Visitors to the James River see largely the same view as Captain John Smith did when he traveled the historic waterway in 1607.
Visitors to the James River see largely the same view as Captain John Smith did when he traveled the historic waterway in 1607.

The James River is “America’s founding river,” yet not everyone has the opportunity to visit it in person. So for this entire week, we at Preservation Nation are taking you on a virtual trip down this beautiful, historic waterway, so you can see for yourself what would be lost if Dominion Virginia Power goes through with its disruptive power line proposal.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 


Modern Ruin: A World's Fair Pavilion - Promo I from Matthew Silva on Vimeo.

For the past three years, the futuristic New York State Pavilion -- a National Treasure looking for a new future of its own – has enchanted many people with its dramatic design and World Fair history. One of those people became so enchanted that he decided to make a film about the structure -- a passion project that quickly grew into a larger grassroots campaign to save the Pavilion.

That person is Matthew Silva, co-founder of People for the Pavilion and the filmmaker behind the documentary “Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion.” His tireless efforts behind the camera, on social media, and at the site itself have not only helped get more people talking about the Pavilion, but it’s brought them together as well, focusing their energy on reinvention for an inventive space.

This week, the documentary that started it all three years ago is having its world premiere. So before the curtain goes up, we chatted with Silva to learn more about his fascinating route from schoolteacher to filmmaker to preservation advocate.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

Welcome to a recently added feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The staff at Indiana Landmarks says #ThisPlacesMatters about the Indiana Landmarks Center.
The staff at Indiana Landmarks says #ThisPlacesMatters about the Indiana Landmarks Center.

"Yes, but in our architectural firm we felt increasingly uncomfortable with the obligation to constantly surpass ourselves. Then we embraced the theme of preservation. It requires intelligence, precision and creativity -- and there's no expectation that we'll be making a huge splash. Conversions are more about concepts than effects." Rem Koolhaas Interview: 'We Shouldn't Tear Down Buildings We Can Still Use' (Spiegel Online)

"To me, preservation is about celebrating the evolution of a building, and working to ensure it remains a viable part of its neighborhood, while maintaining (as best as possible) the historic integrity of the site." Celebrating Change: The Growth of a Kentucky Log House (Gardens to Gables)

"Historic preservation is a conversation with our past about our future. It provides us with opportunities to ask, 'What is important in our history?' and 'What parts of our past can we preserve for the future?'" The National Park Service & Historic Preservation (Yes, this is not really an article, but it's hard to resist the lovely new preservation website from our friends at the National Park Service.)

"Asheville's many breweries are popular gathering spots for cold beer and good conversation. But almost without exception, every brewery building here once had a different life. They were stores, a car dealership, an auto parts shop, a cinema, a movie studio and more. They had all been discarded before being reclaimed to make and sell beer." Where beer, history collide: Breweries give old buildings new life (Asheville Citizen-Times)

Bonus:
Follow #beersavesplaces on Twitter and Instagram for more stories and photos of breweries in historic buildings.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

National Trust staff at the James River, one of our National Treasures.
National Trust staff at the James River, one of our National Treasures.

The Down to the Wire team is hard at work and on the move, letting Virginia (and the nation) know about Dominion Virginia Power’s plan to put high-voltage power lines across the beautiful, historic James River. Last week, we took the campaign to Jamestown: the birthplace of our country, and an area that would be directly impacted by these power lines.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

 

Today we continue our installment of Historic Real Estate called “Preservation Personals,” where we let the historic properties speak for themselves. Today's personal is ...

150513_blog-photo_181Bruey-Rd
181 Bruey Rd.

Underestimated Cape Cod House Seeks Owner with Discerning Eye

181 Bruey Rd -- Norfolk, Connecticut 

First impressions are everything. At first sight, you might be tempted to see a simple, unadorned, late 18th-century house. But don’t be so quick to judge a book by its cover.

If you step through my front door and take a closer look, you’ll see that my beauty is more than facade deep. You see, it’s the little things that count, like my unique captain’s stairway, central chimney with four fireplaces that make every room nothing less than cozy on a lazy day, and scenic mountain views that can entice anyone outside to explore the lush six acres I sit on.

And if family and friends want to visit and see the good fortune and luxury you’ve found in me, you can entertain them with food and tons of laughs in my spacious eat-in kitchen.

Think you have the discerning eye to see my potential? Check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

So far in our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series, we’ve covered why historic places matter, how to manage your expectations, and how to research and assess threats to a beloved place. The natural next step is, of course, how to find help -- which can be daunting in an environment where terms like “historic property” and “National Register” get thrown around interchangeably, with little explanation of who is responsible for what part of the process.

The good news is, the best bet is always to start close to home. The saying “all politics is local” is often true of preservation as well, particularly early in the process. Local laws and regulations are the first line of defense in saving many historic places and can usually get the job done, but sometimes it becomes necessary to escalate the fight to the state or even federal level. Knowing the basics of who does what at each level can make navigating preservation a great deal easier.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.