Credit: Chris Morris/National Trust for Historic Preservation
Charles Phoenix, left, was born to love kitschy American culture, retro places, and vintage cars. 

Who says history can’t be fun? Certainly not Charles Phoenix , a performer, humorist, chef, and author best known for exploring America’s pop cultural past and present. (And maybe as equally well known for his Thanksgiving dessert creation, the Cherpumple.)

This summer, Phoenix will explore a number of iconic retro places in California, including the Wig Wam Motel in San Bernadino -- where he held a one-night-only event in June to celebrate both the Rt. 66 landmark’s recent National Register listing and also its dedicated owners/restorers -- and the upcoming Moonlight Rollerway Jubilee in Glendale.

We caught up with Phoenix in between all these hopping events to learn what first instilled in him his love for kitsch, what places have inspired him over the years, and why he doesn’t consider himself a preservationist.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Historic Bars] Scholz Garten in Austin, Texas

Posted on: July 9th, 2014 by David Robert Weible No Comments

 

Over the next few weeks, PreservationNation will continue its historic bars series with America’s takes on the shady, beer-brewing bodegas that originally sprouted in the Fatherland. Our first spot is not only one of the country’s oldest beer gardens, it’s also the longest continuously operating business in its hometown. Below is a rundown of the Scholz Garten.

Credit: Carlos Lowry, Flickr
The Scholz Garten has been an Austin institution since the day the original bar opened its doors in 1866.

Pop quiz: What do all of the following things have in common?

Bunsen burners, crop rotation, kindergarten, tubas, sausage, Christmas trees, the Easter Bunny, Levi’s (and blue jeans in general), and beer gardens (or biergartens).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

In last week’s toolkit, we covered the who and what of Section 106 review, a preservation tool that can help you save a place that matters to you. Now we’re going to cover the how, which involves one of the most important parts of the process: you!

We’ve mentioned a few times just how essential public involvement is in the Section 106 review process, and we have a few pointers on how you can influence the outcome of a federal project proposal.

The review process can sometimes be a lengthy ordeal, but there are ways that you can get involved both before and after the review is completed.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She enjoys writing, spending time outdoors, and is a movie and music enthusiast.

[11 Most Endangered] Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

Credit: David Casteel
Mokuaikaua Church was built in 1837 by Hawaii's first Christian missionaries. 

The ohia wood rafters in the sanctuary of the Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, have been sheltering worshipers since 1837, when King Kamehameha II gave Hawaii's first Christian missionaries his blessing to build the structure just a stone's throw from the ocean.

Mokauikaua -- 177 years later -- has become immeasurably valuable in not only giving residents of Kailua-Kona on Hawaii’s Big Island a beautiful place to meet and worship, but also in helping to tell the state’s unique story. Pastor David de Carvalho, the 31st to serve at the church, estimates that it welcomes about 400 people every Sunday, an even split of regulars and tourists eager to experience a service in the Aloha State's oldest house of worship.

That’s why, in light of structural damage from a 6.6 magnitude earthquake in 2006 and a slew of problems due to typical wear-and-tear in Hawaii's tropical climate, the National Trust decided to grant the church a place on its 2014 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Uptop, Colorado: A Ghost Town With a Beating Heart

Posted on: July 7th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 1 Comment

 

Credit: Larry Lamsa, Flickr
Uptop, Colorado, was settled in 1877, but remains a ghost town outside La Veta.

When you hear the term “ghost town,” you probably imagine a diminishing population, failing industries, and bleak economic fortunes. That’s why the story of Uptop, Colorado -- a 40-acre settlement, established in 1877, near the town of La Veta -- paves the way for a newer understanding of what it means to be a ghost town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.