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Solid Stone Colonial Seeks Connoisseur of Finely Aged Homes

2880 Forge Road -- Glasgow, Virginia

I may not be a brick house, but I’m solid as a rock. My 20-inch thick stone walls have endured for centuries and, like finely aged wine, get better over time.

All the life and vigor I’ve acquired over the last 200-plus years shines through in every fiber of my historic character -- from  my exposed wooden beams, to my beaded plank partition walls, to my stone fireplaces. All that rich, historic flavor will embrace you in any one of my three bedrooms and give you that comforting, warm feeling of home.

If you’re up for an adventure, roam around on my four-acre tract and follow the grooves of the footpaths carved out by the many explorers and frontiersmen before you. And at the end of your walk, let the awe-inspiring vista of the Blue Ridge Mountains take your breath away.

Think you are savvy enough to appreciate me? Look me up here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Down To the Wire Episode 4: The James River Matters

Posted on: June 5th, 2015 by Tom Wall 1 Comment

 

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The #DownToTheWire team has been spreading the word from Richmond to Jamestown about Dominion Virginia Power’s plan to forever alter the historic James River.

Over the past two months, the #DownToTheWire team has been hard at work in Virginia, spreading the word from Richmond to Jamestown about Dominion Virginia Power’s plan to forever alter the historic James River with a new high-voltage transmission line.

And though we met thousands of people along the way, the sentiment always seemed to stay the same: “Don’t ruin our river with your ugly power lines!” Check out the final clip in our video series to see how we made sure that Dominion got the message loud and clear.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

This Place Matters: A Reflection (and Gallery) on Humble Places We Love

Posted on: June 4th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

The pagoda in New Orleans in 2011.
The pagoda in New Orleans in 2011

With Preservation Month all wrapped up, Ariella Cohen of Next City shared a lovely personal reflection on a place that matters to her: a quirky pagoda in New Orleans that survived Hurricane Katrina, neglect, and abandonment to find new life as a bustling community cafe.

Here's an excerpt:

By the time I made it back to the pagoda last spring, it was loud and happy and overflowing with activity -- the way I’d always thought it should be. A young man I recognized from the neighborhood was working behind the counter. A friend was playing guitar on the deck. The greens on my breakfast taco came from an urban farm staffed by New Orleans youth. The pagoda was -- and is -- a place that matters.

Read the full story and see the cafe's terrific transformation here. Bonus: a cool gallery of some of Next City's favorite "This Place Matters" photos from Preservation Month!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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Left: Gary Martinez of Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Right: The marquee and facade of the restored Saenger Theatre in New Orleans.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we take a peek behind the curtain at the newly renovated Kings Theatre in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Seized during the 1970s in lieu of back taxes, the historic venue idled vacant until the New York City Economic Development Corporation issued a Request for Proposals to restore it in 2008.

A consortium of groups participated in the project, spearheaded by ACE Theatrical Group and Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Below are excerpts from our wide-ranging conversation with Gary Martinez, president and principal at Martinez+Johnson. [The interview has been edited for length and clarity.]... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

Welcome back, Historic Bars series! Let's start it off right with a trip to Milwaukee.

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The Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery is now a tavern, event center, and gift shop.

Before it was in the hand of every horn-rimmed, flannel-clad, suspender-wearing urban farmer (read: “hipster”), Pabst Blue Ribbon was a classic, blue-collar American beer down on its luck.

The same could be said for the actual Pabst Brewery, though its hero was a genuine, good-natured guy by the name of Jim Haertel, now the owner of Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Parapet

Posted on: June 3rd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 3 Comments

 

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The parapets on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad depot in Kingman, Arizona, are a signature characteristic of the Mission Revival style.

Parapets can be one of those mysterious architectural features in the sense that people may recognize them, but may not know the technical term for them. “A Preservation Handbook for Historic Residential Properties and Districts in Salt Lake City” defines it as:

Parapet, noun

A low horizontal wall at the edge of a roof.

The photo above shows the parapets on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad depot in Kingman, Arizona. The depot's parapets are a signature characteristic of its Mission Revival architectural style.

Word in use: “12. Art Deco and Art Moderne. Both of these styles feature open floor plans, flat or very low-pitched roofs with low profile parapets, smooth stucco walls, and horizontal groupings of metal casement windows.” -- Emily Potter, “[10 on Tuesday] Buying a Historic Home: What’s Your Style? (Part 2)

So the next time you pass by a parapet, don’t be afraid to call it out and demystify the mystery.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.