New Jersey Historic Sites at Risk: It's a situation becoming all too common around the country. PreserveNJ discusses the risk that historic sites the Garden State are facing due to the current economic crisis. "We’re going to have to explore innovative ways of funding and managing these important historic places as the NJ state budget shrinks even more." [PreservNJ]

Time Tells on Tulsa: Some very cool photos and reflections from Vince Michael on his experiences at the National Preservation Conference. [Time Tells]

Linked Voids: BLDGBLOG ponders the "so-called birthmark of the World Trade Center," giant, cast-iron rings that were the last traces of the old Hudson and Manhattan RR which crossed underneath the World Trade Center site. "What was once a tunnel – an underground space of air – has been strangely inverted, transformed into an object, freed from its terrestrial context." [BLDGBLOG]

Dubai's Anara Tower Hopes to Gain LEED Silver: In what would surely be the most lavishly designed building to achieve such certification, the iconic Dubai Anara Tower--which has yet to begin construction-- is looking to get LEED Silver status. [Jetson Green]

Revitalization of Crotona Park East: The Bronx neighborhood which President Carter once called America's "worst slum," has come a long way since the 1970's. While some old problems still linger, Crotona Park East has been recently described as having a "suburb in the city" feel to it. [New York Times - Real Estate]

Ebola Island?: The National Trust has a lot of interest in Gulf Coast Recovery and the areas that have been affected by the devastating hurricanes over the past few years. This article may not have anything to do with preservation, but the idea of a national biological defense lab situated so closely to areas that have been ravished by recent storms is alarming. The building is supposedly built to withstand the most devastating of conditions, "says the lab's deputy director, 'The entire island can wash away and this is still going to be here.'" [Pruned]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

"World's Longest Art Gallery" Again Under Imminent Threat

Posted on: October 31st, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Truck traffic threatens prehistoric rock art in Nine Mile Canyon.

Earlier today, The Washington Post and The Salt Lake Tribune published stories outlining the Bureau of Land Management's December plans to sell oil and gas leases in areas of Utah known to contain some of the nation's most significant cultural and natural resources, including the Nine Mile Canyon region. Unfortunately, this decision represents the latest in a series of moves by BLM to expedite oil and gas leasing and development near Nine Mile Canyon, an area with the highest concentration of rock art sites in the United States that is often referred to as the "world's longest art gallery." In recent years, truck traffic associated with BLM-approved natural gas projects near the Canyon has caused harmful levels of dust and chemicals to settle on the rock art sites. Thus far, BLM has refused to study in detail alternative access routes that would avoid the need for natural gas trucks to use Nine Mile Canyon, even though a September 2008 study funded by the National Trust for Historic Preservation shows that these alternative routes are feasible.

Additionally, we have also learned that BLM plans to issue the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the West Tavaputs Natural Gas Full Field Development Plan early next week (West Tavaputs Plateau is the area within Nine Mile Canyon where most natural gas extraction is now occurring). If the BLM's final EIS approves the energy companies' proposals, truck traffic in Nine Mile Canyon could increase by an additional 500 percent.

Once you have digested Tuesday's election results, check back in with PreservationNation for more information on the lease sale and Final EIS and learn about how you can let BLM know of your concerns for Nine Mile Canyon. In the meantime, here's a video shot back in April, showing the damage done to the canyon's prehistoric rock art by truck traffic.

-- Ti Hays & Virgil Mc Dill

Ti Hays is the Public Lands Counsel and Virgil McDill is the communications manager at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Video: Ambitious Initiatives, Visionary Leaders Protect Treasures

Posted on: October 30th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

The first in a series of videos highlighting the winners of the 2008 National Preservation Awards.

On October 23, Mark Michel and Jane Blaffer Owen received the prestigious Louise DuPont Crowninshield Award -- the national preservation movement's highest accolade -- from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Both have expertly combined vision, action and leadership to launch highly ambitious initiatives that protect some of the nation's most precious -- and fragile -- historic treasures.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Preservation Destinations

Posted on: October 29th, 2008 by Matt Ringelstetter

 

With the National Preservation Conference in Tulsa all wrapped up, it's time to look forward to upcoming conferences and the cities that will be hosting them. While walking around the conference exhibit hall last week, I had the opportunity to speak with representatives from Nashville--host of next year's conference--and Buffalo, which will host in 2011. In addition, I got to ask Spokane, Phoenix and Detroit what their respective cities have to offer to those who care about historic preservation. Each of these cities is contending to play host in 2012 or 2013--which seem like far off dates, but the planning and work that goes in to making this conference such a huge success takes an enormous amount of time and preparation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Another Chicago Partners in Preservation Project is Complete – Bohemian National Cemetery Water Tower

Posted on: October 28th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Work on the restoration began by replacing the deteriorated decking surrounding the tank, providing the work crew with a stable platform for the roofing replacement and tank repairs.

Work on the restoration began by replacing the deteriorated decking surrounding the tank, providing the work crew with a stable platform for the roofing replacement and tank repairs.

The Bohemian National Cemetery on Chicago’s north side is the final resting place of over 114,000 people, many of Bohemian, Czech and Slavic descent. In addition to an amazing collection of buildings and funerary statuary, the grounds also boast a historic wooden water tank, which was constructed on the grounds in 1898 to draw water from the North Branch of the Chicago River for irrigation of the 122 acres of landscaped property in the Cemetery. Severe deterioration of the roofing and wooden staves of the tank had comprised its ability to draw and hold water, and the damaged platform surrounding the tank made it difficult and dangerous to access it for repairs.

The restoration was finished earlier this month when the historic signage on the exterior of the tank was repainted in its original colors. (Photo: Bohemian National Cemetery Association)

The restoration was finished earlier this month when the historic signage on the exterior of the tank was repainted in its original colors. (Photo: Bohemian National Cemetery Association)

Earlier this summer Carlson Tank Sales & Service Company -- one of the few surviving companies that still repairs Chicago's hundreds of historic wooden water tanks -- reconstructed the platform to provide safe and secure access. The roofing was replaced and the staves of the wooden tank were repaired.

The final step of repainting the historic signage on the exterior was completed earlier this month, restoring the Bohemian National Cemetery Water Tank to its position of prominence as a neighborhood landmark.

– Christina Morris

Christina Morris is a program officer in the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Midwest Office.

Learn more about the Partners in Preservation program here.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.