Videos

 

Global Tree Project. Credit: Shinji Turner-Yamamoto

When Osaka-born artist Shinji Turner-Yamamoto stepped into the abandoned 1895 Holy Cross Church in Cincinnati, he got goose bumps. He knew that it was there, among the crumbling plaster and peeling paint, that he would create his next art installation.

“Hanging Garden,” as seen in the slideshow below, is one of 11 site-specific art installations that make up Turner-Yamamoto’s Global Tree Project. Other installations have been created at the Sutra Hall of the 8th-century Kiyomizu Temple, a garden in New Delhi, the Mongolian Gobi Desert, and a ruined folly on a cliff overlooking the Celtic Sea.

While he seeks to forge connections between his viewers and the natural world, in the case of “Hanging Garden,” he also created a striking connection with a historic building. We talked with Turner-Yamamoto, who now splits his time between Cincinnati and Washington, D.C., to find out why he was drawn to the church, what he hopes to inspire in viewers, and why he considers it important to save historic places.

(Please note that no trees were harmed or killed in the installation of this work.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Help Us #PreserveDMV with Partners in Preservation

Posted on: April 24th, 2013 by Sarah Heffern

 

Believe it or not, it's been seven years since we first launched our partnership with American Express, Partners in Preservation. Since that time, the program has made grants worth $9 million to historic places in San Francisco, Chicago, New Orleans, Boston, Seattle, Saint Paul/Minneapolis, and New York. And as a longtime resident of the District of Columbia, I could not be more excited to announce that the D.C. metro area has been selected as 2013's host city.

Today through May 10, two dozen historic places in the DMV -- as the District, Maryland, and Virginia are known in Twitter-speak -- will be competing for $1 million in grants through a popular vote campaign. How does it work? This short video explains the process:

You can vote for one site per day, every day through May 10 and earn additional points through social sharing, so visit www.partnersinpreservation.com to see the participating sites and get voting!

And if you're local to the DMV, save the date now for Open House Weekend, May 4-5, when the sites will be hosting special events and programs to share the stories of these terrific places.

To keep up with the latest news, like Partners in Preservation on Facebook or follow @PartnersinPres on Twitter.

Voting begins on April 24, 2013 at 12:01am Eastern Time and ends on May 10 at 11:59pm ET. Must be at least 13 to vote. Limit one (1) vote per person/email address per calendar day. See terms of participation for complete details.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

[Video] Central Library in St. Louis, Renewed

Posted on: January 31st, 2013 by David Robert Weible 7 Comments

 

Atrium at Central Library of the St. Louis Public Library. Credit: Jim Balogh, St. Louis Public Library
The 7-story atrium at Central Library.

The Central Library of the St. Louis Public Library is now in its 101st year, but thanks to a $68 million restoration and renovation, you’d think it was brand-new.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Honoring a Small Bus Station for its Big Contribution to Civil Rights

Posted on: December 12th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Erica Stewart, Manager, Public Affairs


National Trust Trustee Sheffield Hale speaks to the Montgomery Bus Station/Freedom Riders Museum partners. Montgomery mayor Todd Strange (fourth from right) attended the celebration.

Last week, 57 years after Rosa Parks helped ignite the Montgomery bus boycott, National Trust Trustee Dr. Sheffield Hale of the Atlanta History Center traveled to the Alabama capital to help celebrate the preservation of a modest Greyhound bus station that made history and the creation of the Freedom Rides Museum that tells its story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

A Special Message from National Trust President Stephanie Meeks

Posted on: December 6th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Thanksgiving just passed, but we at the National Trust are still in a grateful mood -- grateful for historic places, for National Treasures, and for all the people who support our movement.

Our president Stephanie Meeks says it best:

Because of you, beloved buildings, landscapes, and communities all over the country are being preserved for future generations to experience and enjoy. We have designated these places as National Treasures because of their significance, the stories they tell, and the enriching experiences they offer. We are glad to have you standing with us as we continue this important work.

In this special video message, see for yourself all the great progress we've made this year, together:

Inspired to keep the good work going in 2013? Consider making a donation to help us advance our efforts saving America’s historic places. Thank you!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.