Notes from New Orleans: Historic Green

Posted on: March 20th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Deconstruction of rear addition of property in the 5100 block of Dauphine Street in Holy Cross.For most of this month Historic Green is in town, an ambitious initiative which is combining the values of the historic preservation movement with those of the green building/sustainability movement. Last Saturday, Emily Wadhams, our Vice President of Public Policy, spoke about the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Sustainability Initiative at a forum that was part of Historic Green’s activities in the Lower 9th Ward.

The deconstruction of 5200 Dauphine Street in Holy Cross.Also on the program were Rick Fedrizzi, president and CEO of the U.S. Green Building Council; Bill Dupont, UT-San Antonio professor and Trust consultant; and Rick and Hazel Denhart of Mercy Corps. The audience consisted of about 50 or 60 volunteers in town to work on various projects primarily in Holy Cross, including the deconstruction of some Preservation Resource Center Operation Comeback projects, which Emily, Bill, and I visited after the presentations.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Controversial Demolitions Continue

Posted on: March 17th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Demolition is underway at the St. Bernard housing project. Emily Wadhams, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Vice President of Public Policy, and I visited the four housing developments on Friday and Saturday to see the demolition progress.

At St. Bernard, we engaged a demolition worker in a discussion of why demolition was the best thing, as we watched a building come down in front of us. He had lived in the St. Thomas housing developments. He told us about the sense of entitlement that residents feel about returning to their particular apartment in the developments. He said the only thing that could break this would be the removal of the places themselves. The former residents, he said, could never abide seeing others move into these buildings, even though they represented so much hardship and poverty and crime. Again—the persistent argument that the buildings—and not the policies of the past—are the problem.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Going 'Green' at Home: Part II

Posted on: March 13th, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

In a follow-up to their article on greening homes (see post from 3/4/2008) the Wall Street Journal is asking readers to write in and share advice on how they greened their home.   

Now's your time to shine -- write in with advice for your fellow historic homeowners.   I'll keep track of the postings... and generate a list of good ideas to post on this blog.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Upcoming Event: Whose Carbon is it Anyway?

Posted on: March 13th, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

The  National Building Museum is offering what promises to be a good discussion about how to tackle the thorniest of carbon problems -- all that carbon that is released into the atmosphere by constructing and using buildings.   See the announcement below. Hope some preservation-minded folks will be able to make the event -- and speak up about the importance of reusing our existing buildings.   (Unfortunately, I'll be on a plane to Seattle, driving up my own carbon footprint.)   See the NBM website for details.

Tuesday, March 18
Whose Carbon is it Anyway?
6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
As the creation and maintenance of buildings creates over 40% of the carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere every year, who is going to take the lead in finding solutions? Opening Remarks: Harriet Tregoning, Director, DC Office of Planning. A discussion with: Scott Barrett, Director, International Policy Program; Professor of Environmental Economics and International Political Economy, SAIS at Johns Hopkins University • Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post Journalist (moderator) • Rainer Hascher, Co-founder, Hascher Jehle Architektur, Germany • Melissa Lavinson, Director, Federal Environmental Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, PG&E Corporation •Fran Pavley, Former Assemblywoman, State of California 1.5 LU (AIA) 1.5 CFE (ASLA) 1.5 CM (AICP)

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

California May Close 48 State Parks

Posted on: March 7th, 2008 by Preservation magazine 14 Comments

 

Monte de Oro State Park, Steve SierenFrom the Redwoods to the beaches, parts of California soon may be inaccessible to visitors.

Under the cloud of the Golden State's current fiscal crisis, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger recently asked each department and agency in the state to reduce its budget by up to 10 percent. The Department of Parks and Recreation came up with a proposal that sent a shock wave through the state: Close 48 state parks and reduce lifeguards at some beaches to cut $8.8 million from the 2008-2009 state budget.

Grassroots campaigns in dozens of shocked communities, including the town of Benicia near San Francisco, are calling for alternatives to closing prized resources like Benicia State Recreation Area and Benicia Capitol Historic Park. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.