Videos

Pop-Ups Bring New Life to Old Oakland, CA

Posted on: March 22nd, 2012 by David Garber 2 Comments

 

Pop-ups are part of the latest wave of grassroots urban innovations hitting cities now (see also: parks on railroads, cultural centers in old houses, and a thousand other cool things across the country). They are a creative way to bring - on a temporary basis, at least to begin with - energy and economy to otherwise vacant space, be it an empty building on Main Street or a windswept lot nobody's building on anytime soon.


In their pop-up location in Old Oakland, Manifesto Bicycles owners Sam Cunningham and MacKay Gibbs highlight their selection of customizable bikes. (Top left photo: Eva Kolenko. Others: popuphood)

There are any number of kinds of pop-ups, but the most common are retail and event pop-ups. Retailers can lease or be granted space to see if their concept has real legs, or people can host things like parties or even bike-powered movie nights in spaces that sit empty every other night of the week. For retailers, if the concept is successful, a longer lease can then be signed.


Owners Nicole Buffett and Jake Bagshaw, both San Francisco native artists inside their'DIY California lifestyle' boutique Piper and John General Goods. (Photo: Eva Kolenko)

In the Old Oakland neighborhood of Oakland, California, a group called popuphood is leading the charge on pop-up retail space. Old Oakland is a charming tree lined historic district with brick sidewalks, Victorian architecture evoking its past as the original heart of the city of Oakland. But although there's been a fair amount of restaurant and residential construction and conversions in the area, Old Oakland still lacks retail volume. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Video] Investigating Original Paint Colors

Posted on: March 13th, 2012 by David Garber

 

"All buildings have secrets to reveal, it seems. [...] Whether you're investigating paint or doing conservation testing, the idea is to try to understand what things are made out of, what the pathologies are, the layers sequence - and they can reveal quite a bit of information. It's about the relationship of all these finishes one to another, and their history: history of deterioration, history of change." - Jeff Greene

It's hard to be a preservationist and not hear the words "original paint colors" at least once every couple months. But while the concept itself may be easy to understand, the process of identifying those colors and finishes is much more involved (think scalpels and microscopes).

Check out this great video produced by EverGreene Architectural Arts on the practice of original finish investigation:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Video] Reimagining Downtown Dallas' Pedestrian Tunnels

Posted on: March 5th, 2012 by David Garber 4 Comments

 

"Do I think that the tunnels and one way streets were a bad idea? Yes, I do. I think it was a terrible, disastrous idea for a city that needs to maintain a vibrant downtown." -Jack Gosnell, Dallas real estate broker

Here's a great video from You + Dallas on downtown Dallas' pedestrian tunnel system. When they were built in the 1960s, they were heralded as new, streamlined, climate-controlled retail corridors. Problem was, they pretty much killed the streets above them.

As the city of Dallas' new Downtown Dallas 360 plan is implemented, the city's tunnels and sky bridges may close to bring people back to the sidewalks. Is there a role for these places as the city evolves?

David Garber is the blog editor at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[VIDEO] De/Re-Constructing an Historic Metal Facade

Posted on: January 30th, 2012 by David Garber

 

Working with old and historic buildings is often a lesson in patience. So when I came across this time-lapse video of the old Opera House in Stewardson, Illinois, having its galvanized iron facade carefully removed, it was refreshing to imagine it all happening in a matter of seconds.

As background, the old opera house was slated for demolition by the Village of Stewardson - who agreed to allow its Mesker Brothers galvanized iron facade to be salvaged for reuse on a fire-damaged main street building in neighboring Arcola, Illinois. See the completed building below:

Stewardson Opera Hall facade in Arcola, IL
The restored and relocated facade in Arcola, Illinois. (Photo: Darius Bryjka)

Check out the Mesker Brothers blog for more about the building and the type of facade seen in the video.

David Garber is the blog editor at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Preservation Round-Up: "Vinyl Windows Are Maintenance Free" (Not) Edition

Posted on: December 12th, 2011 by David Garber

 

"Wouldn't it be more accurate to say that they can't be maintained?" Check out this great video about the importance of restoring old windows rather than replacing them and more in today's Preservation Round-Up:


(Hat tip to Heritage Ohio and Preservation Saginaw for posting this to Facebook!)

Preservation Grammar: Historic v. Historical - Preservation in Pink

"How often do you come across "historical preservation" as opposed to "historic preservation?" I see this quite often, whether casually or in presentations. If you consider the laws and the basis for the field, the proper term is "historic" not "historical.""

The demise of the Metropolitan Building sparked the Twin Cities' preservation movement - StarTribune

Designed by Daniel Burnham, Detroit's David Whitney Building is being renovated as a boutique hotel. (Photo: Flickr user KrHn313)

[Click through for video] "It has been 50 years - Dec. 19, 1961, to be exact - since the wreckers took their first swing at the fabled Metropolitan Building, but the wounds to the city's psyche and skyline still seem fresh. If only we could travel back in time 121 years, to 1890, when 8,000 people, including the upper reaches of Minneapolis society, gathered to celebrate the opening of what was originally called the Northwestern Guaranty Loan Building."

Boutique hotel signs on for Detroit's David Whitney Building redevelopment - mLive.com

"The building, designed by famed Chicago-architect Daniel Burnham and named after local lumber baron David Whitney Jr., first openend in 1915 but has been vacant for more than a decade. "Aloft is particularly well-suited for adaptive reuse because of its urban aesthetic,” Brian McGuinness, Senior Vice President of Specialty Select Brands for Starwood, said in a released statement. “"Preserving this integral part of Detroit’s history is a priority for us as well, an it’s exciting to meld Aloft’s design sensibility with this spectacular original structure.""

David Garber is the blog editor at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.