Videos

 

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More than a century after its construction, Seattle's single-room-occupancy Panama Hotel continues to evoke the lifestyle and culture of Japanese-Americans during the early part of the 20th century. Its current owner, Jan Johnson, has preserved the building, along with its Japanese-style bath house and collection of belongings stored by Japanese-Americans incarcerated during World War II.

A National Treasure of the National Trust, the Panama Hotel, has many stories to tell, and producers Laine Ross and David Vice of Seattle's Big Story Group have set out to capture as many of them as they can. Through their Panama Hotel Legacy Film project, the duo hope to honor the history of the hotel, its occupants, and its owner as the property looks for new ownership and continued preservation.

We spoke with Ross and Vice for their take on the project, the hotel, and the importance of preserving our shared history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register Guide.

Episode Three of our National Register of Historic Places Guide addressed questions and debunked myths about any requirements or restrictions the National Register imposes on listed properties.

Episode Four explains some of the less tangible reasons why listing a property on the National Register is important, and how listing a property can affect a community’s perception of itself.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Video] A Project of Stewardship in Savannah

Posted on: July 14th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

By Elizabeth Byrd Wood, Senior Content Manager, Preservation Leadership Forum

150715_blog-photo_Giselle-Rahn
Giselle Rahn and her fiancé Matt in front of the Savannah house they are rehabbing.

Most stories about renovating an old house have to do with crumbling plaster and rotting sills. But when Giselle Rahn and her boyfriend took on the restoration of a 110-year-old house in Savannah, they soon recognized that they also faced complex issues involving social and economic status and racial disparity.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register Guide.

Episode Two of our National Register of Historic Places Guide focused on the function of the National Register, and answered questions such as "What does being listed on the National Register mean?" and "Does listing protect a property from demolition?"

Episode Three peels back another layer of National Register myth and legend to answer questions such as:

  • Does listing in the National Register place any automatic restrictions or requirements on a property?
  • Can I paint my National Register-listed property any color I like?
  • Can I demolish my National Register-listed property?
  • Does my National Register-listed property need to meet certain requirements to qualify for a historic tax credit?
  • Can listing in the National Register trigger a local ordinance or restriction?

We hope you enjoy the show.

Special thanks to the President Woodrow Wilson House for filming accommodations.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register of Historic Places Guide.

The first episode of our National Register Guide covered the basics, like what the National Register really is, how many listings it contains, and how many new listings are added each year.

Episode Two dives just a little deeper to explore the true function of the National Register. This episode answers questions like:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Open seasonally, the Philip Johnson Glass House offers tours, special events, and related programming to the public. Visitors can join them for the 2013 season beginning May 2. Credit: diametrik, Flickr
The Glass House is best understood as a pavilion for viewing the surrounding landscape. It ushered the International Style into residential American architecture.

As preservationists, we talk a lot about the power of place -- modern places, beautiful places, places of conscience, and sacred places. Sometimes these places are centered on a single structure -- a building where someone lived, worked, played, or died.

But there is one more way in which places can be powerful: context. It is by walking around and through these buildings that visitors are taken back in time. And in sharing that space, that context, visitors are linked with those who came before.

Early this summer we asked staff from the National Trust’s Historic Sites to tell us about their favorite objects. For some it was a specific item or a piece of art, but for three of our Historic Sites, the Glass House, Brucemore, and Touro Synagogue, the power of the place was front and center.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.