Notes from the Field: New Orleans

Posted on: November 20th, 2007 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Mrs. Mildred Bennett, seated, her daughter behind her and her grandaughter giving her a kiss on move-in day, October 3.Mildred Bennett’s extended family came together on Friday for a joyous celebration of her life and influence. I was asked to say a few words at the funeral service on behalf of the National Trust and the Preservation Resource Center. After the funeral service, the hearse and the procession slowly passed her house on Dauphine on the way to the cemetery.

That afternoon and into the evening the house was filled with family and friends and kids underfoot, the backyard was jammed with tables and chairs, and the kitchen was filled with food.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Spokane's Art Deco Theater Reopens

Posted on: November 20th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

Spokane’s Fox TheatreTuxedos, red carpets, antique cars—the scene at Saturday's grand reopening of the 1931 Fox Theatre in Spokane, Wash., was a scene from old Hollywood.

"It was a great party," says Joanne Moyer, National Trust advisor. "We've had a real renaissance in downtown Spokane."

Katharine Hepburn, Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong once performed at the art deco theater, designed by Robert Reamer.

Seven years ago, the National Register-listed theater, along with its neighborhood, had become shabby, and it was slated to be torn down for a parking lot. "The community rallied to provide the initial funds to buy the building," Moyer says. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sharing the Vision: Best Practices to Preserve Our Future

Posted on: November 20th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

(Editor's Note: the Cleveland Restoration Society is a member of the State and Local Partners program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.)

Northeast Ohio is rich in historic assets. Like many American cities that thrived during the industrial revolution, Cleveland and its surrounding region built a remarkable architectural landscape on the foundation of businesses and factories that at one time drove the regional economy. This architectural and cultural heritage now needs our help, and the time is right for change. According to the Brookings Institution, despite the hardships that have plagued them, “the moment - demographic, economic, environmental, social - is ripe for revival” in our older, industrial cities. The Cleveland Restoration Society agrees.

Today, Tuesday, November 20, 2007, the Society held its 35th Annual Community Luncheon to share its vision of a vibrant Northeast Ohio and to start the process of envisioning the ways in which historic preservation can make this a reality. A panel of experts in real estate, tax credits, and architecture shared their best practices, experiences and recommendations for strengthening our commercial districts and neighborhoods emphasizing the use of historic preservation to create a sustainable region and a brighter future.

We’ve heard from the experts - now it’s your turn. How can we recreate the vibrant urban centers that once thrived in older industrial cities?

-- Erin Dorsey, Cleveland Restoration Society

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Lowe's Pays to Move 1885 House

Posted on: November 19th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mott HouseA house on Lowe's new headquarters in Mooresville, N.C., has been moved a mile away, where it will be renovated as an office.

Lowe's began construction on the site in 2003 and began working with Preservation North Carolina to find someone to claim the house, built in 1885 by local businessman Samuel Mott and empty since Lowe's bought the property four years ago.

Local interior designer Kay Kirby read a story about the 2,400-square-foot Mott House in the Charlotte Observer and contacted Preservation North Carolina.

"We worked with several people that were interested, and she was the best fit," says Mike Stout, director of the nonprofit's northwest office. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Press Coverage Raises Awareness of Threat to Tomb

Posted on: November 16th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Here at the National Trust, we are very pleased that the Army's plan to discard the Tomb Monument has received considerable recent attention from the media.

National Public Radio covered the threatened Tomb on November 11, interviewing Bob Loftur-Thun, a former Sentinel guard at the Tomb who strongly supports restoration rather than replacement.

The New York Times published an article and on-line video on the Tomb on November 12. The Times article was picked up as the cover story on AOL's webpage on November 12. More than 100,000 votes were cast in AOL's on-line poll, with 86 percent favoring repair of the original monument.

Earlier, the Army's replacement plan was covered by the Washington Post and the Washington Times.

-- Robert Nieweg

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.