[Historic Bars] The Warren Tavern in Charlestown, Massachusetts

Posted on: November 26th, 2014 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: The Warren Tavern in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

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The Warren Tavern first opened its doors in 1780, five years after the Battle of Bunker Hill left Charlestown in ruins. 

The Warren Tavern’s charming address of 2 Pleasant Street in Charlestown belies its origin as a Revolutionary War haunt frequented by Paul Revere and George Washington. Established in 1780, the Tavern was one of the first buildings erected in Charlestown after the bloody Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, when British forces left the town in ruins. Among the colonial casualties was the tavern’s namesake, Dr. Joseph Warren, a physician and general who played an integral role in the American Revolution.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

Written by Tina Connor, Executive Vice President, Indiana Landmarks

A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley Peters.
A c. 1935 photo shows Wright’s influence in the design of Peters-Margedant House by William Wesley (Wes) Peters.

Most people know of Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous and influential American architect. Wes Peters (1921-1991), his right-hand man? Not so much.

Wright’s first Taliesin apprentice in 1932, Peters took a two-year break from the architect and returned to his hometown of Evansville, Indiana, from mid-1933 to 1935. Love caused the flight: Peters fell in love with Wright’s stepdaughter Svetlana, then a teenager, and her parents mightily disapproved.

Two years later, the Wrights relented. Peters and Svetlana married and returned to Taliesin, where Peters remained for the rest of his life, becoming chief architect after the master’s death in 1959 and retaining the title until his own death in 1991.

Though he would never claim credit as first, the humble apprentice designed the Usonian-style Peters-Margedant House in Evansville in 1935, two years before Frank Lloyd Wright’s first Usonian appeared in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1937. The Evansville house shows that Peters internalized Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture and his thoughts on creating affordable homes. Art historian Richard Guy Wilson believes the tiny house possesses national significance.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

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Guests can dine beneath cathedral ceilings at the former First Baptist Church -- now Terrapin Restaurant -- in Rhinebeck, New York

In the Fall 2014 issue of Preservation we brought you our first roundup of churches-turned-restaurants, following it up shortly thereafter with a blog post featuring even more heavenly cuisine. In case your prayers still weren't answered, here are three brand-new selections sure to please the palates of even the most devout food-lovers.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Historic Real Estate: Victorian Edition

Posted on: November 21st, 2014 by Geoff Montes No Comments

 

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This restored 1897 Victorian home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Serendipity Acres Sugar Grove, North Carolina

Nestled in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, this three-acre property is adjacent to Pisgah National Forest, making it ideal for a family that enjoys outdoor activities such as camping, hiking, fishing, or rock climbing. The elegant Victorian home was built in 1897 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Spread across 3,000 square feet, the home contains 5 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. Previous owners retained the original wood floor on the main level, which consists of a parlor, formal dining room, den, kitchen, and “keeping room” with four gas fireplaces; the four bedrooms on the second level also have their own fireplaces. The fifth bedroom is located in the finished attic and boasts impressive views of the surrounding valley. Two gazebos, two attached livestock sheds, and a creek round out the property. Price: $549,000... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

[Historic Bars] Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Did George Washington really sleep here? In our next round of Historic Bars, we're stopping at the crossroads of time and history to explore old taverns and inns around the country -- the kind with wooden signs, rooms for lodging, and a century (or two) of fascinating stories. Next in line: Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop Bar in New Orleans.

Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.
Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar is estimated to have been built between 1722 and 1732.

A powerful purple “voodoo” drink and a healthy dose of pirate history are just two great reasons to visit Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar, located on New Orleans’ storied Bourbon Street.

Hailed as possibly the oldest bar in the United States and most definitely the oldest building currently in use as a bar, Lafitte’s is housed in a French-built structure that dates from roughly 1722 -- the details, like so much of New Orleans lore, are sketchy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.