11 Most Endangered

No School Left Behind: Saving Montana's Rural Classrooms

Posted on: June 24th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The little school on the prairie. Rural schoolhouses, like this one in western Montana, may soon exist only in fiction.

Sandy Hart’s grandmother rode her horse to school. Out in rural Montana, wooden bell towers ring in the school day as the stars and stripes flutter atop lone flagpoles.

Tucked among mountains and prairies, these schoolhouses only have one or two classrooms. Yet steeped in the state’s homestead history, the rough hewn logs, clapboard, or cobblestone walls, are -- or were once -- a beacon for learning and community life.

Montana abounds with these one-and-two room schools built to educate children in the countryside. But these schools are getting, literally, left behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

The Abyssinian Meeting House: Maine's Untold African-American Heritage

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The Abyssinian is the third-oldest standing African-American meetinghouse in the U.S. (The first two are in Boston and Nantucket, MA.)

150 years ago, ships anchored and runaway slaves hurriedly disembarked on the Maine State Pier. They covertly walked up India Street onto Newbury Street to the Abyssinian Meeting House in search of help. There, in this humble house of worship, they found it.

The Abyssinian: where William Lloyd Garrison and, locals think, Frederick Douglass gave impassioned speeches while members of the congregation helped those on the Underground Railroad find their way to Canada -- and freedom.

As local preservationist David Paul claims, this was “the black history that nobody told.” ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Lighting the Coast and Heart: Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse

Posted on: June 20th, 2013 by Paulina Tam

 

Golden hour at Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse. Credit: adwriter, Flickr

Since its first christening in 1856, Gay Head (Aquinnah) Lighthouse in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts -- one of the sites on our 2013 list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places -- has lighted the passage home for ships and travelers returning from sea in the Atlantic Coast. It was and still is a celebrated artifact of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah, a Native American Tribe; the citizens of Aquinnah, Massachusetts; and the hearts of many outside visitors.

However, a much darker light has been casting its rays upon the historical lighthouse in recent years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

 

North side of Sugar Pine Bridge. Half Dome is viewed through the trees at left rear.
North side of Sugar Pine Bridge. Half Dome is viewed through the trees at left rear.

Last year we added the bridges of Yosemite Valley to our 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list and our National Treasures portfolio out of concern for how the National Park Service’s plan to manage the Merced River would impact the historic Rustic-style stone bridges that span the river. Despite our ongoing advocacy efforts, earlier this year the National Park Service released a draft plan calling for the demolition of the beloved Sugar Pine Bridge and 100 other historic structures in the Yosemite Valley Historic District.

Photographer Brian Grogan generously agreed to share with us some of his gorgeous photos of Yosemite’s bridges and his thoughts about their importance to the park’s landscape. Take a minute to be dazzled by these bridges’ rustic simplicity, and then send a message to the National Park Service that urges their stewardship of these precious structures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

From Questions to Action: How Sweet Auburn Is Reviving Its Historic Community

Posted on: February 18th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Written by Teresa Lynch, Senior Program Officer, National Main Street Center

Streetscape in Sweet Auburn. Credit: Stan Kaady
Sweet Auburn

I consider myself privileged to be part of the National Trust’s National Treasure team working to preserve and revitalize one of the most significant historically African-American commercial areas in the South -- Sweet Auburn in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Sweet Auburn neighborhood is particularly distinct in that it was the birthplace of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It is where he was raised, worked, and worshiped, and it is where he is buried, within the 10-block Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site centered on Auburn Avenue. (It was also listed as one of our America's 11 Most Endangered Places in both 1992 and 2012.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Tips for Nominating Your Site to America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places List

Posted on: February 12th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Written by Sarah Coquillat, Public Affairs Intern

The National Trust’s America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list for 2013 will be announced this June, and we’ve got good news: There’s still time to nominate your favorite endangered site.

First, a little background. For the past 26 years, the 11 Most list has been one of the most effective tools in the fight to preserve our country’s irreplaceable architectural, cultural, and natural heritage. In the past, the list has spotlighted important places such as Nine Mile Canyon, TWA Terminal at JFK International Airport, and Little Rock Central High School.

Are there historic sites in your community or your state that you think would be good candidates for 11 Most? Then check out our top 10 tips for presenting a strong case when nominating your site. Good luck!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.