American World’s Fairs Icons that Have Stood the Test of Time

Posted on: June 20th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 6 Comments

 

Credit: Library of Congress, Wikimedia Commons
An aerial-view print of the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y.

The World’s Fair is one of the longest-running international exhibitions, in which countries gather to showcase premier inventions -- from Belgian waffles and ice cream to X-ray machines and electrical current systems. Ever since the first World’s Fair in 1851, which took place in London, host countries have constructed the most fantastic buildings, each outdoing the previous host.

During the Paris Universal Exposition in 1889, France erected the Eiffel Tower. In return, Chicago unveiled the never-before-seen Ferris wheel during the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which drew a crowd equal to a third of the U.S. population at the time. However, most World’s Fair buildings are constructed to be temporary, torn down after the one-time event.

Fortunately, not all World’s Fair buildings are demolished, and some even become the most iconic symbol of a city: Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, the New York State Pavilion, and certainly the Eiffel Tower. The upcoming World’s Fair will take place in Milan next year, but let’s take a look at some of the most iconic buildings that were built for the World’s Fair that have stood the test of time here in the United States.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

 

In this round of our historic bars series, we travel to the American frontier of Alaska to a little spit of land to take a look at the Salty Dawg Saloon.

Credit: Cissy Rockett, Salty Dawg Saloon
The log cabin that houses the Salty Dawg was built in 1897. 

If you’ve never been to the Homer Spit, off Homer, Alaska, or heard of a drink called a Duck Fart, you might need to make tracks for the historic Salty Dawg Saloon. Housed in a 117-year-old cabin that has served the town in various capacities as a railroad station, grocery store, and post office, the Salty Dawg, which opened in 1957, is beloved by tourists and locals alike.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery in Portland, Oregon: A Refuge for All

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding

 

Credit: Metro and Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery
The MacLeay family mausoleum, in the southern section of Lone Fir.

Portland, Ore., might have been known as Boston, Ore., if not for the outcome of a simple coin toss in 1845. Founding father Asa Lovejoy had been pulling for Boston as the city’s name, but co-founder Francis Pettygrove, who was partial to the Portland moniker, outflipped him.

The penny they used is enshrined at the Oregon Historical Society, and Lovejoy himself rests in peace at Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery, in the city’s Buckman neighborhood. (Pettygrove, fittingly enough, is buried in another cemetery on the opposite side of the Willamette River.)

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

Credit: Diana Larrea
The ART History Mural Project and an exclusive Instagram contest will take place at the Miami Marine Stadium on Saturday, June 28.

It hasn't been long since we featured a young Miami preservationist, Ivan Robles, who's working to bring attention to saving the Miami Marine Stadium, but we're back with more exciting stadium news.

Next Saturday, June 28, the National Trust is partnering with Friends of Miami Marine Stadium (FMMS) to launch a Day of Art and Action, a daylong celebration of the historic stadium. Three big things are happening that day:

  1. Gloria Estefan -- a trustee of the National Trust -- will join other representatives from the National Trust to unveil several accomplishments in the campaign to restore the stadium.
  2. The highly anticipated ART History Mural Project will bring nine internationally known artists to the stadium to create large-scale murals.
  3. There will be an Instagram contest hosted by the National Trust, in which the 30 best "Instagrammers" of Miami will get to meet Gloria Estefan, the nine world-renowned artists, and Hilario Candela, the stadium's architect.

There's a lot to look forward to, but before next weekend, let's take a closer look at the artistic event that will directly benefit the stadium, as well as the man behind it: Craig O'Neil.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

 

Now that we have a revamped Preservation Tips & Tools template, we're looking back at some of our most popular "10 on Tuesday" toolkits and giving them a refresh with our new look.

When we make friends we like to learn about them -- we ask them where they grew up, where they went to school, and when they were born.

Our homes are a lot like that. We spend time with them, value them, and take care of them. So it makes sense that we want to know more about them -- who lived there before, how it’s changed over time, and when it was built.

If only walls could talk, right? Instead, here are 10 ways to uncover the story behind your older or historic home (or any other building you’re interested in).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.