From Nature to Needlework: How Woodlawn Connects Kids to History

Posted on: September 2nd, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Katherine Malone-France, Vice President for Historic Sites

Farm Campers did Farm Chores every morning, which included everything from bug squishing and weeding, to watering and harvesting. Credit Morgan Maloney
Farm Campers did Farm Chores every morning, which included everything from bug squishing and weeding, to watering and harvesting.

Before summer slips away, I’d like to share a little bit of seasonal magic with you, courtesy of Woodlawn/Pope-Leighey, a National Trust Historic Site in Alexandria, Virginia.

At the end of July, I had the pleasure of attending a celebration marking the end of four weeks of Farm Camp at Arcadia Farm at Woodlawn. Arcadia Farm is located at Woodlawn, and is operated by the Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

This Labor Day, Celebrate Chicago’s Pullman Historic District

Posted on: August 29th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

Founded in 1880, Pullman was America’s first planned community. Credit: Cynthia Lynn
Founded in 1880, Pullman was America’s first planned model industrial community.

Labor Day: one last chance for beach vacations, barbecues, and making the most of summer’s warm weather before the autumn chill sets in. What many Americans probably don’t realize, however, is that the origins of this holiday weren’t nearly as idyllic.

As it so happens, the roots of Labor Day are closely tied to one of our National Treasures, Chicago’s Pullman National Historic District.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

9 Iconic Movie Sets, Starring … The Antiquities Act

Posted on: August 28th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

An R2-D2 character visits Death Valley (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars"). Credit: Alyse & Remi, Flickr
An R2-D2 figure visits Death Valley National Park (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars").

The Antiquities Act may sound like a dusty old piece of legislation, a relic of a bygone era that long ago ceased to have relevance for average Americans. But you will spill your popcorn to learn that the Antiquities Act -- considered America’s first preservation law enacted in 1906 -- continues to play a critical role in protecting places across the country that have been featured in some of Hollywood’s best-known blockbusters.

From “Star Wars” to “Titanic,” from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” some of our most beloved movies were filmed in landscapes protected by the Antiquities Act. Here, we feature some of our favorites.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Historic Bars] The Monkey Bar in New York

Posted on: August 27th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we sashay our way into America’s historic cocktail lounges, the upscale gin joints where high society has sipped sophistication for decades. This week, we check out Monkey Bar in New York City.

The Monkey Bar was purchased in 2009 by Vanity Fair editor-in-chief Graydon Carter and hotelier Jeff Klein and underwent a full restoration. Credit: Christopher Dorsey/Monkey Bar
The Monkey Bar was purchased in 2009 by Vanity Fair editor-in-chief Graydon Carter and hotelier Jeff Klein and underwent a full restoration.

If you’re in the Big Apple and on the prowl for Jazz Age ambiance, a stiff bourbon smash, and some classic clams casino, look no further than the Monkey Bar in Midtown. Featured as a backdrop to both Carrie Bradshaw and Don Draper’s cocktail-fueled adventures in episodes of Sex and the City and Mad Men, the Monkey Bar has been a home for free-spirited writers, tortured ad men, and other thirsty New Yorkers for close to eight decades.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Written by Raina Regan, Community Preservation Specialist, Indiana Landmarks

Aerial view of the plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Credit: American Museum of Science and Energy
Aerial view of the plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Science, secrecy, and a large sense of scale uniquely identify those sites associated with the Manhattan Project. Of the three primary sites -- Los Alamos, New Mexico; Hanford, Washington; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee -- the latter has always captured my interest because of its moniker “The Secret City.”

The Manhattan Engineer District built an entirely new military reservation on 59,000 acres in an isolated area of rural Tennessee. Construction on the site began in 1942, with the townsite located in the northeast corner of the six-mile-long reservation. Clinton Engineer Works, the Army’s name for the Oak Ridge Manhattan Project site during World War II, hosted the Project’s uranium enrichment plants (K-25 and Y-12) and the pilot plutonium production reactor (X-10).

After reading Denise Kiernan’s The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II and supporting the proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park, I felt compelled to visit the city which had fascinated me for years. I convinced my sister, a fellow history buff who had also recently read Kiernan’s book, to take an atomic-inspired road trip to eastern Tennessee.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

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Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.