[Historic Bars] The Backroom Bar in New York City

Posted on: October 16th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Fans of the giggle water get to celebrate hooch in a big way this month as Preservation Nation covers blind pigs and juice joints – a.k.a. speakeasies -- as part of our historic bars series. Next up: The Backroom Bar in New York City.

The Backroom’s ‘fake front’ as the Lower East Side Toy Company is a nod to old New York City speakeasies that often used supposed apothecaries or blacksmith shops to conceal their true identity. Ironically, the Backroom’s Prohibition predecessor never needed a fake front, as Ratner’s kosher restaurant concealed the speakeasy with a legitimate and profitable business.
The Backroom’s ‘fake front’ as the Lower East Side Toy Company is a nod to old New York City speakeasies that often used supposed apothecaries or blacksmith shops to conceal their true identity. Ironically, the Backroom’s Prohibition predecessor never needed a fake front, as Ratner’s kosher restaurant concealed the speakeasy with a legitimate and profitable business.

There are few places on earth, if any, that I enjoy sipping a few cocktails and drinking in the atmosphere more than modern-day New York City. But if I were given the chance to hit the town in the Roaring Twenties, I sure as hell wouldn’t pass it up. Lucky for me, I know a place I can do a little of both: the Lower East Side Toy Company, on Norfolk Street, between Delancey and Rivington.

That’s not the actual name, of course. It’s just the ‘fake front’ for the Backroom Bar, a contemporary speakeasy with roots that date back to Prohibition.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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The Yes on 8 Action Center on Opening Night

Last week, our work to help save Union Terminal in Cincinnati took a big step forward: we celebrated the grand opening of the Yes on 8 Action Center in downtown Cincinnati -- the National Trust’s first ever pop-up!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

 

Preservation Expert, Steve Stier, mentors some of the students from SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps
Preservation expert Steve Stier mentors some of the students from SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps.

Located on the coast of Northwest Michigan, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore has long been a favorite vacation spot for families throughout the state. The picturesque shoreline area, named “The Most Beautiful Place in America” by ABC’s Good Morning America in 2011, boasts many attractions including wineries, water-sports, shopping and camping. But last month, a group of young people made this familiar June pilgrimage with a different kind of summertime activity in mind: historic barn preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Historic Real Estate: Adaptive Reuse Edition

Posted on: October 14th, 2014 by Geoff Montes

 

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The former schoolhouse was built in 1902 and sits on two acres in the Rocky Mountains.

Mountain SchoolhouseHoward, Colorado

Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, several miles south of the historic town of Salida, this 1,934-square-foot home was originally used as a schoolhouse when it was built in 1902. The students are long gone, but the building has since been remodeled as a residence that contains two bedrooms, two baths, a sun room, and loft. The school’s custom mill work and original fir floors remain, and the building has been updated to be energy efficient, with a solar electric grid tie system that ensures power even on a cloudy day. Also included in the two-acre parcel is an insulated garage and workshop with a custom dust collection system, bathroom, and wood stove. The property has been landscaped to include a drip irrigation system, a timer for garden beds, and a small orchard. The original school bell is also still in place. Price: $435,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

Engaging a More Diverse Community in Preservation

Posted on: October 10th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

HOPE Crew at Woodlawn. Credit: John Boal
HOPE Crew at Woodlawn

During her recent speech "Towards a More Perfect Union: Engaging a More Diverse Community in Preservation" at Hampton University, National Trust President Stephanie Meeks shared the preservation movement’s challenge to become more inclusive and highlighted the National Trust’s work to protect and preserve diverse historic places such as Fort Monroe, Joe Frazier’s Gym, and Rosenwald Schools.

The National Trust is committed to protecting sites that represent the full breadth of our American history, but cannot do it alone. That’s where you come in! We need your help to craft a vision for engaging a more diverse community in preservation, and invite you to share your ideas below.

Additionally, if you know of a diverse site that could use the National Trust’s help, let us know -- we want to hear from you! And check out our book on Preserving African-American Historic Places to learn how you can save a place.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.