Credit: Tyler Machado, Flickr
Salvador’s Ice Cream was built in New Bedford, Mass., but the business and physical structure was moved to South Dartmouth in 1935.

During the first half of the 20th century, the towns on the southern coast of Massachusetts had the highest concentration of dairy farms in the entire state. While most of the fertile pasture land has long since been cut up by interstate highways and housing developments, a number of iconic and unusually shaped buildings remain standing from that time, serving as a reminder of when family-owned dairies dotted the then-rural landscape.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

Powerhouse Project Re-energizes Beloit College Campus

Posted on: June 4th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: Robin Zebrowski, Flickr
Beloit College, founded in 1846 by Yale University alumnus Aaron Lucius Chapin, is the oldest continuously operated college in Wisconsin.

We Beloiters -- students and alumni of Beloit College in Beloit, Wisc. --  love history. It’s inescapable. From the Pearsons Hall student center designed by Daniel Burnham -- architect of the Flatiron Building in New York, Union Station in Washington, D.C., and much of the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair -- to Wisconsin Historical Landmark Middle College, our rich heritage is as much a part of our identity as our campus-wide love of New Glarus beer and Ultimate Frisbee.

That’s why a new adaptive reuse project at Beloit, which proposes to convert an early-1900s power generating station on the adjacent Rock River into a state-of-the-art campus center, is receiving so much enthusiasm from students, alumni, and community members.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Instagram Tour] Behind the Scenes at Union Station

Posted on: June 3rd, 2014 by Grant Stevens 4 Comments

 

Credit: brilliantartistry, Instagram
The top of the main hall | Fun Fact: Saint Gaudens designed these statues without shields. The railroad owners felt that the bare-legged statues might offend the ladies. As a way to get back at the resistance, the sculptor decided to give the statues a little extra. There are some interesting surprises behind some of these shields. -- @brilliantartistry, Jarrett Hendrix

While waiting in the Washington, D.C., Union Station Main Hall, many visitors look up to admire the beautiful barrel-vaulted ceilings currently undergoing restoration or the statues of Roman legionnaires that look down from stories above. Rarely, however, do you see people looking back at you.

Saturday, May 31 was an exception. In partnership with the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation (USRC), the National Trust led four behind-the-scenes tours of Union Station, taking photographers and Instagrammers to spaces rarely open to the public.

We’ve compiled some of our favorite photos from the day, as well as information about each of the stops. You can find more photos on Instagram or Twitter by searching #unionstationtour. Be sure to follow @SavingPlaces too!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

Preserving an Iconic Landmark in Business History: Madam C. J. Walker’s Villa Lewaro

Posted on: June 2nd, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 3 Comments

 

Written by Brent Leggs, Senior Field Officer

Credit: ToddShepera/National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Treasure reception in Irvington, N.Y., May 2014

In Irvington, N.Y., there stands Madam C. J. Walker’s “Villa Lewaro,” a restored, elegant historic residence that embodies the optimism and perseverance of American entrepreneurship. This newly designated National Treasure reveals Madam Walker’s unparalleled accomplishments in the face of a 20th-century segregated America and at a time before women had the right to vote. With the rising success of Oprah Winfrey, Ursula Burns, Queen Latifah, Tyra Banks, Indra Nooyi, Mary Barra, and other businesswomen, it’s important that we preserve the past to enrich the future.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[PHOTOS] Lost Relics of the 1964-65 World’s Fair

Posted on: May 30th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: Bill Cotter
The Eastman Kodak pavilion during the demolition process in the years following the 1964-65 World's Fair in Queens, N.Y.

What happens to a building that is no longer standing?

Sure, we know that the physical space that the structure once occupied is cleared, and that the debris gets carted away. But how do we remember a built space that we can no longer access, or that no longer exists? For many visitors at the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, N.Y., their memories only live on through souvenirs, photographs, and stories. Almost all of the fair’s roughly 150 pavilions are gone.

Below, we highlight popular 1964-65 World’s Fair sites that were either moved or demolished, or both.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.