University of Missouri Begins Work on Neglected 19th-Century Stone House

Posted on: November 13th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Hickman HouseAbandoned for three decades, one of Missouri's oldest stone houses, located two miles from the beginning of the Santa Fe Trail, is now on its way to being restored.

Last month, work began on the 1819 Thomas Hickman House, now part of the 600-acre University of Missouri-Columbia's research farm near New Franklin, Mo.

The university, which has owned the Hickman House since the 1950s, has raised $1.25 million for the restoration project, thanks in part to a matching grant of $250,000 from Save America's Treasures, a public-private partnership between the National Park Service and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

News from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 13th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Mrs. Mildred Bennett, seated, her daughter behind her and her grandaughter giving her a kiss on move-in day, October 3.Sad news from the field, today.

Mildred Bennett died peacefully at her home in Holy Cross early Sunday morning. Mrs. Bennett’s house was one of the first targets of the HOME AGAIN! New Orleans program, offering technical and financial assistance to owners of houses in flooded historic neighborhoods. Donna Duplantier expressed gratitude that her grandmother was able to return to her house, built in 1884, on Dauphine Street. Mrs. Bennett had moved back into her house on October 3. She was 90 years old.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sun, Sand, Sustainability…And Sprawl Too!

Posted on: November 10th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

Fort San Geronimo, Caribe Hilton, San JuanI just returned from 10 days of conferences – a week in San Juan for the APT Conference followed by 3 days at the Greenbuild Conference in Chicago. Both conferences energized me and made me so proud to be playing a professional role in the climate change discussion.

APT (the Association for Preservation Technology) is one of the National Trust’s primary partners in the Sustainable Preservation Coalition – a coalition of national organizations responsible for developing policies and best practices who have joined together to create national policy on the intersection of historic preservation and sustainable practices. This APT Conference was also my final conference as President of the organization, and I was thrilled to be the president at the most successful and highly attended conference ever in the organization’s 39 years. This was also our first off-shore conference which proved that “curb appeal” of conferences is as important if not more important than intellectual content!! We had 729 attendees, far more than the 200 we had originally planned as the breakeven number.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

New Hampshire Can't Afford to Maintain its Landmarks

Posted on: November 9th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Robert Frost’s farm in Derry, N.H.UPDATE: In June 2007, the state of New Hampshire established a Bureau of Historic Sites, which will oversee funding for the state's landmarks. As for the Frost Farm's roof, trustee Laura Burnham says, "We have not fixed it yet, but we have the money. Hopefully within the next month or so, they’ll be dealing with the roof issue. Things are definitely looking up."

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 9th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Henry Clay Street, New OrleansWhat do you do if you find a prime location for your dream house but an existing house is in the way? Well, you can purchase the house and try to demolish it. This week I went to the New Orleans City Council to speak against a proposal to demolish an undamaged 1890’s Queen Anne style house on Henry Clay Street in the Audubon Park neighborhood so that the owners could build a new "green" house. The couple bought the house for $900,000, and they and their realtor contend that they didn’t realize they would have to get approval from the Housing Conservation District Review Committee (HCDRC) for its demolition. This is a committee that has been around for over seven years to hear demolition cases in historic neighborhoods outside of the local historic districts.

This urge to demolish is especially shocking given that its goal was supposedly sustainability, as it is a complete contradiction of what the green building movement envisions. It would be more responsible to apply green building principles to the current building--exploring ways to conserve energy, preserving its original materials, and ensuring that the building continues to exist for another 100 years. The resources contained in this house will be wasted and lost forever with its demolition.

When the committee unanimously turned them down, they appealed to the City Council. The Council voted unanimously to uphold the HCDRC. It’s hard to believe that in a city that can ill-afford to lose its historic built environment, someone would think nothing of demolishing a sound building in a historic neighborhood—but obviously even post-Katrina New Orleans is not immune from the national tear-downs trend.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.