[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Architectural Conservation

Posted on: August 12th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

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Architect of the Capitol masons repair the balustrade of the Cannon House Office Building.

“Conservation” is a term that we most associate with protecting the natural environment. However, “conservation” -- or more technically, “architectural conservation” -- can also be used to refer to the protection of the built environment.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources Historic Preservation Division Glossary of Preservation Services and Terminology defines it as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

Written by Anya Grahn

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Single-wall structures can be found throughout the Pacific Northwest, West, and the South. Some communities, such as Park City, Utah, have found ingenious ways to restore these structures.

Chances are that if you live in a community that sprung up because of sawmills, railroads, oilfields, or even mining, your historic structure may be comprised of single-wall, plank wall, or box house construction.

Rapid population growth during times of economic boom required the immediate construction of buildings, and single-wall construction or “wood tents” allowed communities to meet mounting demands. These rudimentary wood structures were meant to provide temporary shelter; however, many have been successfully preserved and continue to be used today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Climate Change and Preservation: Where Do They Intersect?

Posted on: August 11th, 2015 by Stephanie Meeks 4 Comments

 

In her President's Note in the Summer Issue of Preservation magazine, National Trust for Historic Preservation President, Stephanie Meeks discusses preservationists' responsibility to protect historic places in the face of climate change. Her thoughts have been republished in full below.

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National Trust for Historic Preservation President, Stephanie Meeks.

Summertime brings picnics, baseball games, family vacations, and, increasingly, record-busting temperatures. Each of the 10 hottest years on record has happened since 1998, including the hottest of all, 2014. As a preservation community, we are starting to grapple with the effects of this changing climate in very concrete ways.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register Guide.

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Field Director Rob Nieweg, Vice President of Public Affairs Germonique Ulmer, and National Trust President Stephanie K. Meeks learn about the signficance of Hampton University.

Episode Six of our National Register of Historic Places Guide explored the formula for creating a narrative statement of significance that will give your property the best chance of being listed on the National Register. Episode Seven of our guide explains how to actually establish a property's historic significance.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Summer Concert Series] B.B. King at the Regal Theater

Posted on: August 10th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): B.B. King (Leo Lauchie: bass, Duke Jethro: piano, Sonny Freeman: drums, Bobby Forte and Johnny Board: tenor sax)

Venue: The Regal Theater

Location: Bronzeville, Chicago

Date: November 21, 1964

Memorable Moment: The duration of Sweet Little Angel, It’s My Own Fault, and How Blue Can You Get? (Songs two, three, and four on the Live at the Regal album). If that series doesn’t stir something in you, you may not have a soul.

Show Vibe: Class and soul, all the way.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

It’s All Fun and Games at the President Woodrow Wilson House

Posted on: August 10th, 2015 by Lauren Walser No Comments

 


At the President Woodrow Wilson House's Vintage Game Night guests can enjoy 1920s-era board games, croquet in the garden (weather permitting), and locally-brewed beer.

It’s not every day you can party at a president’s house. But at the President Woodrow Wilson House in Washington, D.C.’s Kalorama neighborhood, things get rowdy the first Wednesday of every month as doors open for Vintage Game Night.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.