Weekend Reads from CityLab, Atlas Obscura, Daily Mail, and More

Posted on: August 7th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

by Tim Mikulski

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Pershing Park at 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C. The park is named after John J. Pershing, the General of the Armies during World War I.
Pershing Park at 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C. The park is named after John J. Pershing, the General of the Armies during World War I.

“Late last year, Congress authorized a new National World War I Memorial for Washington, D.C. Just last month, that memorial took its first step toward becoming a reality. But there’s a hitch: The site that legislators picked out for the monument is already home to a World War I memorial. Predictably, the plan has sparked a skirmish over the best way to remember the War to End All Wars.” CityLab -- How Many World War I Memorials Does One Park Need?

“It has been submerged in water for more than 80 years. But now, following this summer's record drought, 60 per cent of Lake Mead has dried up, revealing entire buildings that disappeared decades ago. And tourists are flooding in. The reservoir -- America's largest -- is home to St Thomas, an Old West town which was lost in 1938 when the government built a dam to create a lake.” Daily Mail -- Astonishing drought unveils lost Wild West town that has been submerged under Nevada's Lake Mead for the most part of 80 years... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

150806_blog-photo_Sisson's-Fancy-Exterior
Orrin Sisson Home, aka “Sisson’s Fancy”

Orrin Sisson Home Seeks Lover of Second Empire Architectural Style

240 Sisson Street -- Romeo, Michigan

Antique? Hardly.

Classics never go out of style, and there’s nothing like an original. And I am an original; from my 24-foot pierced oak staircase with acorn finial to my hand-silkscreened wallpapers to my antique stove in the kitchen, you’ll find nothing but the real thing here.

150806_blog-photo_Sisson's-Fancy-interior
The Orrin Sisson House mixes classic, Second Empire-style with luxurious living.

Though I’m 138 years young and sport elegant, timeless features, I’m not without my modern touches such as granite kitchen counter tops and modernized electric, plumbing, and natural gas systems.

Besides that, I mix classic, Second Empire-style with luxurious living. You can have large gatherings with family and friends in my third-floor recreation room (complete with bar, fireplace, and a fabulous view of the neighborhood from the window) or opt for tranquil solace in the first-floor library.

I could tell you more, but what I have to offer has to be seen to be believed. Check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Fun Facts about Oregon Zoo’s Miniature Trains

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

150730_blog-photo_Centennial-and-Zooliner
The Centennial (left) and the Zooliner (right) at the Oregon Zoo

In the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we report on the restoration of the Oregon Zoo’s miniature trains, The Centennial and the Zooliner. These locomotives have been transporting visitors around the Portland-based zoo since they were installed in 1958 (Centennial) and 1959 (Zooliner). In June 2014, the miniature trains were sent to the Pacific Truck Centers in Ridgefield, Washington for restoration work. Here we share some more fun facts about these beloved attractions and their restoration.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Tuberculosis Sanitariums: Reminders of the White Plague

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 5 Comments

 

Written by Anya Grahn

150803_blog-photo_anya's-photos
Left: Consumptives playing in front of an open-air cottage at the Wisconsin State Sanitarium (circa 1940). Right: Mae Panzenhagen Strong in front of the Wisconsin State Sanitarium where she had been a patient (circa 1945).

For centuries, the white plague -- also known as tuberculosis (TB) or consumption -- was considered an ailment of the poor. The rich often escaped the embarrassment of the disease by retreating to European health spas, while the poor continued to suffer with no relief. As the Industrial Revolution brought more workers into crowded urban centers, the plague spread and no one was immune.

Bacteriologist Robert Koch’s germ theory in 1882 provided better insight into the disease, and lent itself to explaining the spread of tuberculosis. State and local anti-tuberculosis organizations led social movements to improve sanitary conditions through anti-spitting laws and health regulations; encouraged consumptives to seek medical treatment; and persuaded state and local governments to create a network of state and county hospitals that isolated consumptives.

These sanitariums mark the beginning of government-funded campaigns to address tuberculosis. At these sites, consumptives spent years seeking a cure through prescribed regimens of fresh air and sunlight. Located away from local urban populations, these self-sufficient medical complexes became isolated communities containing a series of buildings that provided housing for patients and staff, medical and administrative offices, utility plants, and other uses. While many of these structures have been lost, others have found new uses as housing developments, medical facilities, and even museums.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Historic Bars] The 1747 Pub in Annapolis, Maryland

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By Kirsten Hower

150805_blog-photo_Reynolds-Tavern-NR-sign
Originally a hat shop and an ordinary, Reynolds Tavern is now a quaint tea room and working tavern.

When someone offers to buy you a drink in a nearby basement, you typically worry. Especially if the basement belongs to a hatter, mad or otherwise.

The 1747 Pub is the exception to the rule.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Palace of the Governors: A Time Capsule of Santa Fe’s Diverse History

Posted on: August 5th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By Kirsten Hower

Indian Detours personnel group photo with Harvey cars lined up in front of Palace, c. 1926 - 1930.
Indian Detours personnel group photo with Harvey cars lined up in front of the Palace of the Governors, c. 1926 - 1930.

Located in the heart of downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Palace of the Governors is one of the oldest, in-use public building in the United States. Once the seat of power, the Palace now showcases the diverse and colorful history of Santa Fe and its peoples. This Exposure slideshow takes you on a virtual tour of this unique historic place.


Palace of the Governors by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.