Historic Real Estate: Humble Beginnings Edition

Posted on: April 13th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The house at 2 Swifts Alley was originally a tobacco warehouse.

2 Swifts Alley -- Alexandria, Virginia

The house at 2 Swifts Alley was originally built in 1780 as a tobacco warehouse. Some 160 years later, the Waggaman brothers acquired it. Though the warehouse was in a dilapidated condition, the brothers saw it through an extensive renovation into a residential dwelling. They added the current stucco-like material to the exterior to protect the brick mortar from the humid Virginia summer weather. One of the Waggaman brothers, who was a clerk for the United States Supreme Court, placed two plaster medallions from the first Supreme Court chamber above the living room and library fireplaces.

Today the four-bedroom house proudly displays its tobacco warehouse origins through the exposed 200-year-old wooden beams, open staircases with pipe railings, and tobacco-flower detail wood on the door frame at the original loading dock. The modern amenities are plentiful as well. There is a glass gazebo-style addition which holds a kitchen and breakfast room. The house also features a spacious family room with vaulted ceilings and French doors. Price: $3,350,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament Championship Recap

Posted on: April 10th, 2015 by David Weible 5 Comments

 

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The Corner Club in Moscow, Idaho is the first-ever champion of The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament.

Last call is over and it’s finally closing time for The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament 2015, but there’s one drinkery still dancing victoriously atop the bar.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Introducing the Panama Hotel, A Bittersweet Symbol of Hope

Posted on: April 9th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 3 Comments

 

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The Panama Hotel in Seattle has been named the newest National Treasure.

How do you pack a lifetime into two suitcases?

In the weeks following the Pearl Harbor attack in December 1941, Japanese-Americans were confronted with that very question, forced to decide what warranted inclusion as they prepared to go to an undisclosed location for an undetermined amount of time. The story of what they left behind is integral to the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s newest National Treasure, the Panama Hotel in Seattle, which served as a repository for the trunks, suitcases, and boxes that couldn’t be brought along.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

Written by Sarah Fitts, Atlanta Movie Tours

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The Castleberry Hill neighborhood has been featured in films such as "Driving Miss Daisy," "Sweet Home Alabama," and "Ride Along."

Recently, Atlanta, Georgia, has become known as "The Hollywood of the South." Right now, over 35 television shows and movies are filming in and around the city. And although Atlanta’s movie business is just beginning to boom, there are several places in the city and in surrounding areas that have been saved from -- or face the threat of -- demolition.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Saving Places with a Twist: Preservation-Themed Booze

Posted on: April 8th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 4 Comments

 

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The Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails (LUPEC) meet once a month to socialize, network, and have a good cocktail.

If you’ve been following the hype around The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament, you can understand how preservation and alcohol can combine to make an intoxicating mix. As the Big Tap rounds up this week (have you voted for the champion yet?), we’d like to highlight some fascinating groups with preservation ties to one of our favorite vices.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

By Boyce Thompson

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Rancho Joaquina was designed by renowned Phoenix architects Lee Fitzhugh and Lester Byron in the Spanish Colonial Revival style.

Marc and Karen Goldblatt were ready to unwind after a hectic week hosting events at Rancho Joaquina, the ninety-year-old historic home they own in Phoenix.

First, the Goldblatts hosted a dinner lecture about the national political scene. Later in the week, they opened their landmark Spanish Colonial Revival home to the Arizona Historical League, which put on a catered event with food, presentations, and an informal house tour for more than 150 guests.

Now, relaxing over Saturday morning coffee, the couple was happy to relate details of their 26-year restoration odyssey, much of it guided by framed reproductions of the home’s original blueprints hanging in the pantry.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.