Discovery at 180-Year-Old Vermont Inn

Posted on: July 19th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

The inn remains open during the $1.5 million update. (Middlebury Inn)You never know what you'll find when you renovate a historic hotel.

Last month, during a $1.5 million renovation of the Middlebury Inn in Middlebury, Vt., workers uncovered one of the original entrances to the hotel, built in 1827.

"When they were dismantling the wall, lo and behold, we started to see a finished brick opening," says Jeff Costello, general manager, who watched the June 19 discovery. "It was really intriguing. When we saw that, we changed the whole scope of the project."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Minimize Energy Use in Historic Buildings

Posted on: July 19th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

  1. Change All Your Light Bulbs to CFLs
    Replacing just one regular incandescent light bulb with a compact fluorescent light bulb will save 150 pounds of carbon dioxide a year. Imagine how much carbon dioxide changing ALL your light bulbs will save. CFLs are significantly more expensive than incandescent up front, but they can last up to 10x longer. Lowe's has one of the best in-store collections of cfls but you can also buy them online at websites such as http://www.energyfederation.org/consumer/default.php/cPath/25_44.
  2. Use Less Hot Water
    It takes a lot of energy (coal, electricity, etc) to heat water. Install low flow showerheads, and do your wash in cold or warm water instead of hot water. Think twice the next time you go to turn on the hot water.
  3. Adjust Thermostats
    In any building or space where you do not have carefully monitored temperatures for collections (etc), move the thermostat down just 2 degrees in the winter and up 2 degrees in the summer. You can save about 2,000 pounds of carbon dioxide a year per building with this simple adjustment.
    ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Pasadena City Hall Reopens After Retrofit

Posted on: July 18th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

1927 Pasadena City Hall (Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc.)After an $80 million seismic retrofit and restoration, the 80-year-old city hall in Pasadena, Calif., looks just like it did when it was completed in 1927.

On July 15, the city celebrated the grand reopening of the National Register-listed building, which was closed for three years.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Chicago Next City for Preservation Contest

Posted on: July 17th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Chicago’s 1927 Beaux-Arts Buckingham Fountain (Chicago Convention and Visitors Bureau)The "American Idol" of historic preservation is coming to Chicago.

Some of the city's historic buildings in need will receive $1 million through Partners in Preservation, a program that American Express, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the World Monuments Fund launched last year.

Last November, the National Trust announced that 13 historic sites in San Francisco would split $1 million after residents voted for their favorites. Of the 25 options, Bay Area voters overwhelmingly supported Bernard Maybeck's First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Berkeley, Calif.

Chicago residents are welcome to cast their votes this fall.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Conserve Resources in Historic Buildings

Posted on: July 16th, 2007 by Barbara Campagna

 

  1. Seal the Cracks, Block the Openings
    Every degree of difference in the temperature between the inside and outside of a building can add as much as 10% to your heating and cooling bills. You can cut greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1,000 pounds per year per building by making sure that gaps at windows and doors are properly caulked, fit dampers to fireplaces, block unnecessary vents, and weatherstrip all seams.
  2. Buy Laptops, Not Desktops
    As your computers need to be updated, buy laptops instead of desktops which can save up to 90% energy per unit! And make sure you recycle your old computers.
  3. Buy FSC Certified Timber
    Wood is a perfect renewable and sustainable resource, provided it isn’t being clearcut or harvested in an unsustainable fashion. To ensure the wood you are buying has come from a forest managed according to internationally agreed-upon ethical, social and environmental standards, look for the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified timber label.
    ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Houston Developer To Demolish Historic Buildings

Posted on: July 16th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

The Beatty-West Building, shown here in 1920, was designed by architect Henry C. Cooke. (Houston Metropolitan Research Center, Houston Public Library)One of Houston's last historic blocks will be leveled for a 47-story office tower.

Local developer Hines, which erected another skyscraper in 2003, plans to start construction on the 900-square-foot building in March.

Three historic buildings will disappear early next year: the 1912 Beatty-West Building, the 1940 former Bond Clothes store, and the 1913 Montegu Hotel. The developer will save one historic building on the block, the Stowers Building, a recently restored structure built in 1913.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.