Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: October 15th, 2007 by Walter Gallas

 

I traveled to Baton Rouge to accept a Historic Preservation Partnership Award presented by Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu to Dick Moe and the National Trust for Historic Preservation as part of the Governor’s Arts Awards. Pam Breaux, Louisiana State Historic Preservation Officer, was also recognized to highlight the very successful partnership between the Trust and the state to gain federal preservation funds for Louisiana and to get over $20 million into the hands of owners of historic houses. The ceremonies took place in Louisiana’s Old State Capitol, a Gothic Revival gem built in the mid-19th century.

The Lieutenant Governor has taken great pains to point out how quickly and transparently his offices have worked to make the grant awards -- drawing a sharp contrast to Governor Blanco’s lumbering Road Home program which is generally discredited and said to be the reason Blanco is not seeking a second term this fall. Elections for Governor, Lieutenant Governor and other statewide and local offices are Saturday, October 20.

Walter Gallas is director of the New Orleans Field Office.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Restoration Blogging

Posted on: October 15th, 2007 by Sarah Heffern

 

Now seems like as good a time as any to mention another blog produced by the National Trust for Historic Preservation: The President Lincoln's Cottage blog. After all, the cottage will be opening to the public in just a few months, and was the subject of a great article in yesterday's New York Times.

President Lincoln's Cottage, described as a 19th century Camp David, is undergoing a complete transformation in preparation for its February debut. Staff at the cottage are writing about the restoration, the history of the Lincoln presidency, the site's role in DC, and more. It's a fun and fascinating look at the creation of a historic site. Check it out.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Hip Hop History

Posted on: October 12th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Harlem YMCAIf a party in Woodstock, N.Y., defined an era, another party in the Bronx four years later planted the seeds of a new one. On Aug. 11, 1973, Clive Campbell and his sister, Cindy, hosted a party in their high-rise at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue. Clive, also known as DJ Kool Herc, mixed and matched records on turn tables as guests in a cramped community room danced the night away. The party swelled, moved into the street, and lasted well into the next morning. That evening, the art form of hip hop, the cultural and musical phenomenon that has permeated virtually every corner of the world, was born.

"It was just a party, intended to be something positive in the community," says Cindy Campbell.

Now the tenants of the 100-unit apartment building where it all began are calling upon this unique history to keep the owner from selling the low-income housing unit to a private investor. The complex was built in 1969 as part of the state-funded Mitchell-Lama program, which created 115,000 units of affordable housing in New York City. But after 20 years in the program, BSR Management, the current owner, is allowed to opt out of the subsidy program and raise rental fees.

The tenants argue that if the building is recognized as a significant historical landmark, its affordable housing status should be preserved. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: October 11th, 2007 by Walter Gallas

 

Rebirth Brass Band, New Orleans, La.The Convention and Visitors Bureau of New Orleans depends heavily on the marketing appeal of crowds parading through the streets of its neighborhoods in a “second line” following a brass band. The occasion can be a happy one when, for example, one of the city’s many Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs comes out on a Sunday, just for the joy of parading. Sometimes the mood is somber, when the crowds gather to remember someone who has passed away.

Last Monday, Rebirth Brass Band snare drummer Derrick Tabb and his brother, trombonist Glen David Andrews, received citations from the New Orleans Police Department for disturbing the peace and parading without a permit. Both learned later at their arraignment that they were also charged with "disturbing the peace by tumultuous manner." The procession was prompted by the death of their friend, a tuba player, the previous week. As the two men’s attorney put it after their appearance in municipal court, the charge "speaks volumes about the disconnect between some officers and the culture of New Orleans.” The two men entered innocent pleas.

Walter Gallas is director of the New Orleans Field Office.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Indiana City, County Battle Over House

Posted on: October 11th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Barnard House, Martinsville, Ind.A historic house in Martinsville, Ind., 30 miles south of Indianapolis, is at the center of a preservation battle that has pitted the city, which wants to save the building, against Morgan County, which has demolished four of the city's historic houses in the past eight years.

Preservationists rallied to meet an August deadline to save the 1870s Barnard House, but the county hasn't yet decided the fate of the two-story brick house, which it bought last October.

Morgan County announced plans to demolish the Barnard House, located just next door to the county administration building, to make way for parking and "future needs that come up,” according to Norman Voyles, county commissioner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.