New York City Nightclub Protected

Posted on: March 25th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Webster Hall, NYCA New York City nightclub has made it past the velvet ropes to city landmark status.

On Mar. 19, the New York City Landmarks Commission bestowed that designation to Webster Hall, built in 1886. The move may prevent the building from being torn down for 20- and 30-story dormitories and hotels, like several others on the same block.

"In the area where Webster Hall is, we've been losing a lot of historic buildings," says Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, which pushed for the designation. "On the same block, we lost a 19th-century church, St. Ann's, for a 26-story dorm. We did not want to see the same thing happen to Webster Hall."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

Trinity Church & Copley Square, Boston, MASustainable Preservation Coalition

The National Trust for Historic Preservation created the Sustainable Preservation Coalition two years ago in order to impact further development of the LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) Building Rating Systems. We partnered with several national organizations who were developing separate sustainability agendas including the AIA, APT International, the National Park Service, General Services Administration and the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers. We realized we could make a bigger impact integrating historic preservation and green building values by working together.

Our first goal was to meet with the U.S. Green Building Council, the developer of LEED, and open up a dialogue to discuss improvements to their products which would better reflect the importance of existing buildings to sustainable stewardship of our planet and its limited resources. While LEED does much to encourage more sustainable development, and historic buildings can achieve the highest LEED rating, we believed it could certainly do better because the current version of LEED (LEED 2.2):

1. Overlooks the impact of projects on cultural value;

2. Does not effectively consider the performance, longer service lives and embodied energy of historic materials and assemblies;

3. And is overly focused on current or future technologies, neglecting how past experience helps to determine sustainable performance.

Our meeting with the President of USGBC (Rick Fedrizzi) and the Director of LEED Technical Development (Brendan Owens) was quite successful, ending with Rick inviting us to help them prepare preservation metrics for the revised versions of LEED. Over the past year, our coalition has been meeting with USGBC and are delighted to announce that soon LEED 3.0 will be unveiled.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Barbara Campagna

Barbara A. Campagna, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C was formerly the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust in the Stewardship of Historic Sites office. She is currently a sustainability consultant to the National Trust and can be reached at bcampagna@bcampagna.com.

Windows, Part II

Posted on: March 24th, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

An alert reader (Roberta Lane, Program Officer and Regional Attorney with the Trust's Northeast Field Office), reminded me that there is another great window study out there -- "Measured Winter Performance of Storm Windows," by Joseph Klems. I failed to mention that in a posting last Friday about windows.

Klems -- a researcher with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -- completed the study in 2002. In short, the study finds that low-e storm windows perform "very similarly" to replacement windows. Happy reading.

 

 

 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Attention all Rhode Islanders…

Posted on: March 24th, 2008 by Patrice Frey

 

Another conference/workshop announcement -- this time for those of you in the Rhode Island area. The Providence Preservation Society presents "Balancing Sustainability & Preservation: Protecting Environmental & Historic Resources" on April 2nd. Visit http://www.ppsri.org/?section=events for the details. 

If you attend -- please visit my little corner of the PreservationNation blog again and share the highlights. We'd love to hear about it.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Affordable Housing Shortage

Posted on: March 24th, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Mercy Corps’ Rick Denhart was told by the demolition contractor of the C.J. Peete housing development that 15 buildings in one quadrant of the site could be available for salvage, yet total demolition of the buildings seems to be proceeding. Meanwhile, one source told us the demolition of Lafitte was likely indefinitely stalled, yet a city source said the Lafitte demolition would occur.

The March 23 Sunday Times-Picayune ran a story on the precarious state of many affordable housing projects in New Orleans given the turmoil in the financial markets. An accompanying map indicated that phases of C. J. Peete and B. W. Cooper have closed on their financing, while Lafitte and St. Bernard have not. The map also shows that one phase of C.J.Peete is completed—which is not true. Developers are also caught in a bind with rising construction costs yet constraints on how much rent to charge on some units.

The Times-Picayune also acknowledged the shortage of affordable housing this week in a story about the thousands who lined up in Kenner to apply for Section 8 vouchers from the Kenner Housing Authority. “Many people in line said the post-Katrina shortage of affordable housing prompted them to ask for government help,” the story reports.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.