DOE Approves Two Power Line Corridors

Posted on: October 18th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Fauquier County, Va.The U.S. Deparment of Energy designated two power line corridors earlier this month, to the dismay of environmentalists and preservationists.

There are 55 national parks and 14 heritage areas within the Mid-Atlantic National Interest Electricity Transmission Corridor (NIETC), which the agency approved on Oct. 2. That area also has African-American historic sites, numerous scenic rivers and byways, and the nation's greatest concentration of Civil War battlefields. The other corridor, the Southwest Area Corridor, passes from Arizona to California.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

No Takers for Little Manila Hotel

Posted on: October 17th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Mariposa HotelAfter spending years trying to save one of the last three original buildings of historic Little Manila in Stockton, Calif., the Little Manila Foundation saw the Mariposa Hotel go to auction on Sept. 12—with no takers.

"No one has bought the building yet, and there are no current potential buyers," says Dillon Delvo, co-founder of the foundation. "Stockton has had a record number of foreclosures this year."

Completed in 1922, the 31-room Renaissance revival hotel served as a meeting place for Filipino laborers, who used the building as headquarters for labor strikes of the 1930s and 40s. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lost: Quantico Lustrons

Posted on: October 16th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

LustronThe largest demolition of Lustron houses began this week.

Built in the 1950s, 34 all-steel houses on the U.S. Marine Corps Base in Quantico, Va., will soon be reduced to rubble, despite preservationists' request to salvage materials.

"I'm really disappointed. It's just a huge loss for Lustron owners across the country," says Todd Zeiger, director the Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana's northern regional office. "You can't make these parts anymore."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Reducing Water Consumption in Historic Buildings

Posted on: October 16th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

  1. Plant Only Native Plants - Naturescaping
    Native plantings typically reduce maintenance costs over their lifetime by minimizing inputs of fertilizers, pesticides and water. Whenever you are planting flowers or vegetation in non-historic landscapes, utilize native plantings - this is called “naturescaping”. Contact your local nursery or go to www.plantnative.org. Have you heard about Xeriscaping? It’s a comprehensive approach to planting and gardening. See www.xeriscape.org.
  2. Evaluate Your Irrigation System
    Install low-volume micro-irrigation for gardens, trees and shrubs. Micro-irrigation includes drip (also known as trickle), micro spray jets, micro-sprinklers, or bubbler irrigation to irrigate slowly and minimize evaporation, runoff, and overspray. Ensure that there are no leaks in your irrigation equipment.
  3. Evaluate Your Fountains
    Do not install or use ornamental water features unless they recycle the water. Use signs to show the public that water is recycled. Do not operate during a drought.
    ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: October 15th, 2007 by Walter Gallas

 

I traveled to Baton Rouge to accept a Historic Preservation Partnership Award presented by Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu to Dick Moe and the National Trust for Historic Preservation as part of the Governor’s Arts Awards. Pam Breaux, Louisiana State Historic Preservation Officer, was also recognized to highlight the very successful partnership between the Trust and the state to gain federal preservation funds for Louisiana and to get over $20 million into the hands of owners of historic houses. The ceremonies took place in Louisiana’s Old State Capitol, a Gothic Revival gem built in the mid-19th century.

The Lieutenant Governor has taken great pains to point out how quickly and transparently his offices have worked to make the grant awards -- drawing a sharp contrast to Governor Blanco’s lumbering Road Home program which is generally discredited and said to be the reason Blanco is not seeking a second term this fall. Elections for Governor, Lieutenant Governor and other statewide and local offices are Saturday, October 20.

Walter Gallas is director of the New Orleans Field Office.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.