives in nearby Peachtree City, saw magic.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

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Paul Robeson spent the last decade of his life in this West Philadelphia house after retiring from his show business career.

Scholar, athlete, singer, actor, civil rights activist. Paul Robeson, born in Princeton, New Jersey, in 1898, was a man who played many roles throughout his long life, gaining fame and recognition for his deep baritone voice and passionate acting in film and on stage. As a young man, he was only the third African-American student ever admitted to Rutgers University, earning a full academic scholarship and All-American recognition for his prowess on the football field. Later, his stage roles included Othello, both on Broadway and in a Royal Shakespeare Company production, and he starred in films like “The Emperor Jones,” “Proud Valley” and “Jericho.”

Robeson's strong support of anti-lynching legislation and stance against McCarthyism, as well as his affiliation with Communism, got him blacklisted in the 1950s. His career stalled after his passport was revoked and he could no longer travel abroad, and he spent the last decade of his life living with his sister and her husband in a modest house in West Philadelphia. He passed away in 1976, at the age of 77.

Thanks to the work of one woman, that house is now a vibrant community arts center. Frances Aulston has been working with the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, which owns and operates the house, since 1984. In recognition of her decades of service to the community and work with the Paul Robeson House, Aulston was recently honored by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. I spoke with her about her passion for Paul Robeson's house and legacy, and the neighborhood that he called home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

By Sophia Dembling

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When the Jessie Allen Wise Garden Club purchased the Excelsior Hotel in 1959, the ladies cleaned and furnished the neglected building themselves.

In the 1930s, a group of ladies started getting together to share recipes and gossip. They ended up saving a town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

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Left: A c. 1896 portrait of Emily Warren Roebling. Right: A sculpture at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge honors Emily, Washington, and John Roebling.

The first person ever to ride across the Brooklyn Bridge was the woman behind the man who built it: Emily Warren Roebling, wife of chief engineer Washington Roebling and a key figure in the great bridge's history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Sign the Pledge to Protect Villa Lewaro — And Learn How You Can Tour It

Posted on: October 24th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Spotlight on National Treasures: Villa Lewaro

The National Trust hosted several influential writers and bloggers from the New York City area in August 2014 to tour historic Villa Lewaro.
The National Trust hosted several influential writers and bloggers from the New York City area in August 2014 to tour historic Villa Lewaro.

Written by Jessica Pumphrey, Associate Manager, Public Affairs

In the course of all the Madam C.J. Walker stories this week, one word has come up more than any other: dream.

Walker called her home, Villa Lewaro, her "dream of dreams" -- the perfect phrase for a place that put her ingenuity, acumen, and hard work on display. And as this week's series shows, her influence continues to reverberate through history as she made history tangible for a writer, inspired an entrepreneur to start her own business, created a space for African-Americans to "do big things," and built a "monument" that speaks to the power of the American dream.

So now that you've experienced her remarkable legacy as well, maybe you have a dream of your own: to see Villa Lewaro in person. Here's how you can go one step further in making it happen -- and help save the estate at the same time.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.