Faces in Preservation: Meet Mayor Roy D. Buol

Posted on: December 12th, 2008 by Jason Clement 1 Comment

 

Meet Mayor Buol of Dubuque, Iowa in our new Faces in Preservation series.

Meet Mayor Buol of Dubuque, Iowa, in our new Faces in Preservation series.

In politics, there's nothing more powerful than a personal story.

Think about it: From the start of the Iowa primaries until the final polls closed in Alaska, we heard a steady stream of stories about the concerned line worker in Michigan, the parents who couldn't afford college payments in California, and the single mom who waits tables as a second job in North Carolina. And really, who can forget the now infamous plumber who became an overnight political sensation?

These stories work because they give us something to sink our teeth - and our hearts - into, which is why the National Trust for Historic Preservation has launched a new series called Faces in Preservation. As a supplement to our official policy platform, this evolving collection of stories will introduce you and the incoming Obama Administration to the preservationists who are on the front lines of change in our communities and demonstrating that preservation is so much more than just standing in front of wrecking balls.

This week, we start with pioneers in sustainability who are proving that going green puts communities in the black. In anticipation of his Faces in Preservation profile, we had a chance to chat with Mayor Roy D. Buol of Dubuque, Iowa, about a project that is turning 17 downtown blocks of abandoned or misused industrial warehouses into a livable, walkable neighborhood that is green friendly and mixed use.

PreservationNation: What does sustainability mean to you?

We must remember the Native American proverb that says "We do not inherit the earth, we borrow it from our grandchildren." When I think about sustainability, I see the faces of my grandchildren. I see them in school, at the park, near the river, making crafts at the art museum or going to a festival in downtown. I see how connected they are to our community and the lessons that they are already learning about being stewards of this great city. Even at their young age, they are interacting and respecting the native species that make our bluffs so majestic, our prairies so open, and our creeks and rivers full of life. They are meeting new families that come to Dubuque and celebrating the richness that these families bring with traditions and cultures for us to enjoy. And they benefit from quality, local businesses that provide a means to raise healthy, productive families. Sustainability must be about creating stewardship in our children and grandchildren - a stewardship that emphasizes environmental integrity, social/cultural vibrancy and economic prosperity.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 

Sam Jupiter, Jr. is 91 and has been cutting hair in Mid-City New Orleans for the past 20 years. Because of the VA and LSU's decision to tear down his neighborhood for a hospital complex, he's now in danger of losing the business he  purchased in 1988. When asked if he was going to fight to retain his livelihood he said, "I'm going to join with the people. We need help... We need plenty of help. I just hope we get that help."

Take a moment now to be the help that Mr. Jupiter is seeking. We're asking everyone concerned about these unnecessary demolitions to write to three  top decision-makers. Take action now!

Learn more about our fight to save Mid-City.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Howard Allen, a New Orleans native, fled the city in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and finally was able to come home in April. Now -- less than a year after he returned -- he's faced with being displaced once again, as his house is scheduled to be demolished to make way for new VA and LSU hospitals. He's shocked at the notion of having to leave again again, from a neighborhood where people are actively rebuilding.  "We've been going through this too long -- I don't think it's right," he says.

And we agree. Learn more about our fight to save Mid-City. Or, take action now!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Homeowner and New Orleans native Gayle Ruth was one of the first people to return to her historic home in the Lower Mid-City neighborhood after Hurricane Katrina. In the video below, she talks about the excitement that grew over time as people came back and renovated their homes -- and how all of their work may now be "for naught" as the area is the desired locale for a new hospital complex.

Learn more about our fight to save Mid-City. Or, take action now!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Take action today to protect the "world's longest art gallery" from the December 19 oil and gay lease sale.

Take action today to protect the "world's longest art gallery" from the December 19 oil and gas lease sale.

A lot can happen in a day, and we have exactly eleven of them left to make our case in Nine Mile Canyon.

On December 19, the Utah State Office of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will hold an oil and gas lease sale for hundreds of thousands of acres of land in Utah, including areas in and near Nine Mile Canyon as well as areas just outside of Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park and Dinosaur National Monument. If issued as proposed, the lease sale would elevate the already high levels of industrial traffic in the canyon, which creates clouds of dust and corrosive chemicals that then settle on and damage fragile and ancient rock art panels.

While some recent developments have been positive - including the December 2 announcement of eight lease deferrals around Nine Mile Canyon - we aren't there yet, as sixteen art-rich parcels remain in the scope of the proposed sale.

There's still time to make a difference, but we need your voice.

Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation issued a national action alert to drum up support for additional deferrals. Join us in urging Congress to persuade the Bureau of Land Management to protect irreplaceable panels of rock art by removing the remaining gas and oil leases in and around Nine Mile Canyon. Using our online letter form, you can get involved in a matter of minutes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.