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There are alternatives to Dominion's current plan to construct high-voltage transmission lines across the James River.

Despite the fact that it would destroy the public’s enjoyment of a beautiful stretch of river, ruin the historic context of irreplaceable historic assets like Jamestown and Colonial Parkway, and mar a landscape that’s been largely unchanged for thousands of years, Dominion Virginia Power still wants to construct high-voltage transmission lines across the James River.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. There are alternatives.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

African-Americans often fished the banks of the James for shad, a local fish that they consumed or sold for profit.
African-Americans often fished the banks of the James for shad, a local fish that they consumed or sold for profit.

Since the first Africans arrived at Jamestown in the 17th century, the African-American connection to the James River has been both cultural and economic. From the earliest days of the slave trade, through the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, and well into the 20th century, the river has been used for transport, food, financial opportunity, and more.

In this installment of the "On the River" video series, public historian Russell B. Hopson talks about the African-American experience along the winding James, deepening our sense of the heritage that will suffer if Dominion Virginia Power goes through with its proposed power line plan.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Weekend Reads from OregonLive, The Kansas City Star, and More

Posted on: May 22nd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

By Tim Mikulski

Welcome to a recently added feature here at the PreservationNation blog: Weekend Reads, wherein we'll be sharing a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

Wide sidewalks and historic commercial buildings on Main Street in Louisville, Kentucky.
Wide sidewalks and historic commercial buildings on Main Street in Louisville, Kentucky.

“It’s National Preservation Month once again, and here in Louisville, it’s all too often the case that preservationists find themselves at odds with various development and business interests who quickly dismiss such heritage endeavors as bad for the bottom line. Luckily, we know that preservation and business go hand in hand, and so do a growing number of local entrepreneurs. Take Tim Koons-McGee, for example, the owner of local ice cream parlor The Comfy Cow.” – Broken Sidewalk: Comfy Cow Owner Tim Koons-McGee Talks Historic Preservation and Why It’s Good for His Business

“Preservationists say some 1,700 historic properties across six Portland neighborhoods – and countless others throughout Oregon – may not be protected from demolition without help from the Oregon Supreme Court. Worries are mounting because of a recent Court of Appeals decision involving a historic property in Lake Oswego. Under the ruling, a property owner can overturn regulations to preserve buildings designated as historic if the designation was imposed by a local government.” – OregonLive: Oregon Supreme Court Case May Alter Landscape of Historic Preservation

“The father-son team has been restoring historic homes together for several years, first in Liberty and now in Kansas City, where some 7,000 vacant buildings have been a citywide concern for years. Thanks to these two, there is now one fewer to worry about. ‘We knew the house was in bad shape. What we didn’t know was that the city was targeting it. Within a week after we bought it, we were getting threatening letters from the city saying something needed to be done here,’ Ken says. ‘We don’t blame them. Something did need to be done.’” – The Kansas City Star: Father-Son Restorers Turn Ugly Homes Into Historic Gems

“A project has been launched in California to focus on the state's LGBT history as work advances on a National Historic Landmark LGBTQ Theme Study and proposed framework for the National Park Service. Called California Pride: Mapping LGBTQ Histories, the online, crowdsourced archive will feature, according to organizers, the ‘memories, stories, and images related to sites throughout the Golden State associated with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer experience.’” – The Bay Area Reporter: CA LGBT History Project Launches

“The [North Carolina] budget inserts the historic preservation tax credit of House Bill 152, which passed the House in March but has languished in the Senate’s Ways and Means Committee, which rarely meets. The recommendation is for a 15 percent tax credit for qualified expenditures up to $10 million, a 10 percent tax credit for qualified expenditures between $10 million and $20 million, and a small credit for structures that don’t produce income...The historic preservation tax credits have been instrumental in several revitalization projects in downtown Winston-Salem, with a combined capital investment value of more than $700 million.” – Winston-Salem Journal: Plan Would Restore Historic Preservation, Medical Expense Exemptions

"Pictures of the architectural splendours of Palmyra make it plain how desperately this place needs to be preserved. And if anyone thinks there’s a difference between saving stone and saving people, look on the faces of the ancient Palmyrans. The past is not a remote place. It is the mirror of ourselves. To cherish history and art is to care about the future." – The Guardian: Palmyra: is saving priceless antiquity as important as saving people?

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Today we continue our installment of Historic Real Estate called “Preservation Personals,” where we let the historic properties speak for themselves. Today's personal is ...

150521_blog-photo_sophisticated-and-stylish-town-home
325 S. Pitt St.

Stylish and Sophisticated Historic Townhome Seeks Chic Owner Looking for a Good Time

325 S. Pitt St. -- Alexandria, Virginia

Historic house hunting is like a box of chocolates -- you never know what you’re going to get. Sometimes that’s good, sometimes that’s bad, but in my case you’ve definitely stumbled across a gem like now other!

I have a signature late 19th-century elegance complimented by a chic modern touch. My elaborate high ceilings, dappled by crystal-like chandeliers throughout, are reminiscent of lighthearted Gilded Age parties.

If you’d like to host a stylish party of your own, I have a full gourmet kitchen complete with marble counter tops and top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances capable of making every event a success. After the party, put your feet up in any of my three bedrooms, or steal away into the garden enclave in the backyard and let the crickets serenade you with a midnight melody.

Sound like a treasure you can’t resist? Don’t let me get away! Check me out here.

Curious about buying a historic property, but not sure where to start? Read our toolkit series The Buyer’s Guide to Historic Homes and The ‘New Old House Starter Kit’ for Older and Historic Homes.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Colonial Parkway offers a variety of stunning vistas of the James, from marshy inland waterways to vast expanses of open river.

For local residents and international visitors alike, the Colonial Parkway is an important part of experiencing the beauty and the history of the James River.

The 23-mile scenic roadway, administered by the National Park Service, connects Yorktown, Williamsburg, and Jamestown, three of Virginia’s most important historic sites. The roadway was designed to fit into the landscape, unobtrusively snaking its way from site to site through forest, marshland, and along the scenic James River.

But of all the historic and cultural sites along the river, Colonial Parkway may be affected the most by Dominion’s plan to construct high-voltage transmission lines. Its grandest view of the river -- one that has gone largely unchanged since even before Captain John Smith first sailed its waters in 1607 -- would be ruined by the construction of Dominion’s transmission lines, effectively destroying the cultural heritage that generations have fought to create and protect.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series has guided you through the wilderness of managing your personal expectations during a preservation project, understanding the difference between federal, state, and local preservation groups, and fundraising basics. Today, we’re going to help you navigate through the tricky thicket of historic designations.

For professional preservationists, historic designations are among the primary go-to factors to consider when trying to save a historic site or property. However, for people who don’t spend their days steeped in historic preservation, it’s not always easy to determine what separates a national landmark from a local one -- not to mention all the stops in between.

These tips will help you better understand the difference between federal, state, and local designations, their benefits, and their application processes.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.