St. John and St. Thomas: A Supplemental Virgin Islands Travel Guide

Posted on: January 12th, 2015 by David Robert Weible No Comments

 

View of St. Thomas from Blackbeard's Castle
View of St. Thomas from Blackbeard's Castle

When I woke up in my apartment in Northwest D.C. this morning, I could practically see my breath. And as I sit here writing this, my back is turned to the outlines of downtown Washington adrift in a blotted mist of freezing rain. I’m sure many of you can relate.

But somewhere there were American citizens that woke up to a perfect 74-degree, sunlit day. They were surrounded by palm trees, warm waters, and plenty of rum. That place is St. Croix, in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The island’s human history -- spanning thousands of years and seven different colonial claims -- was explored by writer Scott Elder in the Winter 2015 issue of Preservation. And though there are enough attractions on St. Croix to last longer than your average vacation, the U.S. Virgin Islands also include St. John and St. Thomas.

Below is a guide to a few of their most interesting historical spots, if you’re ever inclined to leave a dark, cold place behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

The Randolph School in 1928
The Randolph School in 1928

After Hurricane Katrina hit the small town of Pass Christian in Mississippi, many in the community were displaced, homes were lost, and schools and churches were destroyed. However, this small community came together to fight for and save a small schoolhouse -- the Randolph School, one of the few remaining Rosenwald Schools in Mississippi.

“Here was a town facing every problem known to man… they didn’t have lights, sewers, water, streets, anything,” says Lolly Barnes, Executive Director of the Mississippi Heritage Trust. “And yet they said this building was worthy of saving.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O’Connor is the member services assistant at the National Trust. She enjoys learning, writing, and talking about museums, art, architecture, and anything historic.

[Historic Bars] Alibi Bar & Lounge in Boston

Posted on: January 8th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 2 Comments

 

What's more fun than a historic bar? A historic bar with a theme! And that's exactly what we're featuring in our next installment of historic bars -- establishments with kitschy, unusual, and unique calling cards. First up: The Alibi Bar & Lounge in Boston.

150108_blog-photo_Alibi_sign
The Alibi Bar & Lounge in Boston opened in 2007 inside the Liberty Hotel -- formerly Charles Street Jail.

When Boston’s infamous Charles Street Jail was built in 1851, it served as an international model of prison architecture. Today, the former correctional facility is home to the cheekily-named Liberty Hotel, which opened in 2007. The hotel’s Alibi Bar & Lounge is located in the jail’s former “drunk tank” and has become a popular late-night spot for Bostonians to mingle and sip custom cocktails with prison-inspired names, like “Doin’ Thyme” and “Jail Bait.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

Industrial Strength: The Adaptive Reuse of Ames Shovel Works

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding 2 Comments

 

The historic Steam Hammer Shop, which was damaged by fire in the early 1900s.
The historic Steam Hammer Shop, which was damaged by fire in the early 1900s.

There’s nothing like the proposed demolition of a beloved property to motivate a community. For the town of Easton, Massachusetts, that property was the Ames Shovel Works, a granite-walled relic of New England’s Industrial Age. The site forms the heart of a National Register-listed historic district, and when it was threatened a few years ago, Easton’s residents weren’t going to let it go without a fight.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

By Kristi Eaton

150107_blog-photo_Native-American_michael-brown
Michael Brown, archaeologist for the Colorado Wickiup Project, records a wickiup in west central Colorado that dates to around A.D. 1795.

As the original inhabitants, Native Americans play a unique and significant part to the United States’ historic preservation efforts. In fact, Native American tribes have their own officers dedicated to preserving and restoring tribal history. (Learn more about tribal historic preservation officers, or THPOs, here.)

But for many of the more than 500 federally recognized tribes in the United States, that history is one of both pain and resiliency. Tribal members have said that some of the most painful experiences and memories include losing their land, being forced to relocate, and being forced to attend boarding schools. Restoring and preserving sites related to these periods can help educate today’s Native Americans as well as non-Native Americans about tribal history.

Below are some of the unique ways Native American communities are working in conjunction with state and federal agencies and private organizations to preserve tribal history and culture.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.