Videos

 

Open seasonally, the Philip Johnson Glass House offers tours, special events, and related programming to the public. Visitors can join them for the 2013 season beginning May 2. Credit: diametrik, Flickr
The Glass House is best understood as a pavilion for viewing the surrounding landscape. It ushered the International Style into residential American architecture.

As preservationists, we talk a lot about the power of place -- modern places, beautiful places, places of conscience, and sacred places. Sometimes these places are centered on a single structure -- a building where someone lived, worked, played, or died.

But there is one more way in which places can be powerful: context. It is by walking around and through these buildings that visitors are taken back in time. And in sharing that space, that context, visitors are linked with those who came before.

Early this summer we asked staff from the National Trust’s Historic Sites to tell us about their favorite objects. For some it was a specific item or a piece of art, but for three of our Historic Sites, the Glass House, Brucemore, and Touro Synagogue, the power of the place was front and center.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

 

As fantastic as it is, the National Register of Historic Places can get a little confusing -- even for a seasoned pro. But fear not, because the PreservationNation blog has teamed up with Jim Gabbert, a historian with the National Park Service, to create our National Register of Historic Places Guide.

Our series will unfold over the coming weeks, and cover everything from the origins and purpose of the National Register to recommendations on where to look for help with your nomination and tips on how to amend an existing listing -- and all of this information comes to you in a new video format.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Summer Concert Series] Marian Anderson at the Lincoln Memorial

Posted on: June 29th, 2015 by Kara Timberlake 3 Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): Marian Anderson, accompanied by pianist Kosti Vehanen

Venue: Lincoln Memorial

Location: Washington, D.C.

Date: April 9, 1939 (Easter Sunday)

Memorable Moment: Then-Interior Secretary Harold Ickes introduced Anderson to the stage, saying “Genius draws no color lines, and so it is fitting that Marian Anderson should raise her voice in tribute to the noble Lincoln, whom mankind will ever honor.”

Show Vibe: More than 75,000 crowded the National Mall while millions of radio listeners tuned in to hear Anderson.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. An aficionado of coffee and music, she loves to discover hidden stories through reading, traveling, and meeting new people.

 

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The Julia Morgan-designed Chinese YWCA of San Francisco was built in 1932 and now houses the Chinese Historical Society.

Though many people know Julia Morgan as the architect of iconic Hearst Castle, she also designed buildings on more modest budgets. One of her best is the Chinese YWCA (1932) in San Francisco, now the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

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A Praxinoscope (a successor to the zoetrope) at Monterey State Historic Park (Cooper Molera).

Take a look around you. Pick up the first object you see. What is it? What can it be used for? When was it created? Does it have personal meaning to you, or is it an everyday object that serves an important function?

These are just a few of the questions historians ask of every piece of their collection. Individually these objects tell a specific segment of a story; collectively they illustrate a life. Whether the object is a sculpture or a slave brand, the answers they give links the past with the present, providing connective tissue between the visitor and the people who lived and worked at that historic site.

Where National Trust staff from our 27 historic sites recently took a look at four different pieces of art, this week we turn our attention to three-dimensional objects at Montpelier, President Lincoln’s Cottage, President Woodrow Wilson’s House, Acoma Sky City, Chesterwood, Monterey State Historic Park (Cooper Molera), Villa Finale, The Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and Drayton Hall. Where the paintings last week were objects we engaged with only through sight, the set of objects in our next video take us a step further.

Do you have a particular object you love at your favorite historic site?

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

 

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Paintings on the wall at Lyndhurst, a National Trust Historic Site in Tarrytown, New York.

When you visit a historic site what do you notice first -- the building, the artwork, or an artifact? All three of these serve as tangible links between individual lives and the past. They tell stories and breathe life into a history detailed between the cover of a book.

Objects make history real. So it's only natural that those who work in historic sites find themselves drawn to particular images, objects, and buildings that help tell the story of their place -- favorite pieces that illustrate or open gateways to the broader story at the historic site.

This past spring a group of National Trust staff members got together to talk about interpretation and education at our 27 historic sites. They not only shared with us why historic sites matter, but they also took a minute to tell us what their favorite object is and why. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.