Good News, Historic Homeowners…

Posted on: March 4th, 2008 by Patrice Frey 1 Comment

 

"The greenest home...may be the one you live in now, given the cost in dollars and pollution of ripping out old materials and producing and shipping new ones." 

Check out a good piece in the Wall Street Journal from Friday.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120424591916201491.html?mod=djemPJ

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lost: Iowa School

Posted on: February 28th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

East Side School, Decorah, IowaThe loss of a majestic 112-year-old school last month has divided a northeastern Iowa town.

"A lot of people are still feeling really hurt here in town," says Jack Hedstrom, chair of the East Side School Development Committee, which fought for years to save the East Side School in Decorah, Iowa. "I wait for the day when people start understanding what they did. I'm sure that day will come."

In a September referendum, 4,000 residents in the town of 8,100 voted on the issue, and 57 percent chose not to lease the Romanesque revival building to Hedstrom's group, which had raised millions for its restoration.

In 2003, the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed the schools as one of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Public Housing Demolitions Begin

Posted on: February 27th, 2008 by Walter Gallas 3 Comments

 

The St. Bernard housing development.

The demolitions have begun in earnest at three of the four public housing developments—at a pace that seems designed to get these buildings out of sight and out of mind as quickly as possible. I visited a week ago and the buildings were being prepared to come down. The last belongings of residents along with major appliances and water heaters were strewn in the courtyards. Roofing shingles were removed down and the wooden decking is exposed. Windows were being punched out with an extended fork-lift like device. At C.J. Peete, a number of buildings are already gone and the work is moving along throughout the site at a brisk pace. At B. W. Cooper, work is concentrated on the 1950s era buildings. None of the historic buildings have been touched.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

President Bush Announces Poster Program for Schools

Posted on: February 26th, 2008 by Preservation magazine

 

Bush at Picturing America event, 2/27/08For students across the country, American history will soon get a whole lot easier to envision. That's because the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) has launched its new "Picturing America" program, which will provide large, high-quality reproductions of 40 different works of art by American artists—including paintings, photographs, and architecture—to any school or library across the country that applies.

President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, who is a former teacher, and NEH Chairman Bruce Cole announced the campaign at the White House today. "At their best, arts and humanities express the ideals that define our nation," said President Bush. "We are defined not by bloodline, race, or creed, but by character and convictions."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Group Asks Billionaire To Spare 1920s Inn

Posted on: February 25th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Coast Inn, Laguna BeachSupporters of the oldest gay bar in the country—the oceanfront "Boom Boom Room," which opened in Laguna Beach, Calif., in the 1940s—have hope this month that the building's new owner might want to offload the controversial property rather than razing it for a new hotel.

Steven Udvar-Hazy, who bought the building in 2005 for $12.9 million, took it off the market on Feb. 1. But the "for sale" signs are still posted, and two potential sellers viewed it last week, according to Fred Karger, who is leading a grassroots effort to save the club.

"Some people are discouraged, but a lot of people have new hope that good will will prevail, that he will come around and do the right thing," says Karger, who last month launched "Operation Postcard," a asking Hazy to lower his price of $20 million or donate the building to the city. "I'm not suggesting he'd take a loss, but I'm hoping he'll be more reasonable in light of the history of this bar."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.