Baltimore's Bromo Seltzer Tower Rehabbed for Artists

Posted on: February 14th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Bromo Seltzer

Baltimore's striking tribute to Florence, a clock tower known as the Bromo Seltzer Tower, officially opened as artists' studios six weeks ago after a six-year renovation.

The 15-story building was the tallest in Baltimore when it was built in 1911 and was even taller thanks to a 51-foot-tall, spinning Bromo-Seltzer bottle that came down 25 years later.

After a trip to Italy in 1900, architect Joseph Evans Sperry made a replica of the Palazzo Vecchio for the manufacturers of the hangover remedy. It was donated to the city 30 years ago and used as offices. In 2001, the newly formed Baltimore Office of Promotions and the Arts undertook the renovation.

"The building was in pretty serious disrepair," says Bill Gilmore, executive director of the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. "The city was obviously interested in saving the building and making it viable again, so we proposed artists' studio space."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

2008 Dates for NOLA Volunteer Opportunities

Posted on: February 14th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Once again, the National Trust for Historic Preservation is partnering with the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans to provide volunteer opportunities for those interested in helping with the city's ongoing recovery efforts.

For a fee of $200 per person, volunteers receive housing and food for the week. Daily transportation to and from the work site will be covered by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. For questions on this worthwhile program, email Sean Vissar at svissar [at] prcno [dot] org or by phone at (504) 636-3076.

Click the links below to register online.

February 25 to 29, 2008

April 28 to May 2, 2008

June 23 to 27, 2008

-- Daphne Gerig, manager of member engagement,
contributed to this story.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Actor Wendell Pierce (most recently of HBO’s “The Wire”) is leading an effort to gain National Register status for the Pontchartrain Park neighborhood and its golf course. This is one of the first post-World War II housing developments in the country built by and for African Americans. It was the home of New Orleans mayors Dutch Morial and his son Marc, along with jazz great Terrance Blanchard, and Pierce himself. Its golf course is named for its designer, Joe Bartholomew, who designed many local and national golf courses—but wasn’t able to play on them due to segregation.

We offered our help at any point educating residents about National Register vs. local historic district designation, state home owner tax credits, helping with the restoration of the landscaping, and any other preservation and neighborhood development issues. Pontchartrain Park was the post-World War II vision of the ranch house in the subdivision, which drew soldiers and their new brides out of older central cities.

Pierce wants to revitalize the neighborhood association and also protect the golf course and the existing housing stock from redevelopment that would alter the character of the neighborhood. The area suffered as much as six feet of flooding after Katrina.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Queens Church To Fall

Posted on: February 12th, 2008 by Preservation magazine 1 Comment

 

St. Saviour’s ChurchRolling hills and foliage don't exactly come to mind when one thinks of New York City, but green spaces do exist in the Big Apple. Case in point: St. Saviour's Church in Maspeth, Queens. Some call the two-acre area on which the church is located "a bit of country in the city." However, St. Saviour's is now under the threat of demolition by developers Maspeth Development LLC.Built in 1847 by architect Richard Upjohn, St. Saviour's Church is a wooden structure that some call "Carpenter Gothic." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Maryland Greenlights Hotel, Dooms 1906 Factory

Posted on: February 11th, 2008 by Preservation magazine

 

Footer Dye WorksDays are numbered for a 102-year-old factory in Cumberland, Md., that once supplied lace curtains to the White House.

This month, the state, which owns the Footer Dye Works, will sign a 50-year lease to a hotel developer with no plans to preserve the building, abandoned for a decade.

Locals have been concerned about the 45,000-square-foot brick building for several years, as a deal between the Canal Place Preservation and Development Authority and Pennsylvania-based Trestle Development lagged, due in part to the authority's lawsuits against the developer.

The authority's current plan calls for the demolition of the single-story annex to the building, about 60 percent of the building's total footprint, to create parking for a new hotel and two restaurants.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.