Meet This Week's Faces in Preservation

Posted on: January 6th, 2009 by Jason Clement

 

This week, Faces in Preservation is back with a look at preservation movers and shakers who are leading by example through innovative stewardship and funding programs.

Jerome “PopAgee” Johnson
He's a self-professed "soldier of jazz," and he's leading a movement to restore the New Orleans landmarks where Buddy Bolden, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton and Louis Armstrong got their start. His name is Jerome "PopAgee" Johnson, and with the help of Save America's Treasures, he is going save America's music. >> Read More

Noël Strattan & Ira Beckerman
Noël Strattan and Ira Beckerman are two archaeologists whose mission to change the way Pennsylvania catalogues its historic and cultural resources has evolved into an innovative national model for Section 106 done right. >> Read More

Intended to supplement our policy platform for President-Elect Barack Obama, Faces in Preservation is a weekly showcase of preservationists who are amazing examples of the kind of work we are hoping to see more of in the future. Stay tuned as we continue to explore new fields and new faces in the days leading up to the Inauguration.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 

President Lincoln's Cottage in Winter, Photo by Jessica King.

President Lincoln's Cottage in Winter, Photo by Jessica King

Lists and Resolutions Abound: Here's 20 things that Place Economics learned about Historic Preservation while blogging on the subject over the past year. [PlaceEconomics]

2008: A Year of Resilience: Historic Sites Weblog looks at the weather-related calamities of the past year and what can be done to prepare for the future. [Nation Trust Historic Sites]

Coastal Engineering in the Netherlands: The situation in the Low-Countries can often be seen as resembling threats that continue to face our own Gulf Coast regions like New Orleans and Galveston. "More than half of the Netherlands sits below sea level, and if a megastorm were to break through these not-so-formidable dunes, the water could inundate Rotterdam and surrounding cities within 24 hours, flooding thousands of square miles, paralyzing the nation's economy, and devastating an area inhabited by more than 2 million people." [Wired]

Is the Dubaian Dream Dead in 2009?: With falling oil prices and an unstable global economy, the Dubai-building boom may be on the way to bust. Tree Hugger has followed the "sometimes 'green'" development in the emirate over the course of 2008. [Tree Hugger]

Fortifications Tour: It may have been canceled for 2009, but it sounded extremely cool. "We will study the architectural responses to conflict; their continuing evolution and adaptation to new technology, tactics and politics; as well as their impact on the national, urban and individual scale in the built environment and landscape..." [BLDGBLOG]

Historic Site Tourism: Tiger Style: In order to help make ancient Buddhist temple tourism more profitable, the town of Guandu has done what any village in time of need would do; turn to the local Shaolin masters. "Guandu officials say they will get no money from the deal, but they hope the Shaolin mystique will pull in the kind of crowds that have turned the flagship monastery, in Henan Province, into one of China’s most popular tourist destinations. Mr. Dou said the government would save the $88,000 once spent on temple maintenance each year. They are also counting on the tax revenue from a vast new mall that is nearing completion next to the temple complex." (Meth and Ghostface could not be reached for comment.) [New York Times: Asia/Pacific]

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

New Year, New Travels

Posted on: January 2nd, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Beautiful Aiken, South Carolina is just one of 110 historic locations already included in our ongoing list of Distinctive Destinations.

Where will 2009 take you?

If you're looking for an antidote to cultural homogenization, consider visiting a city or town that is listed as one of our Dozen Distinctive Destinations.

Every year for the past decade, we've unveiled a list of places that offer authentic visitor experiences by combining dynamic downtowns, cultural diversity, attractive architecture, cultural landscapes, and strong commitments to historic preservation and revitalization. There are lots of options. In fact, you'll find 110 different locations in 42 states and Puerto Rico that are fun, family friendly and refreshingly original.

The list runs from Aiken, South Carolina to Woodstock, Illinois (sorry, we don't have a "Y" or "Z" named towns, yet). These places are home to great stories about interesting people and events, remarkable historic sites, and memorable places to eat, shop, and stay. What National Trust for Historic Preservation President Richard Moe said earlier this year about the 2008 list really applies to all of the sites listed over the past decade: “These communities represent the richness and diversity of America’s cultural heritage, and in preserving their historic fabric and spirit of place are models for other towns and cities.”

So, in thinking about the places you want to go in the new year, be sure to check our list first. And stay tuned because on January 13, your travel options will increase by twelve when we announce our Dozen Distinctive Destinations of 2009.

–Nord Wennerstrom

Nord Wennerstrom is the Director of Communications at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Here’s to Our Treasures

Posted on: January 1st, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Something

North Carolina's Cupola House is just one of 40 preservation projects to receive a Save America's Treasure challenge grant (Photo: Cupola House).

Just in time for the holidays, 40 preservation projects across the country will be raising a glass to more than just the New Year – they are among a select group of historic sites and collections that were recently awarded a Save America’s Treasures (SAT) challenge grant. This prestigious national program is providing $10.52 million in preservation and conservation dollars to an impressive and diverse list of nationally significant projects.

While the historic collections of Jamestowne and Valley Forge help tell the beginning chapters of the birth of our nation, two Frank Lloyd Wright buildings – Unity Temple in Oak Park, IL, and the Annie Pfeiffer Chapel in Lakeland, FL – stand testament to one of the preeminent figures in the story of America’s built environment. South Dakota’s Clowser Collection holds rare artifactual remnants of the Northern Plains and other American Indian tribes. In the nation’s capital, the 1910 Howard Theatre remains a cultural landmark of the African-American community and is being restored as the anchor for a larger effort to revitalize a neighborhood once known as “Black Broadway.” Edenton, NC, was an early booming port under British rule and its colonial-era Cupola House is the finest example of Jacobean design south of New England. Meanwhile, out West, the history of Tulsa’s oil boom is reflected in the opulence of its magnificent art deco buildings, and the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture is conserving important architectural drawings, photographs and other artifacts associated with the Art Deco school.

The list of winners goes on and on, but as you can see, these awardees are as varied as the American experience.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

This week is what I refer to annually as the Week of Lists.

From magazines to the Internet, the outgoing year is relived in every imaginable category. In addition to Time's People of the Year, I've read about 2008's highest-grossing movies, most outrageous Hollywood moments (a perennial favorite of mine), biggest YouTube videos, top-earning business tycoons, most memorable campaign gaffes, hottest food trends, most prolific buzzwords (change!) and best television advertisements.

Talk about a whole lot of nothing, huh?

Today, as we make big plans to celebrate an even bigger night, there are residents in Lower Mid-City New Orleans who are making the kind of plans most of us will never be faced with in our lifetimes: where am I going to go if my house gets demolished?

While the fate of this historic neighborhood is still painfully unclear, we wanted to use today to look back at 2008 as a year that saw the residents of Lower Mid-City - and their many advocates from New Orleans to Washington, D.C. - come together to fight for what's fair, right and responsible. So, in between reading about the year's biggest breakups and worst-dressed A-listers, please take a moment to read our special year-end list, What We Would Miss About Lower Mid-City.

Unlike the others, it won't rot your brain, but touch your heart. And when you're done, consider taking a moment to make a difference by telling a friend about our Mid-City website, sending a letter or posting a video on Facebook.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.