Upcoming Event: Whose Carbon is it Anyway?

Posted on: March 13th, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

The National Building Museum is offering what promises to be a good discussion about how to tackle the thorniest of carbon problems -- all that carbon that is released into the atmosphere by constructing and using buildings. See the announcement below. Hope some preservation-minded folks will be able to make the event -- and speak up about the importance of reusing our existing buildings. (Unfortunately, I'll be on a plane to Seattle, driving up my own carbon footprint.) See the NBM website for details.

Tuesday, March 18
Whose Carbon is it Anyway?
6:30 - 8:00 p.m.
As the creation and maintenance of buildings creates over 40% of the carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere every year, who is going to take the lead in finding solutions? Opening Remarks: Harriet Tregoning, Director, DC Office of Planning. A discussion with: Scott Barrett, Director, International Policy Program; Professor of Environmental Economics and International Political Economy, SAIS at Johns Hopkins University • Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post Journalist (moderator) • Rainer Hascher, Co-founder, Hascher Jehle Architektur, Germany • Melissa Lavinson, Director, Federal Environmental Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, PG&E Corporation •Fran Pavley, Former Assemblywoman, State of California 1.5 LU (AIA) 1.5 CFE (ASLA) 1.5 CM (AICP)

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

California May Close 48 State Parks

Posted on: March 7th, 2008 by Preservation magazine 14 Comments

 

Monte de Oro State Park, Steve SierenFrom the Redwoods to the beaches, parts of California soon may be inaccessible to visitors.

Under the cloud of the Golden State's current fiscal crisis, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger recently asked each department and agency in the state to reduce its budget by up to 10 percent. The Department of Parks and Recreation came up with a proposal that sent a shock wave through the state: Close 48 state parks and reduce lifeguards at some beaches to cut $8.8 million from the 2008-2009 state budget.

Grassroots campaigns in dozens of shocked communities, including the town of Benicia near San Francisco, are calling for alternatives to closing prized resources like Benicia State Recreation Area and Benicia Capitol Historic Park. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: A Visit to Lafitte

Posted on: March 7th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

I walked around the this past Sunday morning. The 196 units in 18 buildings at the end closest to I-10/Claiborne appear to be under basic renovation. The metal screens are being removed from the doors and windows and even on Sunday I saw men working inside some of the units. These are the units which the City Council and the Mayor called for opening as interim units.

Lafitte housing development, March 2008.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lincoln's Hometown May Lose Lincoln-Era House

Posted on: March 4th, 2008 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

Maisenbacher HouseA hospital in Abraham Lincoln's hometown of Springfield, Ill., plans to expand, and preservationists want to make sure those plans don't include the loss of a Lincoln-era house.

Built in the 1850s, the brick Italianate structure known as the Maisenbacher House was empty when the Springfield Clinic purchased it for $190,000 last September, planning to tear it down for a parking lot.

"All the trees have been cut down around it. It's been boarded up, some shutters have been removed, so it's looking pretty beleaguered," says Dick Hart, a member of a local preservation foundation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Good News, Historic Homeowners…

Posted on: March 4th, 2008 by Patrice Frey 1 Comment

 

"The greenest home...may be the one you live in now, given the cost in dollars and pollution of ripping out old materials and producing and shipping new ones." 

Check out a good piece in the Wall Street Journal from Friday.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120424591916201491.html?mod=djemPJ

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.