Howard Allen, a New Orleans native, fled the city in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and finally was able to come home in April. Now -- less than a year after he returned -- he's faced with being displaced once again, as his house is scheduled to be demolished to make way for new VA and LSU hospitals. He's shocked at the notion of having to leave again again, from a neighborhood where people are actively rebuilding.  "We've been going through this too long -- I don't think it's right," he says.

And we agree. Learn more about our fight to save Mid-City. Or, take action now!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Homeowner and New Orleans native Gayle Ruth was one of the first people to return to her historic home in the Lower Mid-City neighborhood after Hurricane Katrina. In the video below, she talks about the excitement that grew over time as people came back and renovated their homes -- and how all of their work may now be "for naught" as the area is the desired locale for a new hospital complex.

Learn more about our fight to save Mid-City. Or, take action now!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Take action today to protect the "world's longest art gallery" from the December 19 oil and gay lease sale.

Take action today to protect the "world's longest art gallery" from the December 19 oil and gas lease sale.

A lot can happen in a day, and we have exactly eleven of them left to make our case in Nine Mile Canyon.

On December 19, the Utah State Office of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will hold an oil and gas lease sale for hundreds of thousands of acres of land in Utah, including areas in and near Nine Mile Canyon as well as areas just outside of Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park and Dinosaur National Monument. If issued as proposed, the lease sale would elevate the already high levels of industrial traffic in the canyon, which creates clouds of dust and corrosive chemicals that then settle on and damage fragile and ancient rock art panels.

While some recent developments have been positive - including the December 2 announcement of eight lease deferrals around Nine Mile Canyon - we aren't there yet, as sixteen art-rich parcels remain in the scope of the proposed sale.

There's still time to make a difference, but we need your voice.

Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation issued a national action alert to drum up support for additional deferrals. Join us in urging Congress to persuade the Bureau of Land Management to protect irreplaceable panels of rock art by removing the remaining gas and oil leases in and around Nine Mile Canyon. Using our online letter form, you can get involved in a matter of minutes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 

There is no argument more compelling for saving New Orleans' Mid-City neighborhood than the words of the residents themselves. Many are life-long New Orleanians who came back after Hurricane Katrina to rebuild their homes. In this video, Wallace Thurman, a veteran, talks about losing the place where he was born -- and still lives today.

Help us save Mr. Thurman's home -- and those of the other residents of lower Mid-City. Take action today!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Change You Can Upload

Posted on: December 8th, 2008 by Jason Clement

 

Use our policy platform for the incoming administration to make a case for preservation on President-Elect Barack Obama's new Web site, www.change.gov.

Use our policy platform for the incoming administration to make a case for preservation on www.change.gov.

"What began twenty-one months ago in the depths of winter must not end on this autumn night. This victory alone is not the change we seek - it is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were. It cannot happen without you."

That was the booming call to action delivered by President-Elect Barack Obama in his election night acceptance speech - an event that was attended by thousands and experienced by many, many more through Twitter alerts, Facebook updates, a live Web feed and podcast, a Flickr slideshow, and a follow-up YouTube video that has been streamed 3,942,523 times and counting.

Really, if this election taught us anything, it's that having a strong web presence has become an indispensible component of American politicking - right along side of appearances on Sunday morning talk shows, photos ops in local bowling alleys and diners, and rallies where John Mellencamp is turned up just a little bit too loud. So, as politicians and the strategists who love them continue to tinker with widgets and feeds, how can we best use these new avenues to advance our mission to protect and preserve? To quote President-Elect Barack Obama, how is the Internet our "chance to make...change?"

The National Trust for Historic Preservation has developed a policy platform for the incoming administration that outlines how preservation - when integrated into economic, energy and climate change policies - can not only protect the places that matter most, but also lead to more livable, sustainable and economically viable communities. As our public policy department works hard to get this document front and center with members of the transition team, we invite you to explore the online version and then take our message to www.change.gov, where President-Elect Barack Obama is soliciting stories and policy ideas from the many millions of people he engaged throughout the election.

Now is the time for our voice and our ideas to be heard, and one of the keys to our success can be summed up by tweaking an infamous election-season sound byte: It's the Internet, stupid.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.