11 Most Endangered

 

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Wildwood’s iconic and photogenic Caribbean Motel was the perfect location to host a gathering of vintage-loving guests.

Retro Roadmap hosted the first of what is hoped to be more Vintage Weekends, showcasing the mid-century motels and more of the shore town of Wildwood, New Jersey with a sold-out crowd attending from up and down the East Coast.

From the base camp at the iconic Caribbean Motel (built in 1957 by Lou Morey and listed on the National Register of Historic Places), the tiki-themed event combined vintage-inspired activities with modern social media sharing to increase awareness of and interest in the many facets of 1950s and ‘60s culture that still exist in this popular beach town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

After Remarkable Relocation, Historic Gay Head Lighthouse Shines Again

Posted on: August 12th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By Jenna Sauber

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The Gay Head Lighthouse was triumphantly reopened on August 11, 2015.

After 160 years of sea cliff erosion, the Gay Head Lighthouse in the town of Aquinnah on Martha’s Vineyard was literally a few dozen feet away from being lost forever to the Atlantic Ocean.

Two years of planning, paperwork, heavy labor, and $3.5 million later, island residents and visitors alike can sleep easily again under the sweep of the familiar Gay Head light. After an extensive relocation campaign this spring, the lighthouse reopened on August 11, a safe 130 feet farther inland where its red and white beacon is shining brightly once again.

A journey of 130 feet, however, required the help of an entire community. Here are just a few of the local preservationists who made this vision a reality.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Announcing America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places for 2015

Posted on: June 23rd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

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Grand Canyon, Arizona

Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation issued our 28th annual list of the America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

This year’s list helps underscore the ongoing effort we have at the National Trust to tell the story of our nation in all its richness and complexity. We want to see the history of all Americans honored and remembered, and to see all our families and communities reflected in the telling. As such, many of the sites on the 2015 list, our most diverse ever, focus on important chapters in our history that have sometimes been overlooked.

We officially unveiled the 2015 list in a video released today:

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

St. Louis’ contributions to American music reveal a legacy greater and more significant than previously understood, and the Palladium is a central part of this story. Credit: Paul Sableman
St. Louis’ contributions to American music reveal a legacy greater and more significant than previously understood, and the Palladium is a central part of this story.

"There are only three things America will be remembered for 2,000 years from now -- the Constitution, jazz music, and baseball," said renowned essayist and American culture critic Gerald Early in the 1994 Ken Burns documentary Baseball. "Those are the three most beautiful things this culture’s ever created."

If his belief proves true, it’ll be an excellent legacy. And if we take the Washington University in St. Louis faculty member’s adopted hometown as an example -- with the Constitution in relative safety and the hometown Cardinals a perennial World Series contender -- it seems we’d do well by our stars to focus on jazz a little bit.

Enter the St. Louis Palladium Building.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

The Underground Legacy of Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 9 Comments

 

Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013. Credit: Ron Cogswell
Richmond’s Shockoe Bottom district in 2013

Just east of downtown Richmond, Va., on the banks of the James River, you’ll find a historic neighborhood of national importance: Shockoe Bottom. From the 1830s through the Civil War, the area was the site of one of the largest slave trades in the United States, second only to New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

[11 Most Endangered] Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: David Casteel
Mokuaikaua Church was built in 1837 by Hawaii's first Christian missionaries. 

The ohia wood rafters in the sanctuary of the Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, have been sheltering worshipers since 1837, when King Kamehameha II gave Hawaii's first Christian missionaries his blessing to build the structure just a stone's throw from the ocean.

Mokauikaua -- 177 years later -- has become immeasurably valuable in not only giving residents of Kailua-Kona on Hawaii’s Big Island a beautiful place to meet and worship, but also in helping to tell the state’s unique story. Pastor David de Carvalho, the 31st to serve at the church, estimates that it welcomes about 400 people every Sunday, an even split of regulars and tourists eager to experience a service in the Aloha State's oldest house of worship.

That’s why, in light of structural damage from a 6.6 magnitude earthquake in 2006 and a slew of problems due to typical wear-and-tear in Hawaii's tropical climate, the National Trust decided to grant the church a place on its 2014 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.