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More than a century after its construction, Seattle's single-room-occupancy Panama Hotel continues to evoke the lifestyle and culture of Japanese-Americans during the early part of the 20th century. Its current owner, Jan Johnson, has preserved the building, along with its Japanese-style bath house and collection of belongings stored by Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II.

A National Treasure of the National Trust, the Panama Hotel, has many stories to tell, and producers Laine Ross and David Vice of Seattle's Big Story Group have set out to capture as many of them as they can. Through their Panama Hotel Legacy Film project, the duo hope to honor the history of the hotel, its occupants, and its owner as the property looks for new ownership and continued preservation.

We spoke with Ross and Vice for their take on the project, the hotel, and the importance of preserving our shared history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

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During Prohibition, a grocery store on the upper level was a front for a basement-level speakeasy, called Menotti’s Buffet. Today, you can order cocktails upstairs at Townhouse or in the basement at Del Monte Speakeasy.

As you might imagine, it wasn’t easy to get into Menotti’s Buffet during Prohibition -- and I mean that in many senses of the word. First, you had to know that the speakeasy even existed there in the basement of a Venice, California, grocery store. Plus, you also had to know the bartender. And then there was the part about actually getting down to where the alcohol was served. That required going through a trapdoor and into a tiny two-person, rope-operated dumbwaiter.

But in its 100 years, this bar -- the oldest bar in Venice, and one of the oldest in the greater Los Angeles area -- has always kept the party going.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

The Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, was designed by architect Philip Johnson and built between 1947 and 1949. At the time, The Glass House’s design was a radical departure from contemporary houses in that its exterior walls were made entirely of glass and it had no interior walls or partitions. Today, this remarkable Midcentury Modern architectural achievement is a National Trust Historic Site.

Continuing the tradition of innovation and creativity at the Glass House, the Trust sponsored the installation of “Veil” by Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya during from May 1 to November 30, 2014. This site-specific artist project enveloped The Glass House in fog, giving visitors a new, extraordinary experience.

Recently, we talked with artist Fujiko Nakaya to get the inside details about the “Veil” installation and her other projects.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Chalet

Posted on: July 22nd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson No Comments

 

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The Belton Chalet in West Glacier, Montana was built in 1910.

Imagine this: a beautiful timber cottage situated at the heart of picturesque forest scene. Not only does the dwelling offer an extraordinary view of nearby mountains and trees, but it also boasts some unique vernacular architectural detail. This quaint structure is what is known as a chalet.

The Trust for Architectural Easements’ Glossary of Architectural Terms defines a chalet as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Explore the Ancestral Places of Southeast Utah

Posted on: July 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Kirsten Hower

Encompassing nearly eight thousand square miles, the Ancestral Places of Southeast Utah are home to a diverse array of sites sacred to the Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo, and Ute tribes. Throughout the area are archaeological sites, cliff dwellings, petroglyphs, and trails that are a visual narrative dedicated to twelve thousand years of human history and traditions.

Explore that narrative in our latest Exposure with stunning images from these ancestral places.


Ancestral Places of Southeast Utah by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register Guide.

Episode Three of our National Register of Historic Places Guide addressed questions and debunked myths about any requirements or restrictions the National Register imposes on listed properties.

Episode Four explains some of the less tangible reasons why listing a property on the National Register is important, and how listing a property can affect a community’s perception of itself.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.