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The first part of the African House murals.

In March, the National Trust named Melrose Plantation’s African House a National Treasure, kicking off the designation with a HOPE Crew project to restore the African House’s roof. Now, we continue to detail the African House’s historical influence and unique cultural heritage by exploring its murals and the artist who created them.

The African House murals are nine panels of folk art that depict the colorfully rich, day-to-day life and culture of the Cane River Country’s Creole inhabitants. But more than that, these murals lend insight into the life of artist Clementine Hunter during the early 20th century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Celebrating National Park Week 2015: Where History and Nature Intersect

Posted on: April 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

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Jonathan B. Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, speaks at the Jefferson Memorial on Thursday, April 16.

It’s National Park Week 2015 -- a week-long celebration hosted by the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation that encourages the public to visit, volunteer at, and share stories of their favorite parks. The week’s events include a weekend of free admission, a day of service on Earth Day, and online sharing of user photos and memories.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Photos] Animas Forks, Colorado: A Tour of a Ghost Town

Posted on: April 21st, 2015 by Lauren Walser No Comments

 

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Looking south across the ghost town of Animas Forks, Colorado, in the San Juan Mountains.

We took you to the long-abandoned mining town of Animas Forks, Colorado, in the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine. A hub for hard-rock gold and silver mining, the town was established in 1874 and abandoned just a short while later.

Today, it attracts the most intrepid of visitors, as well as a handful of dedicated preservationists who are determined to keep it alive. Here, we take you on another tour of the town, with more photos from our feature story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Four More California Wineries With Rich Histories

Posted on: April 20th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

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Wine being barrel-aged at the Gundlach Bundschu winery.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, we feature the stories of three well-aged and much-loved Northern California wineries that have weathered historical calamities to continue producing award-winning libations into the present day. There are so many others whose stories we didn’t get the chance to tell, so we thought we’d take this opportunity to do so.

Gundlach Bundschu, Freemark Abbey, Inglenook and Beringer Vineyards are all known for their rich viticultural history. Sit back, pour a glass of your favorite vintage, and read on to find out more about how each vineyard got its start and endured setbacks such as Prohibition and the 2014 Napa Valley Earthquake.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Chamfer

Posted on: April 17th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi 3 Comments

 

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Example of a lamb's tongue chamfer carved in wood.

Are you a preservation word nerd? Do you seek out wild, obscure, fun-to-say-aloud terms and phrases, the kind that only place-lovers would thrill to? If so, you're in luck -- we're starting a new segment on PreservationNation called Preservation Glossary, designed to define a bite-sized word for you each week to satisfy your craving for preservation vocabulary. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

By Tyler Anthony Smith

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The "Two Sisters" houses were home to African-American ship caulkers between 1842-1854.

Have you ever noticed two small, 218-year-old, wood-sided houses on South Wolfe Street in Baltimore’s Fell’s Point? The Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fell’s Point owns these buildings, often referred to as the “Two Sisters,” which likely date to 1797 -- the same year that the U.S. Frigate Constellation was built in a Fell’s Point ship yard.

Originally part of a building with four identical units, the remaining "Two Sisters" each stand just twelve feet wide and fifteen feet deep, with a single room on the first floor and a half story garret above. The buildings housed many working Baltimore residents, including African-American ship caulkers Richard Jones, Henry Scott, and John Whittington from 1842 to 1854. As ship caulkers they are associated with a unique Baltimore story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.