Tomb of the Unknowns Update: Study Requires "Highly Experienced Specialists"

Posted on: March 21st, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Shortly before Congress and President Bush enacted the temporary reprieve for the historic monument, the Army announced that it had “decided to pause” its effort to replace and discard the historic Tomb Monument “until … Congress has the opportunity to review the report.” The report is due at the end of July 2008.

In the meantime, the Army also announced that it was “considering repair of the Tomb Monument’s cracks[.] … If implemented, the repair … is part of the cyclical maintenance that is needed to preserve the Tomb Monument while we continue to explore long-term options.” Given the Army’s stubborn insistence that replacement is necessary, this announcement – under political pressure from Congress and thousands of Americans – is not reassuring to preservationists.

On March 13, therefore, the National Trust for Historic Preservation cautioned the Army and Department of Veterans Affairs that it is imperative that the personnel tasked with conducting the new study of the Tomb Monument be highly experienced specialists in the conservation of marble. For example, this expert must conduct technically sophisticated tests to assess the structural integrity of the monument, evaluate the feasibility of repairing the monument, and prepare cost estimates for repair versus replacement.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Live in Maine? Got Old Windows? Check out this workshop

Posted on: March 21st, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

A historic window repair workshop is planned for the 3rd of April in Farmington, Maine.  The workshop will be given by Maine Preservation -- you can learn more at http://morningsentinel.mainetoday.com/news/local/4883470.html

Those old windows can be made more energy efficient than you might think.  In fact, a study commissioned by NCPTT found that when repaired and weatherized properly, historic wood windows can be almost as energy efficient as new, thermally resistant windows.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Historic Green

Posted on: March 20th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Deconstruction of rear addition of property in the 5100 block of Dauphine Street in Holy Cross.For most of this month Historic Green is in town, an ambitious initiative which is combining the values of the historic preservation movement with those of the green building/sustainability movement. Last Saturday, Emily Wadhams, our Vice President of Public Policy, spoke about the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Sustainability Initiative at a forum that was part of Historic Green’s activities in the Lower 9th Ward.

The deconstruction of 5200 Dauphine Street in Holy Cross.Also on the program were Rick Fedrizzi, president and CEO of the U.S. Green Building Council; Bill Dupont, UT-San Antonio professor and Trust consultant; and Rick and Hazel Denhart of Mercy Corps. The audience consisted of about 50 or 60 volunteers in town to work on various projects primarily in Holy Cross, including the deconstruction of some Preservation Resource Center Operation Comeback projects, which Emily, Bill, and I visited after the presentations.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Controversial Demolitions Continue

Posted on: March 17th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Demolition is underway at the St. Bernard housing project. Emily Wadhams, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Vice President of Public Policy, and I visited the four housing developments on Friday and Saturday to see the demolition progress.

At St. Bernard, we engaged a demolition worker in a discussion of why demolition was the best thing, as we watched a building come down in front of us. He had lived in the St. Thomas housing developments. He told us about the sense of entitlement that residents feel about returning to their particular apartment in the developments. He said the only thing that could break this would be the removal of the places themselves. The former residents, he said, could never abide seeing others move into these buildings, even though they represented so much hardship and poverty and crime. Again—the persistent argument that the buildings—and not the policies of the past—are the problem.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Going 'Green' at Home: Part II

Posted on: March 13th, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

In a follow-up to their article on greening homes (see post from 3/4/2008) the Wall Street Journal is asking readers to write in and share advice on how they greened their home.   

Now's your time to shine -- write in with advice for your fellow historic homeowners.   I'll keep track of the postings... and generate a list of good ideas to post on this blog.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.