[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Chamfer

Posted on: April 17th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

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Example of a lamb's tongue chamfer carved in wood.

Are you a preservation word nerd? Do you seek out wild, obscure, fun-to-say-aloud terms and phrases, the kind that only place-lovers would thrill to? If so, you're in luck -- we're starting a new segment on PreservationNation called Preservation Glossary, designed to define a bite-sized word for you each week to satisfy your craving for preservation vocabulary. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

By Tyler Anthony Smith

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The "Two Sisters" houses were home to African-American ship caulkers between 1842-1854.

Have you ever noticed two small, 218-year-old, wood-sided houses on South Wolfe Street in Baltimore’s Fell’s Point? The Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fell’s Point owns these buildings, often referred to as the “Two Sisters,” which likely date to 1797 -- the same year that the U.S. Frigate Constellation was built in a Fell’s Point ship yard.

Originally part of a building with four identical units, the remaining "Two Sisters" each stand just twelve feet wide and fifteen feet deep, with a single room on the first floor and a half story garret above. The buildings housed many working Baltimore residents, including African-American ship caulkers Richard Jones, Henry Scott, and John Whittington from 1842 to 1854. As ship caulkers they are associated with a unique Baltimore story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

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The Down to the Wire campaign van in front of Dominion Power's office building in Richmond.

Last week, the Down to the Wire team hit the road and made its first big stop in Richmond -- right in Dominion Power’s front yard. Our message was loud and clear: Find an alternative to putting high-voltage power lines across the beautiful, historic James River at Jamestown. And the people of Richmond turned out to let us know they agree.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

It’s Time to Tell the Whole Story

Posted on: April 14th, 2015 by Stephanie Meeks

 

Two weeks ago, I had the privilege of speaking at the Martin Luther King Jr. Center in Atlanta about the critical importance of our diversity outreach efforts at the National Trust. The op-ed below, which appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution this past Saturday, explains why we are working so hard on this, and how you can get involved. If you know of an overlooked place that matters, please tell us in the comments!

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Stephanie K. Meeks speaks at the Martin Luther King Jr. Center about the importance of diversity outreach efforts in preservation.

“Before the Pilgrim fathers landed at Plymouth, we were here. Before Jefferson etched across the pages of history the majestic words of the Declaration of Independence, we were here. Before the beautiful words of the Star Spangled Banner were written, we were here.” So said Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in his last-ever Sunday sermon, 47 years ago. He’s right. For too long, our history wasn’t told in a way that embraced the contributions and struggles of black Americans. Nor did the places we preserve reflect the true diversity of our common American story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

 

Written by Sophia Dembling

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Kate Clifford Larson is the author of Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero.

Kate Clifford Larson, Ph.D., was intrigued by Harriet Tubman when her daughter studied the famous abolitionist in elementary school. But when she looked for a biography of Tubman written for adults, the most recent one Larson could find was from the 1940s.

Thus began her career as a Tubman scholar.

Larson's book Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero came out in 2003, and she has since become a go-to scholar, consulting with Eastern seaboard states developing Harriet Tubman sites and, recently, with HBO about a miniseries co-produced with and starring Viola Davis.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Celebrating National Library Week 2015, Preservation-Style

Posted on: April 13th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

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National Library Week is April 12-18, 2015.

In honor of National Library Week (which runs from April 12-18 and is sponsored by the American Library Association), the National Trust is using a preservation perspective to spotlight three historic buildings that have been repurposed into a bookworm’s paradise. These three libraries are an excellent example of National Library Week 2015's theme: "unlimited possibilities." So, prepare yourselves, bibliophiles, for an impromptu road trip!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.