PreservationNation Blog Maintenance

Posted on: July 29th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Today, July 29, the PreservationNation blog is getting a much-needed software upgrade. We expect that, once it is complete, everything will function as it should. However, there are often unexpected surprises with software updates, so please bear with us if things are slightly wonky for a day or two. And, in the event that you stop receiving updates via RSS, please visit the site to re-subscribe.

Many thanks for your patience and understanding -- we really appreciate it!

Update: The upgrade went (mostly) without a hitch. The only thing we seem to have lost is our categories, which means navigation is a bit scarce at the moment and we've had to temporarily eliminate the topic-specific RSS feeds. We're working on getting these back as quickly as possible. Thanks again for your patience.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Notes from New Orleans: Oil Spill Cleanup

Posted on: July 29th, 2008 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

Oil spill cleanup in New Orleans.Clean up of this past Wednesday’s 400,000-gallon oil spill in the Mississippi River continued as limited river traffic resumed based on shipping priorities. The Port of New Orleans estimated revenue losses of as much as $101 million per day. A 100-mile stretch of the Mississippi River was closed as environmental contractors scrambled to corral and collect the oil with containment booms, skimmer boats and “pom-poms” tied to lines to soak up the mess.

The dock of the Algiers ferry along the French Quarter riverfront became one of the staging sites for boats, personnel, and equipment.

Oil spill cleanup in New Orleans.Early Wednesday, the Tintomara, a Liberian-flagged tanker collided with a barge carrying fuel oil that was being towed by the Mel Oliver, a tug boat. The Coast Guard determined that the tugboat operator had only an apprentice license, and no one else on the tug had the appropriate license either.

The operators of New Orleans popular Natchez steamboat had been looking forward to a busy week of customers. The 2,000-passenger Carnival Fantasy cruise ship had planned to dock in New Orleans on Saturday, but was diverted to Mobile, Alabama.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

President Lincoln's Cottage Blog Turned 100 This Week: 100 posts, that is. To mark their centennial, the folks at the blog are listing off One Hundred Things to Know About President Lincoln's Cottage. [President Lincoln's Cottage Blog]

Ballpark Development: Planetizen takes a different look at the effects of stadium development upon neighborhoods and employment. [Planetizen]

Saving Wood Windows Means Saving Money and Energy: The Landmark Society of Western NY discusses the advantages of saving your old-growth wood windows. [Confessions of a Preservationist]

Montpelier Restoration Update: With their Grand Opening just around the corner, Montpelier's restoration team has been hard at work in and around James Madison's estate.[Montpelier Restoration Updates]

Turning Preservation into Art: Warehouses that store materials saved from historic properties can preserve key elements of architectural history. Two artists put their talent to use on items recovered from Spartanburg's Architectural Salvage store. [Preservation Trust of Spartanburg, Inc.]

Guthriesville General Store is Saved--For Now: The 140 year old building that once housed a Chester County, Pa. general store has been given 75 days to find a buyer before convenience store chain WaWa will take over and begin demolition. [Preservation Magazine]

New Historic Site Directors Appointed: Woodlawn Plantation and Pope-Leighey House--both located in Virginia--along with Chesterwood in Stockbridge, Ma. have appointed new directors. All three are National Trust Historic Sites. [National Trust Historic Sites] [National Trust Historic Sites]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Kansas Court Finds Religious Exercise Would Not Be Substantially Burdened in State Preservation Law Case

Posted on: July 25th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Bethany Place - Photo Credit: Kansas Preservation Alliance, Inc.

On July 21, 2008 the Shawnee County District Court set aside the Topeka City Council’s decision under the Kansas Historic Preservation Act, that there were no feasible and prudent alternatives to the construction of a new parking lot for Grace Cathedral, to be located in the environs of Bethany Place, the site of Bethany College, the first women's college in Kansas. The City had approved the project despite a finding by the Kansas Historic Preservation Officer, that the proposed project would “encroach upon, damage or destroy the Bethany Place site” because it would necessitate the removal of several historic trees and change the relationship between two historic buildings on the site and the street.

In a detailed, 57-page decision, the court sharply criticized the city for ignoring evidence that feasible and prudent alternatives to the proposed parking lot existed and for granting the permit upon the threat of litigation under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA). Significantly, the court stated a decision to deny the Cathedral’s parking lot project would not rise to the level of a “direct and substantial burden” on religious exercise.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

J. Jackson Walter, 1940-2008

Posted on: July 24th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Jack Walter, former president of the National Trust for Historic PreservationAs noted on Monday, former National Trust for Historic Preservation President J. Jackson Walter died unexpectedly on July 18, 2008. Today's Washington Post features an article about his career, including his time leading our organization:

In 1984, Mr. Walter was appointed president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, established in 1949 as a congressionally chartered protector of historic properties.

He said he wanted the organization "to be a major central figure in public debates about what our cities should look like, where tall building should go, and try to put historic preservation right in the middle of those debates instead of at the end."

Read the entire article online here.

Jack is already missed by his friends and colleagues here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.