[Summer Concert Series] James Brown at the Apollo Theater

Posted on: July 28th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): James Brown and the Famous Flames (Bobby Byrd, Bobby Bennett, and Lloyd Stallworth)
Venue: The Apollo Theater
Location: Harlem, New York City
Date: October 24, 1962
Memorable Moment: After nearly 11 minutes of practically torturing the crowd with “Lost Someone,” Brown slips into "Please Please Please." The crowd responds like the building is collapsing. It’s incredible.
Show Vibe: Thirty-one minutes of desperate flirtation between entertainer and audience swelling with funk, anguish, and lust.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register Guide.

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Episode Five of our National Register Guide covers the basics of the National Register nomination form.

Episode Four of our National Register of Historic Places Guide explained some of the less tangible reasons why listing a property on the National Register is important, and how listing a property can affect a community’s perception of itself.

Episode Five dives into the basics of filling out a National Register nomination form, and answers questions like:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Travel] Discover the History of NYC’s Meatpacking District In 24 Hours

Posted on: July 27th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Jeana C. Wiser

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The Meatpacking District in New York City is a must-see neighborhood that provides an unique opportunity to explore an old place experiencing rapid change in a hyper-urban context.

When I first moved to NYC, one of the neighborhoods I was immediately charmed by was the Meatpacking District. With its original cobblestone streets (to be more specific, they are technically called Belgian Blocks) and historic buildings, the place teemed with magnetic energy, magic, style, and charm.

This is a place where people want to be -- locals and visitors, alike -- so much so that I would be remiss to not mention that this neighborhood is also one experiencing some of the most intense development pressures, and therefore, skyrocketing rents (the ever-present, double-edged sword of an evolving and vibrant neighborhood).

Despite its popularity and never-ending weekend crowds, this neighborhood is a must-see. It’s a 20-square-block, 24-hour neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan, flanked by Chelsea Market to the north and Horatio Street to the south. For preservationists and others who feel drawn to places rich in layered histories, the Meatpacking District provides a unique opportunity to engage in the tangible and intangible exploration of an old place experiencing rapid change, in a hyper-urban context.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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Julia Morgan designed the pool at the Berkeley City Club, now a Historic Hotel of America.

Ever since our first historic pools post earlier this season, the PreservationNation staff haven’t been able to get enough of Julia Morgan-designed swimming pools. So, as we get into the dog days of summer, we figured we’d dive back in with an interview with National Trust Chief Marketing Officer and unofficial expert on the iconic architect’s aquatic wonders, Amy Maniatis.

As a Bay Area native, Amy spent her fair share of time lounging on the decks of two of Morgan’s most treasured creations, the Berkeley City Club pool and the Hearst Pool on the campus of UC Berkeley. Below, we finally put all of Amy’s leisure hours to work for a peek into why Julia Morgan’s pools were about more than a quick dip.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

The Plaza Hotel, New York City
The Plaza Hotel, New York City

"The Plaza Hotel is one of the oldest and most famous buildings in the city, now over a hundred years old. For decades, it was the meeting place of Manhattan’s wealthiest socialites, and still remains, in some part, today. Most interesting to us though in its 100 year history are some of its most eye-catching secrets." Untapped Cities - The Top 10 Secrets of the Plaza Hotel in NYC

"The portico at Drayton Hall, the historic 18th-century house on the Ashley River, was repaired with large concrete beams sometime during the 20th century, but those in charge of caring for the museum house weren’t sure exactly when. But when workers recently began removing that concrete as part of a larger renovation project, they discovered a small piece of red paper. On it was printed a Nabisco logo, and Trish Smith, Drayton Hall’s curator of architectural resources, says that logo was used from 1923-41. As a result, the best estimate now places the portico repair no earlier than 1923 and not much later than 1941." Post and Courier - Decades later, a worker’s snack wrapper offers clue to Drayton Hall repair... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

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W.R.J. Camp House

William R.J. Camp House Seeks Ambitious First-Time Historic House Buyer

2620 Church Street -- Greenville, Texas

Though my Italian-imported, Greek Revival pillars may seem opulent, don’t be too intimidated by my resplendent appearance.

I’m actually the type of house that offers all the trappings for a polite, understated price. I have many of my original historic fixtures as well as some amazing perks (like a second-story balcony with great views and a porte-cochère). I also have wonderful modern amenities such as kitchen and bathroom additions and updated electrical and plumbing systems.

But dear, this is only the beginning. With all these advantages, in addition to a great price, just image all the things we can do together.

Ready to get started? Check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.