11 Most Endangered

[11 Most Endangered] Echoes of Jazz at the St. Louis Palladium Building

Posted on: July 21st, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

St. Louis’ contributions to American music reveal a legacy greater and more significant than previously understood, and the Palladium is a central part of this story. Credit: Paul Sableman
St. Louis’ contributions to American music reveal a legacy greater and more significant than previously understood, and the Palladium is a central part of this story.

"There are only three things America will be remembered for 2,000 years from now -- the Constitution, jazz music, and baseball," said renowned essayist and American culture critic Gerald Early in the 1994 Ken Burns documentary Baseball. "Those are the three most beautiful things this culture’s ever created."

If his belief proves true, it’ll be an excellent legacy. And if we take the Washington University in St. Louis faculty member’s adopted hometown as an example -- with the Constitution in relative safety and the hometown Cardinals a perennial World Series contender -- it seems we’d do well by our stars to focus on jazz a little bit.

Enter the St. Louis Palladium Building.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

The Underground Legacy of Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 9 Comments

 

Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013. Credit: Ron Cogswell
Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013

Just east of downtown Richmond, Va., on the banks of the James River, you’ll find a historic neighborhood of national importance: Shockoe Bottom. From the 1830s through the Civil War, the area was the site of one of the largest slave trades in the United States, second only to New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

[11 Most Endangered] Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: David Casteel
Mokuaikaua Church was built in 1837 by Hawaii's first Christian missionaries. 

The ohia wood rafters in the sanctuary of the Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, have been sheltering worshipers since 1837, when King Kamehameha II gave Hawaii's first Christian missionaries his blessing to build the structure just a stone's throw from the ocean.

Mokauikaua -- 177 years later -- has become immeasurably valuable in not only giving residents of Kailua-Kona on Hawaii’s Big Island a beautiful place to meet and worship, but also in helping to tell the state’s unique story. Pastor David de Carvalho, the 31st to serve at the church, estimates that it welcomes about 400 people every Sunday, an even split of regulars and tourists eager to experience a service in the Aloha State's oldest house of worship.

That’s why, in light of structural damage from a 6.6 magnitude earthquake in 2006 and a slew of problems due to typical wear-and-tear in Hawaii's tropical climate, the National Trust decided to grant the church a place on its 2014 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Credit: Alan C. Spector
Built in 1954, the Spring House's hemicycle design is considered the last architecture phase of Frank Lloyd Wright's career. 

In 1950, a woman by the name of Clifton Lewis sought out none other than Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home for her. And he did: the Spring House in Tallahassee, Florida. Despite its modest boat-like shape and rural location, the Spring House represented a significant point in Wright's career, attracted architect buffs from around the world, and was even involved with the Civil Rights movement.

Today, however, the house is slowly deteriorating from harsh weather conditions and neglect, and the day may come when the only private home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in the state of Florida no longer stands. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

A Farewell to South Dakota’s Human Services Center, a Past 11 Most Site

Posted on: June 24th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Jenny Buddenborg, Denver Senior Field Officer

Credit: Jenny Buddenborg, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Built in 1898 and listed on the National Register, the Lee building featured a load-bearing masonry exterior with a wood-framed interior. It was demolished instead of being reused for a different purpose.

So much of our work as preservation advocates places us in the role of influencing decisions but not necessarily having the power to make crucial decisions ourselves. This is particularly difficult when you are trying to save a threatened place that is not under your ownership or management.

Succeeding under these circumstances is immensely satisfying, but losing is tremendously frustrating. Just because you want something to happen and you put as much energy and resource into it as possible doesn’t mean it will. Ultimately, your priority may never become a priority for the people you try to persuade.

That is how I felt after recently losing nine of 11 historic buildings to the wrecking ball at the Human Services Center (HSC) in Yankton, S.D., after spending five years advocating alongside partners for their preservation and adaptive reuse.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.