Historic Real Estate: The Bungalow Edition

Posted on: September 26th, 2014 by Geoff Montes

 

Bungalow in DC
This 1922 bungalow on Brandywine Street in Washington, D.C. is located just a few blocks from the Tenleytown Metro stop.

Brandywine -- Washington, D.C.

This 2,000-square-foot bungalow on Brandywine Street in D.C.’s American University Park neighborhood features spacious front and back porches, three bedrooms with walk-in closets, and a finished basement. Built in 1922, the sun-filled bungalow’s interior has been thoroughly updated and brought into the 21st century. Located just a short walk to the Tenleytown Metro stop, Fort Reno Park, and a plethora of shops, the property is ideal for urban dwellers looking for a charming piece of history in a vibrant community. Price: $875,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

[Historic Bars] The Corner Club in Moscow, Idaho

Posted on: September 25th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 4 Comments

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. Last up for America’s historic sports bars: the Corner Club in Moscow, Idaho.

The Corner Club has been a Moscow, Idaho, institution since 1948.
The Corner Club has been a Moscow, Idaho, institution since 1948.

A man and his horse walk into a bar. The man orders two beers: one for him, one for his horse.

If you think I’m setting up a joke, you can stop waiting for the punch line. This is a true story from one day in the history of the Corner Club, a beloved 66-year-old sports bar in Moscow, Idaho.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

A New Chapter for the Frances Perkins Homestead

Posted on: September 23rd, 2014 by Geoff Montes

 

The Perkins Homestead in 2013
The Perkins Homestead in 2013

In the small town of Damariscotta, Maine, members of the Frances Perkins Center are working to preserve not only the legacy of Frances Perkins, who became the first female member of a Presidential cabinet in 1933, but also her ancestral homestead and lifelong summer residence several miles away.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

A Brief History of Palm Springs’ El Mirador Tower

Posted on: September 22nd, 2014 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

Since it opened in 1928, El Mirador Hotel and its iconic tower have been a Palm Springs landmark.
Since it opened in 1928, El Mirador Hotel and its iconic tower have been a Palm Springs landmark.

Think of Palm Springs, and you’re likely to envision a desert oasis dotted with sleek, Midcentury Modern buildings. But as you’ll read in the Fall 2014 issue of Preservation, the city has no shortage of buildings dating back to the earlier part of the last century.

These buildings from the 1920s and ‘30s tell the stories of Palm Springs' earliest days. But perhaps the structure with one of the more interesting, winding tales is the El Mirador Tower.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Update: Colonial Williamsburg Landmark Carter’s Grove Sold

Posted on: September 22nd, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 12 Comments

 

The stately 1755 mansion is considered one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the United States.
The view of the Georgian-style mansion, completed in 1755, from the James River.

Late last week we were informed by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation that it has successfully sold Carter’s Grove Plantation, a National Historic Landmark located in Williamsburg, Virginia. The estate was sold to a group formed by well-known preservationist Samuel M. Mencoff.

When we last visited Carter's Grove in 2012, it was privately owned and undergoing various repairs for interior maintenance issues that had been deferred. Below is a press release from the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, which outlines the next chapter in the rich history of Carter’s Grove.

Colonial Williamsburg Announces Sale of Carter’s Grove Plantation

National historic landmark protected in perpetuity by conservation easement; new owner to assure preservation in close collaboration with the Foundation

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. – On Sept. 11 the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation sold Carter’s Grove Plantation, including the Georgian-style mansion and 400 acres of land that are subject to a conservation easement, as well as an additional 76 acres adjoining the property. The buyer is Carter’s Grove Associates LLC, a Delaware limited liability company formed by Samuel M. Mencoff, a well-respected preservationist from Chicago who has restored properties in the Midwest and in Newport, Rhode Island.

The conservation easement, which was placed on the property in 2007, is co-held by the Virginia Outdoors Foundation and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources. The easement protects the site’s historic, architectural, visual, archaeological and environmental resources in perpetuity.

Colonial Williamsburg recently regained ownership of Carter’s Grove at the conclusion of the bankruptcy filed in 2011 by the limited liability company that acquired the property in 2007. Working with the court-appointed trustee during the bankruptcy process, the Foundation funded and oversaw repairs to the mansion that restored it to its previous condition.

The Carter’s Grove Plantation site, located on the James River eight miles southeast of Williamsburg, is a historic landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places and on the Virginia Historic Landmarks Register. The mansion is considered to be one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the country.

“Sam Mencoff is superbly qualified to be the steward of this important property,” said Colin G. Campbell, president and chief executive officer of the Foundation. “His commitment to historic preservation, demonstrated through his completion of a number of important restoration projects, is well known in the preservation community.”

“Carter’s Grove is a treasure, in many ways chronicling the history of the New World,” said Mr. Mencoff. “My family and I are honored to embrace the stewardship of this remarkable place, fully recognizing the privilege it is and the responsibility it confers. My team and I look forward to working closely with Colonial Williamsburg to preserve this important piece of our national heritage for generations to come.”

Media contact:

Joe Straw
757-220-7287
jstraw@cwf.org

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.