Videos

44 Years Ago, DC's 14th Street NW Burned

Posted on: April 6th, 2012 by David Garber 5 Comments

 

44 years ago this week, in April 1968, a number of DC's major commercial corridors were under siege by rioters following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. From Wikipedia:

"As word of King's murder in Memphis, Tennessee spread on the evening of Thursday, April 4, crowds began to gather at 14th and U. Stokely Carmichael, the Trinidad and Tobago-born activist and Howard University graduate, [...] led members of the [Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee] to stores in the neighborhood demanding that they close out of respect. Although polite at first, the crowd fell out of control and began breaking windows. By 11pm, widespread looting had begun, as well as in over 30 other cities."

Check out the video below of DC's 14th Street NW -- out of control and burning -- filmed during the riots:

But don't stop there. 14th Street NW (home to our Restoration Diary building), as well as many of the other corridors affected during the riots, are well on their way to becoming healthy and vibrant places to be. Here's a slideshow of what 14th just south of U Street looks like now.

 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Video] A Former Green Mountain Lookout Tells His Story

Posted on: April 3rd, 2012 by David Garber 1 Comment

 

Yesterday we published a post about a recent legal case involving the old Green Mountain lookout building - a little shack from the 1930s on a remote mountaintop in Washington State’s Glacier Peak Wilderness. Although the pictures in the post were pretty, and the story - although about a preservation loss - pretty clear, I wanted to post this video, created by High Country News, that gives a firsthand account of what it was like to be a fire lookout on top of Green Mountain.

What do you think - should places like this, in areas designated for wilderness, be preserved as traces of human imprint on and interaction with the land?

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Pop-Ups Bring New Life to Old Oakland, CA

Posted on: March 22nd, 2012 by David Garber 2 Comments

 

Pop-ups are part of the latest wave of grassroots urban innovations hitting cities now (see also: parks on railroads, cultural centers in old houses, and a thousand other cool things across the country). They are a creative way to bring - on a temporary basis, at least to begin with - energy and economy to otherwise vacant space, be it an empty building on Main Street or a windswept lot nobody's building on anytime soon.


In their pop-up location in Old Oakland, Manifesto Bicycles owners Sam Cunningham and MacKay Gibbs highlight their selection of customizable bikes. (Top left photo: Eva Kolenko. Others: popuphood)

There are any number of kinds of pop-ups, but the most common are retail and event pop-ups. Retailers can lease or be granted space to see if their concept has real legs, or people can host things like parties or even bike-powered movie nights in spaces that sit empty every other night of the week. For retailers, if the concept is successful, a longer lease can then be signed.


Owners Nicole Buffett and Jake Bagshaw, both San Francisco native artists inside their'DIY California lifestyle' boutique Piper and John General Goods. (Photo: Eva Kolenko)

In the Old Oakland neighborhood of Oakland, California, a group called popuphood is leading the charge on pop-up retail space. Old Oakland is a charming tree lined historic district with brick sidewalks, Victorian architecture evoking its past as the original heart of the city of Oakland. But although there's been a fair amount of restaurant and residential construction and conversions in the area, Old Oakland still lacks retail volume. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Video] Investigating Original Paint Colors

Posted on: March 13th, 2012 by David Garber

 

"All buildings have secrets to reveal, it seems. [...] Whether you're investigating paint or doing conservation testing, the idea is to try to understand what things are made out of, what the pathologies are, the layers sequence - and they can reveal quite a bit of information. It's about the relationship of all these finishes one to another, and their history: history of deterioration, history of change." - Jeff Greene

It's hard to be a preservationist and not hear the words "original paint colors" at least once every couple months. But while the concept itself may be easy to understand, the process of identifying those colors and finishes is much more involved (think scalpels and microscopes).

Check out this great video produced by EverGreene Architectural Arts on the practice of original finish investigation:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Video] Reimagining Downtown Dallas' Pedestrian Tunnels

Posted on: March 5th, 2012 by David Garber 4 Comments

 

"Do I think that the tunnels and one way streets were a bad idea? Yes, I do. I think it was a terrible, disastrous idea for a city that needs to maintain a vibrant downtown." -Jack Gosnell, Dallas real estate broker

Here's a great video from You + Dallas on downtown Dallas' pedestrian tunnel system. When they were built in the 1960s, they were heralded as new, streamlined, climate-controlled retail corridors. Problem was, they pretty much killed the streets above them.

As the city of Dallas' new Downtown Dallas 360 plan is implemented, the city's tunnels and sky bridges may close to bring people back to the sidewalks. Is there a role for these places as the city evolves?

David Garber is the blog editor at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.