Historic Sites at a Crossroads

Posted on: May 15th, 2008 by Max van Balgooy

 

Forum Journal spring 2008The spring 2008 issue of Forum Journal is a special issue devoted to historic house museums, thanks to a generous grant from the 1772 Foundation. This special issue includes the findings and recommendations from the 2007 Forum on Historic Site Stewardship in the 21st Century at Kykuit (N.Y.) along with a half-dozen provocative essays on membership, heritage tourism, fund raising, stewardship, and attendance and financial trends by David Donath, John Durel, Marian A. Godfrey, Katherine Kane, Max A. van Balgooy, Jim Vaughan, Amy Webb, and David Young.

The essays are introduced by Jim Vaughan, Vice President of Historic Sites at NTHP, who not only provides a brief description of each essay but also lays out the findings and recommendations from the Kykuit symposium. You won't find complete consensus but you should be provoked by some of the ideas that were proposed (such as, calling them "historic house museums" limits our thinking, so let's use "historic sites"). Don't keep them to yourself—we invite you to share them here.

Forum members will receive their copies of this special thematic issue in the mail (look for the new full-color cover!). If you're not a member, you can find the introduction on PreservationNation.org and the entire issue is available for $8 through PreservationBooks.org or by calling the National Trust for Historic Preservation at (202) 588-6053. Better yet, join National Trust Forum and you'll receive this issue and much more!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Notes from New Orleans: Partners in Preservation

Posted on: May 14th, 2008 by Walter Gallas 1 Comment

 

With the announcement yesterday morning of the five recipients of the Partners in Preservation grants in New Orleans, I joined Rev. Otto Duncan at St. James AME Church in Mid-City as the local Fox-TV affiliate covered the story. Partners in Preservation is an initiative of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and American Express. St. James AME Church, founded in 1848, is an established institution in the neighborhood with a congregation that is rebuilding in numbers as the church and the city rebuild. A $100,000 grant will complete repairs to the pressed tin ceiling and plaster walls of the sanctuary. Be sure to go to www.partnersinpreservation.com for information on all the sites.

St. James AME Church, New Orleans

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

This Place Matters

Posted on: May 13th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

May is National Preservation Month, and to celebrate, we're kicking off a new campaign called "This Place Matters." We're asking you to tell us about places that matter -- large and small, nationally significant and personally priceless. We're collecting photos and stories on our website and videos on our YouTube channel.

We've already heard about some great places that matter, including:

Learn more -- and submit your favorite place on our website.

And if pictures just aren't enough, consider sharing a video about your favorite place, like the two below:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

 

The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation is offering a half-day session on increasing the energy efficiency of historic homes while maintaining historic integrity. Learn more about the May 17th program.

From CT website: Searching for ways to save money on energy costs AND maintain the integrity of your historic house?

Then you will not want to miss this program! Hoffner Residential Conservation Services will perform an energy audit for the circa 1827 Eli Whitney Boarding House for Working Men which will include a demonstration of blower door and infrared testing. Jay Bright, AIA, Architect, certified by the State Historic Commission, will discuss ways to increase the energy efficiency of the building while maintaining its historic integrity.


The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Richard Moe Interviewed on "The Q & A Cafe with Carol Joynt"

Posted on: May 9th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Yesterday, National Trust for Historic Preservation President Richard Moe was interviewed for Washington, DC's The Q&A Cafe with Carol Joynt. The 45-minute conversation covered a variety of topics -- from the changing role of the vice president (Moe was chief of staff to Vice President Walter Mondale), to the newest National Trust Historic Site, President Lincoln's Cottage, to the importance of Main Street communities. He discussed endangered sites in DC -- most notably St. Elizabeth's Hospital and the Smithsonian Arts & Industries building, both of which have been listed on the 11 Most Endangered list in recent years. Moe also fielded questions on the relationship between historic preservation and sustainability, the ongoing restoration efforts along the Gulf Coast, and the National Trust's first international project, Finca Vigia in Cuba.

If you happen to be in the DC area, the program will be repeated several times over the weekend:

  • Friday at 8:00 p.m. on Washington, DC Cable/TV-16,
  • Saturday at 6:00 p.m. on Washington, DC's NewsChannel 8, and
  • Sunday at 11:00 p.m. also on NewsChannel 8.

For those of you outside the capital city, there's YouTube:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.