Chicago's "American Idol of Preservation" Winners Announced

Posted on: November 14th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

onleongh.jpgThe Viking Ship won.

The results of the second American Express Partners in Preservation popularity contest are in. In what's been dubbed the "American Idol for Preservation," Chicago-area voters had five weeks to cast an online vote for their favorite from a list of 25 historic structures, including a 115-year-old replica of a Viking Ship in Raven, Ill.

Announced yesterday, each of the 15 winners will receive grants totaling $1 million; even the 10 sites that were not selected will get $5,000. A Chinatown building, On Leong Merchant Association Building (Pui Tak Center), won the most votes. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley served on the advisory committee, which, along with executives from American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, selected the other 14 projects.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Rescuing an Icon, Part Three

Posted on: November 14th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

A story of how a typical business trip turned into a tale of disaster management of national importance…

(Editor’s Note: Originally written in August for her personal blog, Barbara Campagna has agreed to share the story of her experience at the Farnsworth House in Plano, IL, as the floodwaters from the Fox River approached.)

Saturday, August 25th, 2007

The Farnsworth House, Plano, ILSaturday morning found us back at Farnsworth House with no further rains the night before. We took the boat out again and checked the house, emptied out the melting ice in the freezer, took more photos and then motored around the site to see how the trees and landscape had fared. There were many trees and branches floating in the water, fish swimming where only bushes and flowers should be and the pedestrian bridge from the Visitor Center was completely submerged. Still, we sighed happily that no water had breached the doors into the house. Whitney and I finished our day by writing down all we could think of that would be important for future disasters. And I drove back to Midway, happy to be going home and happier still that our precious resource had been saved - at least this time!!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

University of Missouri Begins Work on Neglected 19th-Century Stone House

Posted on: November 13th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Hickman HouseAbandoned for three decades, one of Missouri's oldest stone houses, located two miles from the beginning of the Santa Fe Trail, is now on its way to being restored.

Last month, work began on the 1819 Thomas Hickman House, now part of the 600-acre University of Missouri-Columbia's research farm near New Franklin, Mo.

The university, which has owned the Hickman House since the 1950s, has raised $1.25 million for the restoration project, thanks in part to a matching grant of $250,000 from Save America's Treasures, a public-private partnership between the National Park Service and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

News from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 13th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Mrs. Mildred Bennett, seated, her daughter behind her and her grandaughter giving her a kiss on move-in day, October 3.Sad news from the field, today.

Mildred Bennett died peacefully at her home in Holy Cross early Sunday morning. Mrs. Bennett’s house was one of the first targets of the HOME AGAIN! New Orleans program, offering technical and financial assistance to owners of houses in flooded historic neighborhoods. Donna Duplantier expressed gratitude that her grandmother was able to return to her house, built in 1884, on Dauphine Street. Mrs. Bennett had moved back into her house on October 3. She was 90 years old.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sun, Sand, Sustainability…And Sprawl Too!

Posted on: November 10th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

Fort San Geronimo, Caribe Hilton, San JuanI just returned from 10 days of conferences – a week in San Juan for the APT Conference followed by 3 days at the Greenbuild Conference in Chicago. Both conferences energized me and made me so proud to be playing a professional role in the climate change discussion.

APT (the Association for Preservation Technology) is one of the National Trust’s primary partners in the Sustainable Preservation Coalition – a coalition of national organizations responsible for developing policies and best practices who have joined together to create national policy on the intersection of historic preservation and sustainable practices. This APT Conference was also my final conference as President of the organization, and I was thrilled to be the president at the most successful and highly attended conference ever in the organization’s 39 years. This was also our first off-shore conference which proved that “curb appeal” of conferences is as important if not more important than intellectual content!! We had 729 attendees, far more than the 200 we had originally planned as the breakeven number.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.