Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: December 20th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

An apparently-sound house on the salvage list at the owner’s request.I recently spent an afternoon in the field with FEMA historic preservation staff assessing buildings for selective salvage. This was the latest group of 37 contributing properties on the demolition list. There are still many more to come as they are presented by the city and evaluated by FEMA. Michelle Kimball of PRC, and Wilbur Walker, PRC’s warehouse manager also took a shift. While there were buildings which clearly warrant demolition, we also saw a few that we questioned—either because they appeared to be structurally sound or because they were cases of pre-Katrina blight (which means FEMA recovery funds shouldn’t be paying for their demolition).

Repaired & occupied house still on the salvage list.We also visited a house in the Gentilly Terrace neighborhood which was still on the list, even though it was repaired and occupied. I sent an email to FEMA with our challenges. The materials salvaged from these houses will go to the Preservation Resource Center warehouse for PRC and Trust projects and also for public sale.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

A Report from the Greenbuild Conference in Chicago – Part 2

Posted on: December 19th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

Presenting the Sustainability Initiative of the National Trust

Two colleagues and I presented the Sustainability Initiative of the National Trust to a room of 250+ Greenbuild-goers on Friday, November 9th. The large number in attendanclincoln-cottage.jpge was a great relief and an indication, I think, that interest in the intersection of historic preservation and green building is not limited or marginalized to the choir of preservationists who have been singing that tune for the past few years. I began the session by asking how many in attendance consider themselves to be preservation professionals – and only a handful raised their hands. But when I asked how many were National Trust members, the hands of about 2/3 of the attendees enthusiastically shot up. Maybe more people are listening than we realize.

We have a multi-component work plan but below are the key issues we presented.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

New Plans for Pennsylvania's 1872 Star Barn

Posted on: December 19th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

Star BarnOne of the most memorable barns in Pennsylvania has a new owner who plans to move the 1872 Gothic revival structure to a rural site and restore it as an "agricultural expo center."

Seven years ago, to protect the Star Barn and its ancillary buildings from encroaching development, the nonprofit Preservation Pennsylvania bought its 3.6-acre property, listed it on the National Register of Historic Places, and waited for the right owner.

On Friday, the Star Barn property will be sold to Agrarian Country, a nonprofit based in Middletown, Pa., three miles from the barn.

"The Star Barn is just part of a larger plan for Agrarian Country to establish a showcase for agriculture in Pennsylvania," says company president Robert S. Barr, who has restored other historic buildings in the area. "When we move it and convert to a commercial building, we'll fix it up so it'll be available for shows, dinners, banquets, and community theater groups," Barr says. "From the outside, it'll look identical."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lost: Las Vegas Casino

Posted on: December 18th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

New Frontier HotelIn typical Las Vegas style, a 1942 casino was imploded last month after an extravagant fireworks display.

Thousands of tourists watched the 2:00 a.m. demolition on Nov. 13, cheering the demise of the New Frontier Hotel, where Elvis Presley made his Las Vegas debut in 1956 and the Supremes made their final performance in 1970.

The 16-story hotel, located on the Strip, will make way for the Plaza Las Vegas resort, a replica of New York's landmark hotel.

In May, El Ad Properties, an Israel-based company that bought the Plaza Hotel two years ago, paid a record $1.2 billion for the 986-room hotel and its 36 acres. The New Frontier closed in July.

Watch a video of the implosion >>

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Coppola Topples "Unsightly" 1970s Building

Posted on: December 17th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Inglenook ChateauNapa Valley residents called it an eyesore and a monstrosity. And now a 1970s building is on the way to disappearing from a historic winery in Rutherford, Calif.

Last week, Francis Ford Coppola, who owns the 235-acre Rubicon Estate and its buildings, began the six-week process of demolishing its concrete barrel cellar, which he calls "huge and unsightly."

The Heublein Corporation, Inc., the former owner of the estate, began building the $3 million barrel building in 1973, blocking roadside views of winery founder Gustave Niebaum's 19th-century mansion.

"Over the 32 years of our ownership, I've often thought to myself when I had to make an important decision, 'What would Gustave Niebaum do?'" Coppola said in a Dec. 13 statement. "I find the heritage of this estate a constant source of inspiration as we move forward."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.