Written by Sarah Fitts, Atlanta Movie Tours

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The Castleberry Hill neighborhood has been featured in films such as "Driving Miss Daisy," "Sweet Home Alabama," and "Ride Along."

Recently, Atlanta, Georgia, has become known as "The Hollywood of the South." Right now, over 35 television shows and movies are filming in and around the city. And although Atlanta’s movie business is just beginning to boom, there are several places in the city and in surrounding areas that have been saved from -- or face the threat of -- demolition.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Saving Places with a Twist: Preservation-Themed Booze

Posted on: April 8th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 4 Comments

 

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The Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails (LUPEC) meet once a month to socialize, network, and have a good cocktail.

If you’ve been following the hype around The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament, you can understand how preservation and alcohol can combine to make an intoxicating mix. As the Big Tap rounds up this week (have you voted for the champion yet?), we’d like to highlight some fascinating groups with preservation ties to one of our favorite vices.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

By Boyce Thompson

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Rancho Joaquina was designed by renowned Phoenix architects Lee Fitzhugh and Lester Byron in the Spanish Colonial Revival style.

Marc and Karen Goldblatt were ready to unwind after a hectic week hosting events at Rancho Joaquina, the ninety-year-old historic home they own in Phoenix.

First, the Goldblatts hosted a dinner lecture about the national political scene. Later in the week, they opened their landmark Spanish Colonial Revival home to the Arizona Historical League, which put on a catered event with food, presentations, and an informal house tour for more than 150 guests.

Now, relaxing over Saturday morning coffee, the couple was happy to relate details of their 26-year restoration odyssey, much of it guided by framed reproductions of the home’s original blueprints hanging in the pantry.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

Some old buildings need a little love.

Around Christmas in 2012, Bernice Radle of Buffalo’s Young Preservationists got the idea to put a big red bow on a nearby vacant building to spread holiday cheer. Then it occurred to her to do the same with a heart-shaped cutout the following Valentine’s Day.

Thirty people helped Bernice place giant hearts on four vacant buildings, and heart bombing was born.

Today, three of those buildings are still standing and two have new owners -- a testament to the power of showing places (and their communities) that someone cares about them.

Since that February morning in 2013, heart bombing has spread to Philadelphia, Omaha, Hawaii, and beyond. (See our 2015 round-ups here and here .) We spoke with Bernice to get her best tips for a successful heart bombing event.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Bells, Banjos, and Bullets at the Appomattox Sesquicentennial

Posted on: April 6th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Generals Grant and Lee signed surrender documents in the parlor of Wilmer McLean’s brick house (reconstructed by the Park Service in the 1940s). (credit: Jim Bowen)
Generals Grant and Lee signed surrender documents in the parlor of Wilmer McLean’s brick house (reconstructed by the Park Service in the 1940s).

On the afternoon of April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee, decked out in full dress attire, signed surrender documents in the parlor of the modest brick house of Wilmer McLean in Appomattox Court House, Virginia. They were accepted by a muddy and threadbare Ulysses S. Grant, and the Civil War was effectively over, after four bloody years.

Fast-forward to today, and the village of Appomattox Court House, including the brick home where the historic meeting between Lee and Grant took place, has become a National Historical Park, meticulously preserved by the National Park Service to bring visitors closer to this pivotal moment in our nation’s history. Starting on April 8, that history will come alive during a sesquicentennial celebration and commemoration.

NPS and the village have been preparing for this event for two years, and they’re expecting 1,100 re-enactors, as well as thousands of visitors, during the five-day event. (The Appomattox County Historical Society, which is holding a separate reenactment outside the park, is expecting about 3,600 re-enactors.) Music, reenactments and historian talks are all on the agenda, and none of the on-site events require advance reservations or tickets.

We've rounded up a few highlights below, but you can find the full list (and a map of the festivities) here. Also, don’t forget to use the hashtag #APX150th on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for all of your Appomattox-related posts.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament Final Four Recap

Posted on: April 3rd, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.
Sheridan, Wyoming's Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.

The hour is getting late and the crowd has cleared out. Two of our Final Four competitors have been bounced out the door, and there’s only one pair of lushes left at the bar. But the night is far from over, so put another dollar in the juke, pull up a stool, and watch the championship game of The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament 2015 play out.

While you’re waiting on a drink, check out the Final Four scores and cast your vote to help decide America’s favorite historic bar below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.