Home Again: Audrey Smith is Back in her Shotgun

Posted on: July 27th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Special for the National Trust for Historic Preservation by Alex Lemann

Mrs. Smith remains bullish about her street’s prospects for recovery. (Photo by Alex Lemann)When Audrey Smith first made contact with the National Trust Emergency Assistance Team in the spring of 2006, she had already been working on her house for months. Although she was living in Gretna and her neighborhood was still closed to permanent residents, Mrs. Smith began work on her house only a month after the storm, making the trip to Holy Cross on weekends with her son to clear out waterlogged furniture, gut the house, and do whatever they could to help her get home. After Kevin Mercadel, program officer for the National Trust’s New Orleans Field Office, conducted a site visit for Mrs. Smith in May and helped draw up a scope of work for her house, she quickly took over, hiring a contractor and putting her scanty insurance and FEMA money to work. “We were really impressed by her drive,” Kevin says. “She used our report with the limited funds she had, and she took charge of the project herself.”

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Houston Victorian Razed for "Victorian Classic"

Posted on: July 26th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Detail of the overgrown Doyle House, which was bulldozed on July 18, 2007. (Greater Houston Preservation Alliance)Last week, a day before a rally to protest the possible demolition of a 101-year-old Victorian in Houston, a local builder tore down the house to make way for a new Victorian-style mansion.

At a meeting earlier this month, local architect Harry James had told the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance that he would be willing to sell the house for $900,000—more than triple its 2007 appraisal of $290,000.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Last Summer for D.C. Diner?

Posted on: July 25th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Special to Preservation magazine by Jimmy Scarano

The Waffle Shop’s lease expires in September, and an office building is planned for the block. (Jimmy Scarano)

With plans for a high-rise office complex in the works, Washington, D.C., is in danger of losing the Waffle Shop, the sole survivor of a local six-restaurant chain that opened in the 1950s.

The classic diner, built in 1950, is one of the few remaining examples of moderne style in the city. The storefront showcases the original neon signage and stainless-steel frames, and inside the decor includes mosaic tiles and vintage horseshoe countertops.

But with its lease expiring in September, the Waffle Shop's days may be numbered.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Landmark Status Recommended for Felix the Cat

Posted on: July 24th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

The Los Angeles city council will make the final decision later this year on designating the 1948 sign, which is attached to a 1920 showroom. (Ed Fuentes/ViewFromaLoft)Proving that cats always land on their feet, a 49-year-old neon sign in Los Angeles inched closer to historic designation earlier this month.

The city's Cultural Heritage Commission voted 4-1 on July 12 to recommend the Felix Chevrolet sign for designation as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument. At the meeting, however, representatives of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and a city councilmember opposed the designation, saying it could impede development of the area.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Vermont Church Falls

Posted on: July 23rd, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

The original church, built in 1876, was razed for a new parish hall. (Holy Trinity Episcopal Church)The first Episcopal church in Swanton, Vt., was demolished this month.

Built in 1876, the American Gothic church was in they way of a new parish hall.

The congregation voted to tear down the building for a new one adjacent to the 1909 marble church used for services.

A local inn keeper wanted to move the building to save it, but church officials wanted to stay on schedule to complete the building by next summer.

The National Trust twice named the State of Vermont to its list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places, in 1993 and 2004.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Discovery at 180-Year-Old Vermont Inn

Posted on: July 19th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

The inn remains open during the $1.5 million update. (Middlebury Inn)You never know what you'll find when you renovate a historic hotel.

Last month, during a $1.5 million renovation of the Middlebury Inn in Middlebury, Vt., workers uncovered one of the original entrances to the hotel, built in 1827.

"When they were dismantling the wall, lo and behold, we started to see a finished brick opening," says Jeff Costello, general manager, who watched the June 19 discovery. "It was really intriguing. When we saw that, we changed the whole scope of the project."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.