Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 23rd, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

City Park Carousel, New OrleansI attended a reception at City Park this past Friday evening for donors who had supported the repair of its 101-year-old carousel and pavilion. A permanent plaque was unveiled which included acknowledgment of the National Trust and the Mitchell and Favrot funds. The plaque sits immediately below the one which is a brass image of the 1989 National Preservation Award recognizing the earlier restoration of the carousel. The carousel is operating again just in time for City Park’s Celebration in the Oaks, a beloved holiday tradition which begins this week. The Favrots and Mitchells visited the carousel in May when they were here, and saw the work underway. Now, it’s complete.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Giving Thanks for Carbon Offsets

Posted on: November 22nd, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

1911 Dutch Colonial in the Delaware District, Buffalo, NYGratitude

An article in the NY Times on Thanksgiving encouraged readers to keep a “gratitude journal” reporting that just by writing down the things that you are thankful for you will become happier. A doctor once told me if you smile as soon as you wake up, that will make you happier. I think both suggestions really are just positive reinforcements – if you think about being happy you can become happy.

I thought a lot about being happy as I drove the 450 miles from my home in the Cleveland Park neighborhood of Washington DC to my sister’s 1911 Dutch Colonial house in Buffalo, NY the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. I listened to Radiohead, Dave Matthews Band and even yoga chanting to keep from going into continuous road rage. I had hoped to leave at 1pm so that the 8 hour drive would get me to Buffalo by 9 pm, getting through most of the Pennsylvania mountains in the daylight. Unfortunately, I loaded my Subaru Forester in front of my Art Deco apartment building – with luggage, wine and my cats – to then back over a sewer cover which gave me a flat tire. Leaving at 4pm then put me on the Beltway right in the middle of rush hour – and 2 hours later I had only gone 50 miles and was still in the DC Metro area. This really got me thinking a lot about the carbon impact of all those cars, every day and the 40% population increase projected for the DC area in the next 10 years.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

St. Louis Suburb Fights McMansion Trend

Posted on: November 21st, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

kirkwoodh.jpgIt all started with a little old lady's house and a few red signs.

In the suburban St. Louis town of Kirkwood, Mo., 80-year-old Helen Ballard's 1924 Tudor revival was being sold to a developer with plans to tear it down for a larger house.

It was the last straw for neighbors like Tad Skelton, who had watched eight houses fall for new ones in one of the town's two national historic districts. Skelton and others planted red plastic signs in their yards, protesting the teardown trend. Today 550 front yards in the town of 27,000 display the "Protect Historic Kirkwood" signs.

"They misled the woman. That's what really put people off," Skelton says. "Instead of one letter to the local newspaper, these signs were there day after day. You couldn't forget about it." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 20th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Mrs. Mildred Bennett, seated, her daughter behind her and her grandaughter giving her a kiss on move-in day, October 3.Mildred Bennett’s extended family came together on Friday for a joyous celebration of her life and influence. I was asked to say a few words at the funeral service on behalf of the National Trust and the Preservation Resource Center. After the funeral service, the hearse and the procession slowly passed her house on Dauphine on the way to the cemetery.

That afternoon and into the evening the house was filled with family and friends and kids underfoot, the backyard was jammed with tables and chairs, and the kitchen was filled with food.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Spokane's Art Deco Theater Reopens

Posted on: November 20th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

Spokane’s Fox TheatreTuxedos, red carpets, antique cars—the scene at Saturday's grand reopening of the 1931 Fox Theatre in Spokane, Wash., was a scene from old Hollywood.

"It was a great party," says Joanne Moyer, National Trust advisor. "We've had a real renaissance in downtown Spokane."

Katharine Hepburn, Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong once performed at the art deco theater, designed by Robert Reamer.

Seven years ago, the National Register-listed theater, along with its neighborhood, had become shabby, and it was slated to be torn down for a parking lot. "The community rallied to provide the initial funds to buy the building," Moyer says. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.