Happy RSS Awareness Day!

Posted on: May 1st, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

RSS Awareness DayWhat is RSS? No, not some scary anti-preservation legislation -- it's Really Simple Syndication, and it will change the way you use the Internet. The folks putting on RSS Awareness Day have created a handy page where you can watch a video about what RSS is and how it works. In a nutshell, you choose a newsreader site (like netvibes or iGoogle), sign up for syndication feeds from the sites you like, and whenever there is new information posted it comes to your personal page. It's the easiest way possible to know when something is new in PreservationNation.

We offer several options for feeds here on the blog, including a feed for the entire site, as well as specialized feeds our most popular topics, sustainability/green preservation and Gulf Coast recovery. On the main PreservationNation website, you can subscribe to Today's News from Preservation magazine; Preservation in the News, a daily roundup of media stories about preservation; or a listing of current job opportunities with the National Trust for Historic Preservation -- or all three!

There are several other blogs within the PreservationNation family that also offer RSS feeds:

Oh, and though you can't use RSS to do it, you can also become a subscriber to PreservationNation's brand-new YouTube Channel and learn about our new videos as soon as they are posted.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Notes from the Field: Preservation & Redevelopment of Historic Fort Monroe

Posted on: April 29th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Fort Monroe is scheduled to close in 2011. (Citizens for a Fort Monroe National Park)Fort Monroe is an early 19th century stone fortress with moat located on Hampton Roads at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The 570-acre military post has served the nation as a coastal defense work and artillery school, and is active today as the home of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. Fort Monroe played a key role in hastening the end of slavery, as the first refuge for escaped “Contraband” slaves. Like Mount Vernon and Monticello, Fort Monroe is a one of our country’s 2,500 designated National Historic Landmarks.

In 2011, the Army will vacate Fort Monroe, pursuant to the Base Realignment and Closure Act. Fort Monroe will automatically revert to the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Since 2005, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has been intensively engaged in advocacy and historic preservation planning for Fort Monroe. The National Trust has participated as a member of the City of Hampton’s master plan steering committee and the Fort Monroe Federal Area Development Authority’s historic preservation advisory group. We also participate as a consulting party to the Section 106 review process pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act, which is ably led by the Army and Virginia Department of Historic Resources.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation and many others are working now to envision a bright future for Fort Monroe and to explore the most effective historic preservation strategies for the benefit of the public. To that end, the National Trust has joined with four statewide and national preservation organizations to express our shared perspective on the future of Fort Monroe. Our shared position is described in an April 18, 2008 letter to the Fort Monroe Federal Area Development Authority from the National Trust, APVA – Preservation Virginia, Civil War Preservation Trust, and National Parks Conservation Association.

There is an active debate about the preservation of Fort Monroe. We welcome your comments on our shared letter and the future of Fort Monroe.

-- Rob Nieweg

Rob Nieweg is the Director of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Southern Field Office

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Notes from New Orleans: Upholding Traditions

Posted on: April 28th, 2008 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Mardi Gras Indians probably best represent the complexity of New Orleans culture, a tradition with Native American and African roots that flourishes in a city which more often looks to the Carribean than to North America and Europe for its creative inspiration. A few of the Mardi Gras Indians paraded a few Sundays ago, from Bayou St. John down Orleans to Claiborne Avenue by the Lafitte housing development. Their Uptown counterparts paraded last month in the vicinity of the C. J. Peete housing development. The Indian suits are vibrant works of art, made of complex beadwork and feathers which in bright sunlight are almost blinding in their brilliance.

Mardi Gras Indians

The tradition is said to harken back to the 19th century, when African Americans began costuming as Indians as a way to honor the Indians who had provided shelter to run-away slaves. The powerful influence of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show could also have had a part.

The day proved that the city is alive and well when it comes to upholding some of its most strongly entrenched traditions.

Mardi Gras Indians

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Video: Nine Mile Canyon at Risk

Posted on: April 25th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Learn more -- and take action -- at www.preservationnation.org/nine-mile-canyon.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Notes from New Orleans: Sandbags & Missed Opportunity

Posted on: April 25th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

sandbagsAs the waters of the Mississippi rose to their expected crest in New Orleans, I passed some workers of the New Orleans Levee Board this weekend putting sandbags along a stretch of the French Quarter riverfront where that water was lapping away at exposed earth. About 30 miles upriver, millions of gallons of river water are being diverted to Lake Pontchartrain through the Bonne Carre Spillway in an effort to keep the volume of water passing New Orleans at a desired 1.25 million cubic feet per second.

sandbagsIt was noted in the press how a golden opportunity is being missed to use all the diverted sediment now coursing through the Bonne Carre spillway into Lake Pontchartrain and passing the city to be dumped in the Gulf of Mexico. Years of talk about water diversion plans to re-build the wetlands have resulted in very little implementation due to lags in funding.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.