Emergency Reprieve for the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers Stalled in Congress

Posted on: November 15th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

A temporary reprieve for the endangered Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers may be delayed as Congress debates the National Defense Authorization Bill:

An informal House-Senate conference committee was at a standstill late Wednesday on the annual defense authorization bill, amid a dispute over a domestic policy provision.

The sticking point was a Senate-passed provision that would expand race-based hate-crime laws ...

With no resolution late Wednesday on whether to keep the provision in the draft conference report, the goal of clearing the bill for the president’s signature by week’s end was at risk.

Congressional Quarterly, November 14, 2008
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Senators Daniel Akaka and Jim Webb have championed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Bill that would require much-needed study and a report to Congress before the Army could proceed with its misguided plan to replace the historic Tomb Monument. Although the Akaka-Webb amendment was unanimously adopted by the Senate, the National Defense Authorization Bill is now tied up in conference.

Thanks to the passionate grassroots outcry and pressure from Congress, the Army let pass its own September 29 deadline for replacing the monument. However, unfortunately, there is no indication that the Army has reversed its decision to replace.

We're continuing to press decision-makers to save the Tomb. We urge concerned Americans to contact John C. Metzler, Superintendent of Arlington National Cemetery.

-- Robert Nieweg

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 15th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Baton Rouge High SchoolI spoke at a community meeting in Baton Rouge called by a neighborhood organization to hear about the Baton Rouge school board’s plans for Baton Rouge High School, built in 1926 and individually listed in the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to the Trust, the preservation side was very ably represented by the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, and the Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation, two long-time Trust partners.

The school board has appointed a sub-committee, which is charged with making a recommendation by early next year on the school’s future. There is plenty of support in the community and among alumni and students to save the school, but financing the school’s renovation will be a challenge. Many communities around the country have dealt with similar situations, and the National Trust will continue to be a resource and advocate for historic preservation and creative renovation of the school.

Walter Gallas is director of the New Orleans Field Office.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

A Report from the Greenbuild Conference in Chicago – Part 1

Posted on: November 14th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

The Pritzker Pavilion, Millennium Park, Chicago, ILNovember 7th-9th, 2007

In only 7 years, the US Green Building Conference’s Annual conference, Greenbuild, has grown to become one of the largest conferences in our field, with over 25,000 people attending this year. The irony of bringing so many people together from around the hemisphere to discuss how to limit our human role in climate change, is not lost on me, or most of the other attendees I would guess. I will happily stay in denial over how much extra carbon is inflicted on the world by such a huge gathering. How many miles of ice loss at the poles or Greenland could be traced to the gathering of this group? But what’s the alternative? Do we become hermits and never leave our homes? The answer to protection of our world can’t be that we lose all human contact because then why bother? What’s the most sustainable world? Well, probably one without us in it….

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Chicago's "American Idol of Preservation" Winners Announced

Posted on: November 14th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

onleongh.jpgThe Viking Ship won.

The results of the second American Express Partners in Preservation popularity contest are in. In what's been dubbed the "American Idol for Preservation," Chicago-area voters had five weeks to cast an online vote for their favorite from a list of 25 historic structures, including a 115-year-old replica of a Viking Ship in Raven, Ill.

Announced yesterday, each of the 15 winners will receive grants totaling $1 million; even the 10 sites that were not selected will get $5,000. A Chinatown building, On Leong Merchant Association Building (Pui Tak Center), won the most votes. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley served on the advisory committee, which, along with executives from American Express and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, selected the other 14 projects.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Rescuing an Icon, Part Three

Posted on: November 14th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

A story of how a typical business trip turned into a tale of disaster management of national importance…

(Editor’s Note: Originally written in August for her personal blog, Barbara Campagna has agreed to share the story of her experience at the Farnsworth House in Plano, IL, as the floodwaters from the Fox River approached.)

Saturday, August 25th, 2007

The Farnsworth House, Plano, ILSaturday morning found us back at Farnsworth House with no further rains the night before. We took the boat out again and checked the house, emptied out the melting ice in the freezer, took more photos and then motored around the site to see how the trees and landscape had fared. There were many trees and branches floating in the water, fish swimming where only bushes and flowers should be and the pedestrian bridge from the Visitor Center was completely submerged. Still, we sighed happily that no water had breached the doors into the house. Whitney and I finished our day by writing down all we could think of that would be important for future disasters. And I drove back to Midway, happy to be going home and happier still that our precious resource had been saved - at least this time!!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.