U.S. Green Building Council Puts LEED v3 Out For Public Comment

Posted on: May 19th, 2008 by Barbara Campagna

 

As promised, the U.S. Green Building Council put LEED v3 out for public comment today. Anyone is invited to review the draft and submit comments. You do not have to be a member of USGBC to submit comments. However, it does make sense to have some experience working with LEED. Here is the link to the USGBC website, which describes the changes, takes you directly to the draft and provides you with support documents. The public comment period is for 30 days from May 19th till June 22nd.

This is really, really exciting news. And we commend the USGBC for taking on this very complicated update to LEED. In less than a year, they have substantially restructured LEED by turning it into a weighted system based on life cycle analysis indicators AND providing an alternative compliance route for existing buildings which looks at the durability of assemblies and materials.

Our Sustainable Preservation Coalition will also be collecting comments to send in together.

Read my blog from March 24th, updated May 6th, to learn the impact of LEED v3 on preservation and social/cultural metrics. If you would like more information, don't understand how to submit comments or just want to chat about the implications to existing or historic buildings, feel free to post a comment to this blog or email me directly and I will be happy to help you. No, I haven't read through the draft yet. I'll be spending Memorial Day doing that, hopefully in my sunny courtyard after a nice long bike ride!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Notes from New Orleans: Lafitte Demolition Continues

Posted on: May 19th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Laftitte Demolition, May 17-18, 2008.

I walked around the Lafitte housing development this weekend and took these photos. The section between N. Rocheblave (the northern most boundary) and N. Galvez Street (the center traffic artery running through the site) is mostly piles of bricks, twisted metal (including the scrolled ironwork porch supports and metal windows) and personal effects. As I passed on foot, two men ran out of one of the standing buildings clutching some kind of materials that they threw into the trunk of car and then sped off. I imagine they were stripping the buildings of valuable building materials or helping themselves to the contents of the apartments, many of which are still furnished. So, about half of the development is demolished, but the potential 196 interim units in 18 buildings are still standing at the southern end of the site closest to the Claiborne overpass.

Laftitte Demolition, May 17-18, 2008.

As the work moves relentlessly on, Rick Denhart of Mercy Corps has been trying to work with the demolition contractor for Lafitte to determine the value the contractor assigned to various materials which the contractor intended to obtain as scrap (and hence lower the amount of his overall bid). This information has been slow in coming. The idea, as Rick explained it, would be to try to get intact items like windows and figure out a way to have the contractor accept payment of that value. Time is working against us here as the attempted negotiations stall.

Laftitte Demolition, May 17-18, 2008.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

LEED V.3 Goes Out for Public Comment on Monday, May 19th

Posted on: May 15th, 2008 by Barbara Campagna

 

GREAT NEWS for the Preservation and Sustainability Worlds! LEED v. 3 is coming out for Public Comment on Monday, May 19th. Bravo to USGBC and everyone who has worked so hard to help make LEED, the leading third party rating system in the US, reflect all the pieces of our culture. Below is the link to my blog posting of March 24th which describes this new version of LEED and the integration of preservation metrics into it. This is what we’ve all been waiting for folks. We will post LEED v. 3 on this blog and our website on Monday and encourage everyone to read it and review and send your comments into USGBC. Our Sustainable Preservation Coalition will also be collecting comments to send in together.

Read my blog from March 24th, updated May 6th, to learn the impact of LEED v. 3 on preservation and social/cultural metrics.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Historic Sites at a Crossroads

Posted on: May 15th, 2008 by Max van Balgooy

 

Forum Journal spring 2008The spring 2008 issue of Forum Journal is a special issue devoted to historic house museums, thanks to a generous grant from the 1772 Foundation. This special issue includes the findings and recommendations from the 2007 Forum on Historic Site Stewardship in the 21st Century at Kykuit (N.Y.) along with a half-dozen provocative essays on membership, heritage tourism, fund raising, stewardship, and attendance and financial trends by David Donath, John Durel, Marian A. Godfrey, Katherine Kane, Max A. van Balgooy, Jim Vaughan, Amy Webb, and David Young.

The essays are introduced by Jim Vaughan, Vice President of Historic Sites at NTHP, who not only provides a brief description of each essay but also lays out the findings and recommendations from the Kykuit symposium. You won't find complete consensus but you should be provoked by some of the ideas that were proposed (such as, calling them "historic house museums" limits our thinking, so let's use "historic sites"). Don't keep them to yourself—we invite you to share them here.

Forum members will receive their copies of this special thematic issue in the mail (look for the new full-color cover!). If you're not a member, you can find the introduction on PreservationNation.org and the entire issue is available for $8 through PreservationBooks.org or by calling the National Trust for Historic Preservation at (202) 588-6053. Better yet, join National Trust Forum and you'll receive this issue and much more!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Partners in Preservation

Posted on: May 14th, 2008 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

With the announcement yesterday morning of the five recipients of the Partners in Preservation grants in New Orleans, I joined Rev. Otto Duncan at St. James AME Church in Mid-City as the local Fox-TV affiliate covered the story. Partners in Preservation is an initiative of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and American Express. St. James AME Church, founded in 1848, is an established institution in the neighborhood with a congregation that is rebuilding in numbers as the church and the city rebuild. A $100,000 grant will complete repairs to the pressed tin ceiling and plaster walls of the sanctuary. Be sure to go to www.partnersinpreservation.com for information on all the sites.

St. James AME Church, New Orleans

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.