Arizona Man Has Plan for 1913 Harvey House

Posted on: December 13th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Harvey House, Seligman, Ariz.An Arizona hotel might have a shot at seeing another year.

When the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad announced its plans to demolish the 1913 Havasu Hotel, which it abandoned in 1989, locals publicized the threat to one of the last historic buildings in tiny Seligman, Ariz., 80 miles west of Flagstaff. The Arizona Preservation Foundation put the Harvey House on this year's list of the state's most endangered places.

A "Harvey House," the hotel is one of an 80-building chain of railroad hotels and restaurants that entrepreneur Fred Harvey built throughout the West. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

New Look for Palm Springs Modern Hotel

Posted on: December 12th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Del Marcos HotelPalm Springs has become a hotspot for fans of mid-century modern architecture, inspiring restorations of the city's rare collection of Rat Pack-era buildings.

This fall, the new owners of the 1947 Del Marcos Hotel completed a renovation of the 16-room inn, designed by desert architect William F. Cody.

The hotel reopened in September after workers updated the lobby, installed new restrooms, and created a saltwater pool complete with piped-in music. "It's back to A-plus condition," says Jack Davis, manager and partner in the company that bought the hotel last year.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: December 12th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 3 Comments

 

With last week’s report that the demolition of four public housing developments—B. W. Cooper, Lafitte, C. J. Peete and St. Bernard—could begin on December 15, the temperature rose this week among groups trying to delay or even stop the demolitions. I joined a diverse group of ministers, community members, activists and public housing residents at a meeting of the City Council, where we were allowed to address the Council even though the demolitions were not on the agenda. My remarks to the Council pointed out that there had been no meaningful consideration of alternatives in the federally mandated consultation process with HUD and the Housing Authority of New Orleans about the redevelopment plans.

Unfortunately, any good will that the group might have gained from the Council was lost when a number of group members refused to disband after our time was up and tied up the chambers with chats of “No demolition!” until police came to break things up.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Last Frank Lloyd Wright Hotel on Track for 2010 Reopening

Posted on: December 10th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mason City, IowaWork is under way at the last remaining hotel Frank Lloyd Wright designed, the Park Inn Hotel in Mason City, Iowa, which has been closed since 1972.

Wright designed the Park Inn Hotel and adjacent City National Bank in 1910.

In September, Wright on the Park, Inc., the organization that is overseeing the work, bought the City National Bank, coming a step closer to fulfilling its mission to "own, restore, preserve, and maintain" the hotel and bank building.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: December 10th, 2007 by Walter Gallas

 

I attended along with a number of other PRC staffers the official public unveiling of housing designs for Brad Pitt’s “Make It Right” project in the Lower 9th Ward. Thirteen architectural firms from around the world submitted designs, from which a homeowner can choose. The plan is to build at least 150 new houses for the owners of houses lost nearest the levee breach, to raise money internationally to fill the owner’s financial gap, to begin construction in the spring, and to have some houses built by next summer. For a look at the designs, and to learn more, go to www.makeitrightnola.org.

The media attention was phenomenal, not just because of Pitt’s drawing power, but also because of how the project was tied in with an outdoor art installation of 150 full-size house forms covered in hot pink fabric scattered about the site of the future new houses. This installation is illuminated at night and is open as a drive-through tour through January 7.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.