Oak Alley Plantation, Host to Vampires and Beyoncé

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 5 Comments

 

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The Oak Alley Plantation house was completed in 1839 and first restored in 1925.

In this summer’s upcoming issue of Preservation, we bring you the story of the Lombard Plantation house in New Orleans, one of the only surviving structures from the city’s 19th-century agricultural past. Period furniture and a plethora of original details, like hand-stenciled wallpaper and preserved pine floors, are just a few of the features that give the 1826 Creole-style home such a strong connection to the city’s heritage.

These remarkable historical characteristics were part of what made Hollywood location scouts single it out for the 2006 time-travel thriller "Déjà Vu," starring Denzel Washington. Its relatively modest footprint ultimately wasn’t big enough to accommodate the necessary camera equipment and crews, but set designers were able to recreate an exact replica of the house’s first floor in a New Orleans warehouse, creating an authentic backdrop for the film’s events.

While Louisiana does have tax incentives meant to entice filmmakers to the Pelican State, its unique historic architecture and natural beauty are photogenic enough to form the perfect setting for any unfolding fictional drama. One particularly popular filming location is Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie, about an hour’s drive from New Orleans.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Sacred Native American Sites: Bear Butte and Wind Cave

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

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Bear Butte State Park, which the Lakota refer to as Mato Paha and the Cheyenne call Noahvose, was established as a state park in 1961.

The Black Hills of South Dakota offer inspiring landscapes with a rugged vitality steeped in history and tradition. In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, writer Reed Karaim documents his journey through the sacred lands that have been home to Native American tribes for generations.

Along the way he visits two of the region’s most enchanting natural wonders -- Bear Butte and Wind Cave -- and speaks with Jace DeCory, member of the Lakota-Cheyenne River Sioux tribe and assistant professor of American Indian Studies at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

If you followed our Down to the Wire campaign to save the James River this spring, you probably noticed a crucial piece of our outreach: the online petition hosted by Change.org.

Change.org is the world’s largest petition platform, with nearly 100 million users in 196 countries. Such widespread use around countless causes and campaigns underscores the power of combining a time-tested tool -- the petition -- with social media and global connectivity.

In today’s toolkit, we’re walking you through top tips for a successful online petition on Change.org so that you can better raise your voice about the preservation issues you care about.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Summer Concert Series] Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): Johnny Cash, June Carter, Carl Perkins, the Tennessee Three, and the Statler Brothers

Venue: Folsom State Prison

Location: Represa, California

Date: January 13, 1968

Memorable Moment: The night before the show, Cash was presented with an original recording of an inmate who was serving life at Folsom. He liked the song, “Greystone Chapel,” so much, he recorded it as part of the show the next day.

Show Vibe: Roughly 1,000 inmates desperate for entertainment but surrounded by armed guards provided a unique atmosphere.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Ride Through History on These Historic Zoo Trains

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson No Comments

 

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The Fleishhacker Playfield Limited, or "Little Puffer," has been at the San Francisco Zoo since 1925.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we feature the Zooliner and the Centennial, two beloved miniature vintage trains at the Oregon Zoo that were restored and are now fully functional. In today’s post, we encourage you to hop aboard three additional historic trains and take a ride through history at the San Francisco Zoo, Detroit Zoo, and St. Louis Zoo.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

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Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House, a National Trust Historic Site.

"St. Laurentius Roman Catholic Church in Fishtown moved one crucial step closer to being protected from the wrecking ball today when the Historical Commission’s Committee on Historic Designation unanimously ruled in favor of recommending the Edwin Forrest Durang-designed Gothic sanctuary to be considered for historic designation by the full Commission at their meeting on July 12. Buildings listed on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places are legally protected from demolition." -- Hidden City Philadelphia: Committee Recommends St. Laurentius For Historic Designation

"As it is, many preservationists worry that Midtown could soon reach a tipping point in which the architectural mix of old and new is lost to a wash of sparkly glass. Of about 36 recently demolished sites that the Historic Districts Council deemed worthy of preservation, 12 were in Midtown." -- New York Times: Midtown’s Vanishing Historic Architecture... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.