Call for Abstracts: International Archive of Women in Architecture Center (IAWA)

Posted on: March 10th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Editor's Note: As part of our ongoing Women's History Month coverage, we're sharing the request below, which came to us via the Society of Architectural Historians email list.

Due Date: March 15, 2009

The International Archive of Women in Architecture (IAWA) organization was founded in 1985 as a joint commitment of the College of Architecture and Urban Studies and the University Libraries at Virginia Tech. The mission of the IAWA organization was and continues to be to document the history of women’s involvement in architecture, interior and industrial design, landscape architecture, urban design and planning, architectural history and criticism, and the records of women’s professional organizations through the collection of material evidence. These collected works of women are housed in the Special Collections Department of the University Libraries. The IAWA scope is international, and therefore, is administered by an international board of advisors.

Goals of the IAWA:

  • Find and preserve the records of the pioneer generation of women;
  • Serve as a center for research about these occupations;
  • Appeal to retired and active women in these professions to save their papers and to consider donating them;
  • Act as a clearing house of information on the history and activities of all women in architecture…and further public education through research on the history of women in these professions through seminars, exhibits, and publications;
  • Foster cooperation between all libraries or archives containing data on, or collecting material on, women in architecture, design, and planning.

The IAWA Center collects books, biographical information, and published materials as part of its mission to act as a clearinghouse of information about all women in architecture, past and present.

In celebration of the 25th year anniversary of the Archives, an International Conference of the IAWA Center will be held in Blacksburg, Virginia at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University where the archives are held.

Scholars are asked to submit a 500 word abstract in English describing their research on women in architecture and the related fields as defined by the IAWA Center. Please include name, professional affiliation (if applicable), address, telephone numbers, e-mail address, and a current CV.

Preference will be given to papers that address women whose materials are contained within the collection of the IAWA Center. Selected authors will be asked to develop their research into a paper (2500-5000 words) for publication in the IAWA Center 25th Anniversary Monograph to accompany the conference.

All submissions should be sent to ltucker@vt.edu Dr. Lisa Tucker, IAWA Advisor Executive Committee, School of Architecture + Design, 201 Cowgill Hall (0205), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA.

Information about the archives can be found at http://spec.lib.vt.edu/IAWA/

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

A Power Lunch with Team Way Outside the Beltwayers

Posted on: March 10th, 2009 by Jason Clement

 

Team Way Outside the Beltwayers does lunch at the Longworth.

I’ve only been on the Hill for a few hours, and already I’ve learned several important lessons.

Number One: Heavily starched white shirts and grayscale suits comprise the unspoken dress code for gentlemen on the Hill. Apparently, no one got the memo (as I did) that purple is the new black this season. Geez, folks.

Number Two: The vending machines in the congressional building hallways should be nominated as Wonders of the World, as they accept all major credit cards, dispense both hot and cold food items, and sell household items and DVDs.

Number Three: All the stories you hear about the “Hill buzz” are absolutely true. This is, after all, the natural habitat of our lawmakers and their overworked, bleary–eyed staff. So, to join in the fun, I asked my lunch crew of Team Way Outside the Beltwayers to chime in with some of the interesting things they’ve seen, heard and said in their meetings so far today.

Mary Rossi: “I was pleased with Rep. Larsen’s staffer and his level of engagement with my team. And, we learned that the Omnibus Bill will be the same in the Senate as it is in the House. Surprise!”

Flo Lentz: “I was pleased to hear that Preserve America funding may be secure this year after all!”

Joan Murray Simpson: “In my meeting with Rep. Baird’s staffers, I emphasized the fact that there is a dedicated historic preservation fund with $2.7 billion in funds.”

Sonya A. Quitslund: “I was encouraged that the Community Restoration and Revitalization Act will be reintroduced next month. It will extend the 20% tax credit to smaller projects. That will further promote housing and economic development.”

Chris Moore: “I met with Rep. Baird’s staff and the legislation side for Rep. McDermott. It always amazes me how sympathetic and engaged the staffers are to our issues, even if they are not that familiar with them. After my first two meetings, I am hopeful the House mark-ups for the Save America’s Treasures and Preserve America grant programs will be retained.”

