11 Most Endangered

Houston Astrodome: Iconic Stadium Awaits "New Dome Experience"

Posted on: August 9th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

The Houston Astrodome. Credit: Ed Schipul, Flickr.
The Houston Astrodome: The world’s first dome stadium brought the future for professional sports to Houston, Texas.

The Houston Astrodome opened in 1965 with an exhibition game: Houston Astros versus New York Yankees. The crowd surely went wild. Houstonians claimed the ballpark the “eighth wonder of the world.”

And was it ever. The world’s first indoor domed stadium became the home of the Houston Astros (Major League Baseball), Houston Oilers (National Football League), and the world-famous Houston Rodeo.

Yet decades later, the seats are empty. No crowds. No sports. The Astrodome, named on our 2013 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places, faces potential demolition. But there’s new hope for one of the nation’s most spectacular ballparks.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

 

Written by Jessica Coscia

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Tropical hues on Spanish colonial homes of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico

I was five when we moved to paradise. Equipped with a couple of suitcases, my mother and I left our home in northern Virginia to embark on a new adventure in Puerto Rico -- “La Isla del Encanto” (The Island of Enchantment), with its picturesque white sand beaches, aqua blue ocean water, exotic animals, tropical climate, and the only rainforest in the United States.

It may seem worlds away, but Puerto Rico has been an American territory for over fifty years. And when I think of my own childhood there, I immediately remember the places and experiences there that helped shape who I am today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

No School Left Behind: Saving Montana's Rural Classrooms

Posted on: June 24th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The little school on the prairie. Rural schoolhouses, like this one in western Montana, may soon exist only in fiction.

Sandy Hart’s grandmother rode her horse to school. Out in rural Montana, wooden bell towers ring in the school day as the stars and stripes flutter atop lone flagpoles.

Tucked among mountains and prairies, these schoolhouses only have one or two classrooms. Yet steeped in the state’s homestead history, the rough hewn logs, clapboard, or cobblestone walls, are -- or were once -- a beacon for learning and community life.

Montana abounds with these one-and-two room schools built to educate children in the countryside. But these schools are getting, literally, left behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

The Abyssinian Meeting House: Maine's Untold African-American Heritage

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The Abyssinian is the third-oldest standing African-American meetinghouse in the U.S. (The first two are in Boston and Nantucket, MA.)

150 years ago, ships anchored and runaway slaves hurriedly disembarked on the Maine State Pier. They covertly walked up India Street onto Newbury Street to the Abyssinian Meeting House in search of help. There, in this humble house of worship, they found it.

The Abyssinian: where William Lloyd Garrison and, locals think, Frederick Douglass gave impassioned speeches while members of the congregation helped those on the Underground Railroad find their way to Canada -- and freedom.

As local preservationist David Paul claims, this was “the black history that nobody told.” ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Lighting the Coast and Heart: Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse

Posted on: June 20th, 2013 by Paulina Tam

 

Golden hour at Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse. Credit: adwriter, Flickr

Since its first christening in 1856, Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts -- one of the sites on our 2013 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places -- has lighted the passage home for ships and travelers returning from sea in the Atlantic Coast. It was and still is a celebrated artifact of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah, a Native American Tribe; the citizens of Aquinnah, Massachusetts; and the hearts of many outside visitors.

However, a much darker light has been casting its rays upon the historical lighthouse in recent years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.