Historic Bars

[Historic Bars] The Warren Tavern in Charlestown, Massachusetts

Posted on: November 26th, 2014 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: The Warren Tavern in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

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The Warren Tavern first opened its doors in 1780, five years after the Battle of Bunker Hill left Charlestown in ruins. 

The Warren Tavern’s charming address of 2 Pleasant Street in Charlestown belies its origin as a Revolutionary War haunt frequented by Paul Revere and George Washington. Established in 1780, the Tavern was one of the first buildings erected in Charlestown after the bloody Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, when British forces left the town in ruins. Among the colonial casualties was the tavern’s namesake, Dr. Joseph Warren, a physician and general who played an integral role in the American Revolution.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

[Historic Bars] Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans.

Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.

A powerful purple “voodoo” drink and a healthy dose of pirate history are just two great reasons to visit Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, located on New Orleans’ storied Bourbon Street.

Hailed as possibly the oldest bar in the United States and most definitely the oldest building currently in use as a bar, Lafitte’s is housed in a French-built structure that dates from roughly 1722 -- the details, like so much of New Orleans lore, are sketchy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] Hanover Tavern in Hanover, Virginia

Posted on: November 14th, 2014 by Lauren Walser No Comments

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: Hanover Tavern in Hanover, Virginia.

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Hanover Tavern has hosted a wide array of historical figures throughout its nearly three centuries in operation.

George Washington slept here. So did Lord Cornwallis, the Marquis de Lafayette, and Patrick Henry. Edgar Allan Poe and P.T. Barnum passed through its doors, as did Charles Dickens and Chief Justice John Marshall.

But Hanover Tavern isn’t one to name-drop. Its status as one of the oldest taverns (and one of the few surviving Colonial-era taverns) in the United States, though, certainly gives it bragging rights.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Historic Bars] The Old Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky

Posted on: November 6th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. First in line: The Old Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky.

The Old Talbott Tavern was originally built in 1779 and claims the title of the “world’s oldest bourbon bar.”
The Old Talbott Tavern was originally built in 1779 and claims the title of the “world’s oldest bourbon bar."

Come for the bourbon, stay for the ghosts.

The Old Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky, may be the world’s oldest bourbon bar and one of the earliest western stagecoach stops in America, but according to local lore, the 1779 inn is also haunted. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] The Owl Bar in Baltimore, Maryland

Posted on: October 30th, 2014 by Beth Lennon

 

Fans of the giggle water get to celebrate hooch in a big way this month as Preservation Nation covers blind pigs and juice joints -- a.k.a. speakeasies -- as part of our historic bars series. Next up: The Owl Bar in Baltimore, Maryland.

The nursery rhyme above the bar is a clue into the speakeasy past of Baltimore’s Owl Bar.
The nursery rhyme above the bar is a clue into the speakeasy past of Baltimore’s Owl Bar.

A wise old owl sat in an oak / the more he saw the less he spoke
The less he spoke the more he heard / why can't we all be like that wise old bird?

First-time visitors to the Owl Bar may be amused by the appearance of a nursery rhyme embedded in stained glass above the antique backbar at Baltimore’s landmark Belvedere Hotel. More than a quaint decoration, however, the rhyming couplet is actually a nod to the Prohibition-era legacy that the bar’s feathered mascots played a major part in.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.