150601_blog-photo_Rio-Grande-station
The Rio Grande Café is located inside the former Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Station that was built in 1910.

In our last post we invited you to take a trip to three historic train depots that have been revamped into swanky restaurants which offer both warm hospitality and meals that will make your taste buds sing. Today, we’re introducing you to three more historic train depots-turned-eateries, each with their own culinary delights. So pack your bags and get ready for an excursion to a foodie’s paradise.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About the Original Whitney Studio

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

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The Titanic Memorial in Washington, D.C. was designed by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and carved by artist John Horrigan.

By Whitney Studio National Treasure Team

On May 1, the Whitney Museum of American Art opened the doors of its new building which sits alongside the Hudson River in New York’s Meatpacking District. The building itself is a masterpiece by architect Renzo Pianos, who openly acknowledges the building’s unique design as having several aeronautical aspects.

We know from our National Treasures work with the original Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village (now part of the New York School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture) that this unique history is one that is continually taking shape. And because of that, we offer five lesser known facts about Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and the original Whitney Museum of American Art.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Weekend Reads from Curbed, BBC News, Building Histories, and More

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Sarah Heffern

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

King Street, looking north, Charleston, S.C., c. 1910
King Street in Charleston, S.C., c. 1910

"Until recently, the former clothing store at the southeast corner of King and Mary streets had stood vacant for more than two decades, a most visible symbol of Upper King’s once sad state. Today, the modest brick and stucco building has been resurrected as 492, a chic restaurant space that weaves together the city’s best kind of architecture: a blend of heroic preservation work with clever and complementary new design." -- The Post and Courier: Restaurants a driving force in restoring downtown’s historic buildings... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Follow the Gold Record Road: The Americana Music Triangle, Part 1

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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This sculpture in Congo Square, New Orleans, pays homage to the enslaved workers who gathered there on Sundays to sell goods, dance, and play music.

The Americana Music Triangle is a stretch of land between Nashville, Memphis and New Orleans where a swirl of cultures and influences helped to form no fewer than nine uniquely American genres of music: blues, jazz, country, rock n’ roll, R&B/soul, gospel, southern gospel, Cajun/zydeco, and bluegrass. It includes the hot, swampy marshland that gave birth to the Delta Blues and the legendary recording studios of Nashville and Memphis that launched the careers of countless American icons like B.B King, Elvis and Johnny Cash. It’s a place that will tell you almost anything you want to know about the roots of American music, if you know where to look -- and listen.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] How to Save a Place: Get the Word Out

Posted on: May 28th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi

 

Preservation Month 2015 comes to a close this weekend, but everyone’s hard work to save places that matter to them will continue for months, years, and decades to come. So, for our final installment of the How to Save a Place series, we’re sharing ways you can continue to rally community support for your project.

Methods range from public relations to social media outreach, and from pop-up shops to community tours. (And don’t forget the other popular tactics in our Become an Advocate toolkit!) Here are a variety of tools, techniques, and tips to help you shine a light on the places you love.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

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Author Jamie Ford at the Panama Hotel (left), actress Stephanie Kim as Keiko and actor Jose Abaoag as Henry in Book-It Theatre's stage adaptation of Ford's novel "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet" (right).

“A silent character.” That’s how Jamie Ford, author of “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet,” describes the Panama Hotel, the titular National Treasure that grounds his bestselling novel. But the Panama is far from silent; it continues to bustle with tours and visitors, giving them a glimpse into Ford’s fictional world while also portraying the true and moving history of Japanese-American internment in the United States.

As both author and preservationist, Ford is in a unique position to comment on the significance of place in his well-known work. So we chatted with him to find out more – like why he chose to incorporate the hotel in his book in the first place, how it felt to introduce the hotel to an international audience, and why we should all aim to become part of a greater “story chain.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.