150708_blog-photo_firestone-today
The exterior of the rehabilitated Firestone Building.

Last year, the rehabilitation of the 1920s Firestone building in Gainesville, Florida was completed. Phoebe Cade Miles (the daughter of Gatorade inventor Dr. James Cade) and her husband, Richard Miles, of the Cade Museum, sponsored the project and worked with father/son team Richard and Ryland Wagner of Joyner Construction to complete the rehabilitation. The project was so well done that the Wagners were recognized by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation with an Honorable Mention for Adaptive Reuse award.

Recently, we sat down with Phoebe and Richard to talk about the Firestone rehabilitation project.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Rehabilitation

Posted on: July 8th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 2 Comments

 

150313_blog-photo_jackson-library
A historic barn in Jackson, New Hampshire was rehabilitated as the city's public library.

In our last post, we examined the term “restoration” and how its specific definition shapes its unique role in preservation. Today we will look at the term “rehabilitation” and how it is applied in preservation practice.

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards’ Four Approaches to the Treatment of Historic Properties defines "rehabilitation" as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register of Historic Places Guide.

The first episode of our National Register Guide covered the basics, like what the National Register really is, how many listings it contains, and how many new listings are added each year.

Episode Two dives just a little deeper to explore the true function of the National Register. This episode answers questions like:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

150707_blog-photo_Maddie-and-exhibit
Maddie Gregurek focused her National History Day project on Theodore Roosevelt's leadership and legacy in the conservation movement.

Early this year, high school freshman Maddie Gregurek entered Iowa’s National History Day regional competition (a preliminary round of the Kenneth E. Behring National History Day Contest). Maddie took the competition’s theme, “Leadership and Legacy,” and focused her project on Theodore Roosevelt’s role in the conservation movement.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Travel Itinerary] Elkmont Historic District, Tennessee

Posted on: July 6th, 2015 by Nancy Tinker 3 Comments

 

150702_blog-photo_Daisy-Town-Street
Daisy Town sits at the heart of the historic Elkmont community and includes the Appalachian Clubhouse.

Nestled in the lush Little River Valley of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the Elkmont Historic District. The site has played multiple roles over many years. It was home to East Tennessee’s earliest settlers, a 19th-century logging camp and railroad line, and the Smokies’ most popular public campground. Elkmont is also the park’s most controversial historic district.

The story begins in 1908 when the Little River Lumber Company established the town of Elkmont as a base for logging operations and site of a railroad devoted to timber removal. Within two years, 86,000 acres of the Smokies had been cut, and the lumber company began deeding land to Knoxville businessmen who constructed cabins as weekend retreats and summer homes.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Nancy Tinker

Nancy Tinker

Nancy Tinker is a Senior Field Officer in the Charleston Field Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

 

Our In Transition series digs back in and brings you up to speed on the current status of historic places previously featured in Preservation magazine or the PreservationNation blog.

150706_blog-photo_Orange-County-Government-Center,-Goshen,-New-York
The Orange County Government Center is a Brutalist-style building designed by architect Paul Rudolph.

The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, New York was featured in the Winter 2013 Issue of Preservation magazine as the focus of the article, “Defending Brutalism.” The complex was designed by architect Paul Rudolph and completed in 1971. After 40 years of use, wear and tear on the building showed in its leaky roofs and outdated mechanical systems. In 2011, tropical storms Irene and Lee exacerbated problems and closed the Orange County Government Center for good.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.