Weekend Reads from Time, Solar City, Smithsonian, and More

Posted on: July 31st, 2015 by Sarah Heffern No Comments

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Archaeological work in process at Jamestown.
Archaeological work in process at Jamestown

"Jamestown’s original fort is perhaps the most archaeologically fertile acre in the United States. In 1994, Bill Kelso, a former head archaeologist at Monticello, put his shovel in the clay soil here and began unearthing the first of two million artifacts from the early days of the settlement. ... One firecracker revelation after another is now filling in the history of the first successful English colony in America." Smithsonian Magazine - New Jamestown Discovery Reveals the Identities of Four Prominent Settlers

"'Many people don’t realize that the ‘Deep Throat’ garage—where Mark Felt met with Woodward and Bernstein—is still a working parking garage in Arlington’s Rosslyn neighborhood,' says Andrew Terranova, concierge at Philadelphia’s Hotel Monaco, and the guide for the nearby Spirits of ’76 Ghost Tour. 'A historic marker has been placed outside.

'" Time - These Are America’s Best Cities for Historic Sites... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

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3798 Government Blvd.

Mysterious Midcentury Modern House Seeks Eccentric Owner

3798 Government Blvd. -- Mobile, Alabama

I’ve got a secret. I’m rumored to be a “collectable” house designed by the one and only architect Robert Byrd. But I’m not letting on as to whether I really am or not. What I will tell you is that I was built around 1958, that I echo many of Byrd's revered design elements, and that I’m not a home for the traditional historic house shopper.

For those of you who appreciate octagon-shaped rooms, cross-hatched glass windows, and original peg and plank wood flooring adorned with exposed stone and brick throughout, I’m the home for you. I’ve also got an upgraded, state-of-the-art master bedroom and kitchen waiting for your personal touch.

Ready for the mysterious to meet the unusual? Look me up here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Our Historic Bars series is in a fresh round of old and historic watering holes around the country, but we here at PreservationNation found ourselves getting a bit nostalgic for the favorite bars of yesteryear. Indulge us for a moment, and come along for a stroll (or stagger) down Memory Lane as we revisit the five most popular bar features from the past year.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

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Tom Hendrix has spent the last 30 years building this mile-long monument to his great-great grandmother.

Some retirees take up fly-fishing or gardening. After retiring from a Ford Motor Company aluminum plant in Sheffield, Alabama, in 1983, Tom Hendrix started building a stone wall with his bare hands.

Even though it’s still a work in progress, the Wichahpi Commemorative Stone Wall is currently the largest unmortared wall in the United States, built to memorialize Hendrix’s Native American great-great grandmother, Te-lah-nay. The wall represents Te-lah-nay’s journey back to her homeland after being relocated to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears following the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Missing the “singing” Tennessee River she had grown up next to in present-day Florence, Alabama, she spent five years retracing her steps, eventually making her way back to her Yuchi tribe’s native land.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Fall Asleep in Class at Portland, Oregon’s Kennedy School

Posted on: July 29th, 2015 by Lauren Walser No Comments

 

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Kennedy School in northeast Portland, Oregon, was built in 1915.

Go ahead -- drink a beer or take a nap at northeast Portland, Oregon’s Kennedy Elementary School. We promise you won’t get detention.

Since its doors re-opened in 1997, Kennedy School, as it’s now called, has traded in reading, writing, and arithmetic for something a little different, thanks to its new owners, McMenamins. The popular Portland-based chain worked its magic on the long-vacant school, turning it into a combination hotel, restaurant, bar, brewery, theater, music venue, community garden, and community gathering space.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Pergola

Posted on: July 29th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

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A lemon pergola in the garden of historic Lotusland

Sometimes in preservation, the larger structures -- main buildings, outbuildings, and extensive landscapes -- can catch and hold our attention. But it is also worthwhile to take a look at the smaller, more obscure structures and their contribution to the history of the house and larger landscape. For example, if the historic site you love has a garden, take a look at the often overlooked pergola.

You may be wondering, what is a pergola? According to the Trust for Architectural Easements’ Glossary of Architectural Terms, a pergola is defined as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.