Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp. Credit: HistoricalGood.org
Members of Historical Good, top row, from left: Kayleigh Travins, Margo Boland, Maggie Shoemaker, and Sophia Brady; bottom row: Bridget Brady. Not pictured: Jen Fox, who was away at camp.

For a group of teenagers in Southborough, Massachusetts, summer vacation came with a mission: saving a 167-year-old mansion.

Known as the Burnett/Garfield House, the Second Empire-style stone structure at 84 Main Street was built c. 1847 as the home of businessman Joseph Burnett and his wife, Josephine. Burnett, an active town leader, created the first liquid vanilla extract commercially produced and sold in the United States.

When it was reported earlier this summer that the mansion’s current owner was considering selling it to a developer who would seek demolition, a group led by local teenagers Bridget Brady, 14, and Jen Fox, 15, rallied to save the 2 ½-story structure, which requires sizable repairs.

“Everything else is fixable,” Brady says, “but demolition isn’t.”

Late last month, in the wake of the group’s protests, the current owner decided not to move forward on the sale. The story isn’t over, though. A full renovation is estimated to cost upwards of $1.5 million.

But given the outpouring of local support to save the house, led in large part by this group of teenagers, the future of the house looks significantly brighter.

We spoke with Bridget Brady, who’s starting her freshman year of high school this fall, about the history of the Burnett/Garfield House and why she felt compelled to save it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Juneau’s St. Nicholas Church: An Icon of Alaska’s History

Posted on: August 4th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church was built in 1894. Architectural plans, funds for construction, and interior furnishings were shipped from Russia. Credit: asmythie, via Flickr
St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church was built in 1894. Architectural plans, funds for construction, and interior furnishings were shipped from Russia.

What kind of architecture do you think of when you hear the phrase “Russian Orthodox?” Maybe massive St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow, its round, colorful spires reaching for the sky, or possibly the more modest, but still majestic, gold-domed houses of worship that dot cityscapes in the United States.

So what is a miniature version of one of these churches doing in Juneau, Alaska? The answer might surprise you.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Historic Real Estate: The Amenities Edition

Posted on: August 1st, 2014 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

blog_photo_Taos Adobe Home
This historic New Mexico adobe home was restored in 2001, and seamlessly combines the old and new both inside and out.

Taos Adobe -- Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Built in 1795, this four-bedroom, four-bathroom home is enveloped in culture and history. The High Road to Taos ends in Ranchos de Taos, where Spanish settlers first began to build homes in the late-18th century. With its thick adobe walls, hand carved railings, and a dining room fireplace designed for cooking over an open flame, this historic home transports you through time -- but also includes modern upgrades for comfort. And it doesn't stop there. Additional amenities include a separate one-bedroom casita, greenhouse, and root cellar. Price: $750,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

[Historic Bars] Prost! in Portland, Oregon

Posted on: July 31st, 2014 by Lauren Walser

 

PreservationNation continues its historic bars series with America’s takes on the beer-brewing bodegas that originally sprouted in the Fatherland. Today's last stop for this particular theme: Portland, Oregon.

The c. 1894 building at 4237 N. Mississippi Avenue had been boarded up and vacant for years before its restoration. Credit: Prost!
The c. 1894 building at 4237 N. Mississippi Avenue had been boarded up and vacant for years before its restoration.

It was the old-world, rustic charm that attracted restaurant owner Dan Hart to the modest, 120-year-old building on a street corner in Portland, Oregon’s historic Mississippi neighborhood.

But it’s the authentic German fare and liters upon liters of German beer that, today, draw thirsty Portlanders to Prost!, a friendly neighborhood beer garden.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

140730_blog_photo_415MSt_NTHP_CK
415 M Street NW, Washington, D.C., in the Mt. Vernon Square neighborhood

If you were to walk past 415 M St. in Washington, D.C., you’d probably think it was just another house in the Mt. Vernon Square neighborhood. But sometimes the simplest looking places have the most history within their walls.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She enjoys writing, spending time outdoors, and is a movie and music enthusiast.