[Historic Real Estate] Preservation Personals: The Old Jail Museum

Posted on: April 24th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

Today we are beginning a new installment of Historic Real Estate called “Preservation Personals.” Instead of our usual For Sale-style ads, we're letting the historic properties speak for themselves. First up ...

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The Old Jail Museum

Gothic Revival Gem Seeks to Lock Down a Daring, Savvy Investor

The Old Jail Museum -- Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania

Seeking a bold and unusual venture? Like a little bit of the strange and spooky? Then you and I will make the perfect team.

I’m not like the other quaint little shops and houses in Jim Thorpe. To the contrary, I sit on a hill above the town, telling it like it is since 1871. If I seem a little rough around the edges, it’s because I have a hand-hewed stone exterior. (That's how Gothic Revival architecture rolls.)

I’m as exciting on the inside as I am tough on the outside. The tours that I host take guests into the two-level cell block, guided by the oak railing on the cast-iron staircase. Here, I tell them about the scandalous Molly Maguire trials during Jim Thorpe’s coal mining days. And I’ve been known to send chills up more than a few spines during the after-hours ghost tours.

But don’t limit my charms to my Shawshank Redemption-meets-Green Mile flair. I also have a sweet spot in the Warden’s Quarters. Picture this: After a long day of running the museum -- leading tour groups, selling informational booklets at the gift shop, keeping spouses from locking their partners in the cells -- you can kick back in the living room’s recliner, sip on a glass of wine in front of the fireplace, and soak in the success of the day. Sounds cozy, doesn’t it?

See yourself here? Find out more about me.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Atalaya Castle is a unique example of Moorish architecture infused with American craftsmanship.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, Logan Ward takes readers on a road trip down South Carolina' s Grand Strand, where Myrtle Beach is located. Along the way he visits the ruins of Atalaya in Murrells Inlet, an 80-year-old castle part of Huntington State Park with a vibrant history of art and culture.

Today, Atalaya hosts an annual arts festival in September, drawing fine artisans and aficionados from around the country. Here, we take a fresh look at the estate with more photos by Jody Horton from our feature story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

By Erin Carlson Mast, Executive Director of President Lincoln’s Cottage

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Milton Shinberg speaking at the Lincoln Ideas Forum on April 10, 2015.

In an essay about Abraham Lincoln’s daily, 3-mile commute from the Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home to the White House, poet Walt Whitman observed, “I see very plainly Abraham Lincoln’s dark brown face, with the deep-cut lines, the eyes, always to me with a deep latent sadness in the expression.”

Whitman concluded that, “None of the artists or pictures has caught the deep, though subtle and indirect, expression of this man's face. There is something else there.”

There is still something else there -- the spirit of Lincoln’s ideas lives on. This April marks the 150th anniversary of his untimely death, and historic sites, museums, and affinity groups across the nation are commemorating Lincoln through a multitude of exhibits and events.

At President Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, D.C., we created an array of programs examining the enduring legacy of Lincoln’s life and ideas, including an exhibit, a live retracing of Lincoln’s horseback commute, a memorial tribute inspired by 19th-century mourning practices, and the first annual Lincoln Ideas Forum.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Mothball

Posted on: April 22nd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 3 Comments

 

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The city of Detroit mothballed the Ransom Gillis House in the early 2000s.

When I was a little girl, my parents and I would often visit our hometown near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, during the summer. I remember how, at the conclusion of our visit, my mom would scatter mothballs all over the couches and beds in the house to keep the mold and moth larvae at bay until our next visit.

I remember being glad to leave because the smell of the mothballs was unbearable. Don’t get me wrong, I was all for coming back to intact furniture, but I was also relieved that I didn’t have to live with the strong stench when I returned to Virginia.

This was my unpleasant sensory image of mothballs and mothballing. So when I came across the term “mothball” in a preservation context, I was pleasantly surprised.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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The first part of the African House murals.

In March, the National Trust named Melrose Plantation’s African House a National Treasure, kicking off the designation with a HOPE Crew project to restore the African House’s roof. Now, we continue to detail the African House’s historical influence and unique cultural heritage by exploring its murals and the artist who created them.

The African House murals are nine panels of folk art that depict the colorfully rich, day-to-day life and culture of the Cane River Country’s Creole inhabitants. But more than that, these murals lend insight into the life of artist Clementine Hunter during the early 20th century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Celebrating National Park Week 2015: Where History and Nature Intersect

Posted on: April 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

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Jonathan B. Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, speaks at the Jefferson Memorial on Thursday, April 16.

It’s National Park Week 2015 -- a week-long celebration hosted by the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation that encourages the public to visit, volunteer at, and share stories of their favorite parks. The week’s events include a weekend of free admission, a day of service on Earth Day, and online sharing of user photos and memories.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.