And with that, I would like to share my favorite moment so far (the blogger gets a voice too!). Joan (quoted above) was telling me and a few newbie team members about her former career as a small town mayor. After explaining how rewarding and challenging that time in her life was, she looked down at her near-empty iced coffee and said with a sigh, “Yeah, I’ve really been trying to get out of politics.”

As hundreds of hardcore lobbyists and frenzied Hill staffers literally scarfed down their made-to-go salads and sandwiches around us, I couldn’t help but playfully say with a smile, “Yeah, not sure that is ever going to happen.”

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

Way Outside the Beltway TV: Exit Interview with Mary Rossi

Posted on: March 10th, 2009 by Jason Clement

 

 

Literally minutes after the door swung open from her first Hill meeting ever (and she was also the lead!), I snagged Mary Rossi for a quick one-on-one next to one of the only sources of natural light that we could find.

Stay tuned today and tomorrow as I post more exit interviews from Team Way Outside the Beltwayers.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

Segregated African-American Housing in Wisconsin Now Rent-to-Own

Posted on: March 10th, 2009 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Fairbanks Flats, Beloit, Wisconsin

In Beloit, Wisconsin, Fairbanks Flats are a rare example of segregated company housing, the only known community housing built exclusively for black workers in the state still standing. The Wisconsin Field Office and Midwest Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation worked with local advocates, the Wisconsin State Historic Preservation Office, and the city of Beloit to first discourage the demolition of Fairbanks Flats and then encourage its successful rehabilitation.

The Beloit city council voted to tear down the properties in 2001 and the Midwest Office and its partners responded, including involvement of the Legal Department of the National Trust. This public pressure and a change in a new city manager allowed local advocates to propose feasible future uses of the property. Public pressure primarily included local advocates speaking at public meetings on the subject and local letters to the editor, also some regional interest, specifically those involved with the historically black Chicago area Bronzeville also lending their support and importance of African American history and preservation.

One local advocate, Wanda Sloan, was a Diversity Scholarship Program winner and attended the National Preservation Conference in 2004. She was able to network with other communities nationwide specific to African-American and industrial history and found their examples of adaptive use as excellent models. After many proposed development scenarios the Flats are being developed by Gorman and Company as affordable housing. The groundbreaking ceremony has taken place, open houses continue on the housing units, and Fairbanks Flats will be filled with residents once again. Gorman & Company is currently renting these units.

A successful project that engaged a local diverse population in preserving heritage, saved a historic place, and further found incentives for an adaptive reuse. The Wisconsin Field Office is pleased to remain involved with these great efforts.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Fairbanks Flats is used by the Wisconsin Historical Society in their education materials for classrooms across the state and is also a popular project for National History Day students.

--Trent Margrif

Trent Margrif is the director of the Wisconsin Field Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

From left to right, Suzy Staffer, Sherry SHPO, Preservation Pete and Connie Constituent.

And Suzy Staffer and Congressman Stuffington, too.

No, I haven't gone crazy and these aren't my imaginary friends. They're all characters from an advocacy 101 skit that I had the privilege of taking in yesterday as the training portion of Preservation Lobby Day 2009 kicked off in grand style. Today, I'll be following Team Way Outside the Beltwayers as they complete an all-day, twelve-meeting marathon on what will be my first real trip to Capitol Hill. Here are just some of the notes I scribbled down as I tried to figure out what to expect:

  • Wear comfy shoes, as some of the buildings on Capitol Hill are far apart and downright cavernous by design.
  • Be a big time early bird. Remember that you'll have to be screened by security in every building you enter, and those lines can be up to 20-30 minutes long sometimes. Also, build in time to get lost. The office numbers/locations are unpredictable at best, especially for first-timers.
  • Because many Hill staffers are fresh out of their college poly sci classes, you might find yourself in a meeting with someone who looks like they aren't a day over 21. It's not a bad thing, especially if it puts you in the role of educator. Just be mentally prepared for what can be an initial curveball.
  • Do your homework. Things to pay close attention to are voting records, congressional committee memberships and personal interests. If you forget or don't have time, ask a few quick questions while all the hands are still shaking.
  • Don't expect that you'll get a full hour. In truth, fifteen or so minutes is average (and sufficient if you play your cards right).
  • For staffers, if you're wavering between first name only and Mr. or Ms. X, just ask. It's totally okay to do so.

    ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.