Beyond Green Building: Morning Round-Up

Posted on: October 9th, 2007 by Patrice Frey

 

I'm back from St. Paul -- -and here are couple of articles that caught my eye this morning.

For Energy Consumption, There's No Place Like Home – ENN. According to a survey commissioned by the Johns Manville company (a leading manufacturer of an extensive line of energy-efficient building products, such as insulation materials) most Americans think that the transportation sector (cars, trucks, buses, etc) is the number one user of energy in the country. But the family car is not the number one energy hog, it’s the family home. (Since most homes are energized by fossil fuels, American homes are also responsible for the most greenhouse gas emissions.) Tool Helps Businesses Compare Their Buildings' Carbon Emissions to Others in Same Region - ENN. Portfolio Manager is an online tool that helps buildings take control of their energy to increase energy efficiency and help protect our environment. Organizations have used Portfolio Manager to benchmark the energy performance for billions of square feet of office buildings, schools, hotels, and other buildings across the country and thousands of buildings have earned the Energy Star for superior energy efficiency.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Nevada Church Will Be Reborn

Posted on: October 8th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

St. Augustine Church, NevadaLast week marked the latest milestone in the restoration of Nevada's oldest Catholic church building, St. Augustine's. That's when a new steel roof was completed for the red brick, Gothic revival and Italianate structure that has been a part of the historic silver mining town of Austin since 1866.

The new roof means no more "flown-in insulation," as the building's owner, Jan Morrison, calls the 25 cubic yards of bird droppings that accumulated in the rafters over the years by falling through gaps in the old tin and aluminum roof. Morrison isn't sure how much it weighed, but after a hazmat crew removed the guano, she says, "the ceiling raised up two inches." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Reaching Tweens

Posted on: October 6th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Author Blue Balliett signs her booksAfter three or so days of tackling issues of concern, it was a tonic on Friday afternoon to walk into a session entitled “Reaching Tweens.” The folks so labeled, I’m told, are poised between childhood and teenage – and they’re the target of a writer with the wonderful name of Blue Balliett, a Chicagoan who composes children’s mysteries. Her second thriller, The Wright 3, is all about the Trust’s very own Robie House in Chicago, menaced by demolition until three sixth-graders and their teacher band together to save the Frank Lloyd Wright landmark. It’s a proper mystery with weird events, mysterious strangers, and cryptic messages. It’s also an adventure that Balliett uses to infect her young readers with an appreciation for architecture, especially of the historic sort. “Nothing’s as important to the future of preservation,” Balliett told the audience, “than engaging the interest of our kids.”

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Meeting Mr. Wright in Minneapolis

Posted on: October 6th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

Purcell-Cutts HouseWalking into a Frank Lloyd Wright house is a little like entering a National Park. Something shifts and suddenly everything around you is richer, calmer, more beautiful than the rest of the world.

The first stop on yesterday’s sold-out bus tour, “Restoring Frank Lloyd Wright and Prairie School Structures in Minneapolis,” was Redeemer Missionary Baptist Church, one of the few Prairie-style churches ever built. Architects Purcell and Feick designed the 1910 church with horizontal lines and square motifs reminiscent of city blocks. Inside the churchy-smelling sanctuary, restoration architect Robert Mack showed us how his firm hid a baptismal font behind the wood-paneled altar. He stepped back, and the panel descended, revealing a tub, Murphy bed-style. “That was one of the more clever things that I’ve done,” Mack said. (The National Trust gave an Honor Award to the project in 2001.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Can an Arena Help a Neighborhood?

Posted on: October 5th, 2007 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

Businesses along West Seventh Street, St. Paul, MN.I discovered the Xcel Energy Center on Sunday night, when I had the good fortune to get to see the Minnesota Wild play their final pre-season hockey game (which they won -- yeah! -- though that's relevant neither to the story nor the Wild's standings). I didn't know it at the time, but I would be returning to the vicinity of the arena repeatedly, as the adjacent RiverCentre was the conference headquarters. I also hadn't realized that the "From Immigrants to Sports Fans: Transformations in the West Seventh Street Neighborhood" tour for which I was registered was focused on the area immediately surrounding the Xcel Center -- though had the title specified hockey fans, I might have caught on a bit sooner.

I decided to take this particular tour because I wanted to see how St. Paul handled development in the surrounding area. Washington, DC, my home for nearly 10 years, built an arena in Chinatown just before my arrival that inspired a tremendous economic boom, but also caused the flight of the immigrant population who gave the neighborhood its name. With the exception of the arch over H Street and Chinese characters on the signs for chain restaurants and shops, the streets surrounding the Verizon Center could be anywhere. The local character has been erased almost completely. I needed this tour to tell me that other cities find a way to combine growth and development with maintaining the unique flavor of a neighborhood.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.