As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register Guide.

Episode Two of our National Register of Historic Places Guide focused on the function of the National Register, and answered questions such as "What does being listed on the National Register mean?" and "Does listing protect a property from demolition?"

Episode Three peels back another layer of National Register myth and legend to answer questions such as:

  • Does listing in the National Register place any automatic restrictions or requirements on a property?
  • Can I paint my National Register-listed property any color I like?
  • Can I demolish my National Register-listed property?
  • Does my National Register-listed property need to meet certain requirements to qualify for a historic tax credit?
  • Can listing in the National Register trigger a local ordinance or restriction?

We hope you enjoy the show.

Special thanks to the President Woodrow Wilson House for filming accommodations.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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The Tahitian Room provided Howard Hall a unique place to entertain guests.

Homes are a lot like people -- there is always more than what appears at first glance.

The Brucemore estate, a site of the National Trust since 1981, is no exception. Upstairs, the 26-acre park-like estate bears witness to a Wagnerian mural, rich woodwork, and a striking pipe organ. The basement, however, tells a different story, reflecting the quirky personalities of its last residents.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. An aficionado of coffee and music, she loves to discover hidden stories through reading, traveling, and meeting new people.

 

By Sophia Dembling

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Esther Gordy Edwards established the Motown Museum in 1985.

Berry Gordy, founder of Motown, has called his big sister, Esther Gordy Edwards, “bossy” and he knew in 1958 that borrowing money from the family savings club she had established wouldn’t be easy.

“She had power and influence,” Gordy wrote in his autobiography, To Be Loved. “She was a strong businesswoman, and very careful with money. The family depended on Esther to keep these things together.”

Gordy got the fight and the words he’d expected to hear from his sister -- If you’re so smart, why ain’t you rich? And, she continued, “You’re 29 years old and what have you done so far in your life?” In the end, though, Edwards approved an $800 loan -- provided Gordy sign a contract with future royalties as security.

The rest, of course, is music history -- still preserved in Hitsville U.S.A. in Detroit. The museum founded by Edwards in the modest house where some of the greatest hits of the 1960s were recorded by some of the era’s most iconic acts: the Supremes, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, Gladys Knight and the Pips, and a who’s-who of others.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

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Shelby put her new masonry skills to use as a volunteer at the Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park this year.

Last year, right around this time, corpsmembers from the Michigan-based SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps were in the midst of rehabilitating the historic Goffar Barn at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, alongside Lake Michigan.

One corpsmember, Shelby, was not only able to learn while on the job, she was able to take the preservation masonry and repointing skills she had picked up at the Goffar Barn to volunteer her time, and expertise, to another nearby preservation project.

We caught up with Shelby, one year out from her training experience in HOPE Crew, and learned about her new opportunities, including a volunteer masonry project for the Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park in Traverse City, Michigan.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Weekend Reads from USA Today, The Boston Globe, and More

Posted on: July 10th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week. This week we’ve rounded up stories on a few of our National Treasures, one of our historic sites, and our HOPE Crew initiative.

Nantucket Lightship. Credit: Johnathneric - On & Off/ Off & On, Flickr

“A 79-year-old floating lighthouse that once illuminated the passage for ships through the choppy waters of the Nantucket Shoals will shine its powerful main beacon this summer for the first time in 40 years. The owners of the Nantucket Lightship LV-112, the oldest ship of its kind and the largest ever built in the United States, will flip the switch on the ship’s beacon Aug. 7.” – The Boston Globe: Historic lightship to shine for first time since 1975

“The goal of the program, called HOPE Crew by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is to train youngsters on restoration skills. In Prince William Forest they are repairing windows and masonry at some of the cabins in the camping areas...’ The goal of the program is to engage young people in their National Parks that are close to them. We work on a lot of different scales on a lot of different projects, but at the end of the day it’s all historic preservation,’ said Monica Rhodes, associate director of HOPE Crew.” – NBC-4 TV Washington: HOPE Crew’s Forest Fix-Ups in Prince William County

“The New York State Pavilion was built by Philip Johnson for the 1964 World's Fair and subsequently abandoned to time. And though the fate of the famous structure was once in doubt, it is now definitely on the way to being saved and rebuilt... The Tent of Tomorrow was opened to the public for the first time in years at the 50th anniversary of the fair last spring. Now, the walls of the tent have been restored and this spring the crowd-funded New York State Pavilion Paint Project began to repaint the Pavilion's exterior ‘crown’ in bright yellow.” – Curbed: New York State Pavilion Is Being Restored to Its 1964 Colors

“The side of a building on Louisville's historic Whiskey Row collapsed after a large blaze erupted there Monday afternoon. Three buildings were damaged in the fire — 111, 113 and 115 West Main Street — all part of a project to redevelop the historic buildings into new lofts, retail and restaurant space called 111 Whiskey Row. The fire was reported at about 4:30 p.m. in the same block the Brown-Forman Corp. plans to create the Old Forester distillery experience. Those buildings were spared from damage in Monday's fire, according to one of the developers.” – USA Today: Fire Ravages Louisville’s Famed Whiskey Row

“A day after the tragic shooting at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, Drayton Hall director George McDaniel and his staff were still trying to comprehend the enormity of the event. Yet McDaniel, who is retiring in September after 26 years of overseeing Drayton Hall, still firmly believes that an understanding of history—both the good and the bad—has increasing relevance in today’s world and can bring people together to work through what he calls “troublesome” history.” – Preservation Leadership Forum Blog: Looking Back and Looking Forward at Drayton Hall with George McDaniel

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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11031 Franks Rd., Huntingdon, Pennsylvania

Peaceful Paradise Seeks Owner Desiring a Slower-Paced Life

Historic Christian Oyer House, c. 1830

With me, solitude and serenity are all yours. It may not appear so at first; you might see an uptight, stuffy, well-preserved historic house. But if you look past my exterior stucco stone walls and begin to pull back the Federal-style layers, you’ll be more than surprised at what you find.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.