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[Historic Bars] Duluth, Minnesota’s Tycoon Alehouse & Eatery

Posted on: January 30th, 2015 by David Robert Weible No Comments

 

What's more fun than a historic bar? A historic bar with a theme! And that's exactly what we're featuring in our next installment of historic bars -- establishments with kitschy, unusual, and unique calling cards. Next up: Duluth's Tycoon's Alehouse & Eatery.

Tycoon's Alehouse sits in the fully restored 1889 Duluth City Hall

Tycoon's Alehouse sits in the fully restored 1889 Duluth City Hall

While its collection of trout streams, mountain bike trails, and ski hills – not to mention one of the largest bodies of fresh water on the globe -- have made Duluth, Minnesota an outdoorsman’s utopia, the city of some 80,000 isn’t lacking in history either.

Take its 1889 city hall.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] The Safe House in Milwaukee

Posted on: January 23rd, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

What's more fun than a historic bar? A historic bar with a theme! And that's exactly what we're featuring in our next installment of historic bars -- establishments with kitschy, unusual, and unique calling cards. Next up: Milwaukee's Safe House

Moveable puzzle tiles on a wall in the Safe House’s interior rearrange themselves with the push of a button.

Moveable puzzle tiles on a wall in the Safe House’s interior rearrange themselves with the push of a button.

International spies. Secret missions. Espionage. Codes. Martinis that are shaken, not stirred.

If this all sounds like your idea of a fun Saturday night, head for Milwaukee’s Safe House -- but cover your tracks. The concealed bar and restaurant has been fulfilling patrons’ undercover dreams and serving up Wisconsin favorites like batter-dipped cheese curds since 1966, all under the guise of International Exports, Ltd. Ask a local for the password (you’ll need it after 8 p.m.) and go down an alley and through a nondescript door for a clandestine dining experience.

Once you’ve given the correct password and gained entrance through a secret passage, you'll be met in the Interpol Bar by a truly impressive collection of authentic spy memorabilia gathered by owner, David J. Baldwin over the years. A cell door from an actual KGB prison, a booth that hides diners from sight, and the Unique Martini -- a drink which is shaken (not stirred) by traveling 600 feet around the bar through a pneumatic tube -- are just a few of the distinctive features waiting to be discovered.

Visitors can explore the oak-paneled British Intelligence room and a red Hong Kong-themed section, with bamboo-hung booths modeled on fixtures that Baldwin saw at the Hong Kong Hilton Hotel. Framed James Bond posters line the walls, and signs that point toward “Agent Debriefing,” “CIA Cover Phone,” and other mysterious locations appear around every corner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[VIDEO] Why Shockoe Bottom is Relevant Today

Posted on: January 22nd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

Spotlight_SB_blog

Between 1830 and 1865, Richmond, Virginia's Shockoe Bottom was the second-busiest hub of the American slave trade. The creek bottom that now sits near I-95 hosted auction houses, offices, and slave jails. Solomon Northup, whose memoir inspired the 2013 Oscar-winning film 12 Years a Slave, was held in Shockoe Bottom in 1841.

Since then, much of what was Shockoe Bottom has been lost to time, but the site still stands as a reminder of the suffering and injustice that took place there. It is also a symbol of endurance and resistance.

Today, the site is also threatened by the proposed construction of a minor league baseball stadium and other development.

In September 2014, the National Trust and Preservation Virginia convened local leaders and historians at President Lincoln's Cottage in Washington to discuss the future of Shockoe Bottom. They were asked why Shockoe Bottom is still relevant today, and what they would like to tell the mayor of Richmond about the development plans for the site. Here is what they said.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

@Home: Every Home has a Story

Posted on: June 15th, 2010 by Dolores McDonagh 1 Comment

 

The author in front of her childhood home.  Check out her grown up home (profile name “Cape Heritage”) and others at www.athomenation.org.

The author in front of her childhood home. Check out her grown up home (profile name “Cape Heritage”) and others at www.athomenation.org.

I grew up in the quintessential historic house – a rambling four-square Victorian with six bedrooms that I shared with my parents and eight brothers and sisters. It had tons of nooks and crannies perfect for rainy day games of hide-and-seek, a shuffleboard court inlaid in the basement floor and a teeny, tiny room built around a window seat where I could retreat with a book after school.

Now it wasn’t a showplace, and preservation purists might have fainted at the shade of orange my sister painted the cast iron radiators in our room, but it was a HOME filled with laughter and love and sometimes insanity (think Cheaper by the Dozen reduced by twenty-five percent).

It wasn’t until I turned eleven that I had any clue that our house was “historic.” I was doing a project on the history of my home town, North Attleboro, Mass., and as I turned the pages of a book produced by the local historical society, I came across a picture of MY HOUSE! In a HISTORY BOOK! I can still remember the pride I felt, the sense of importance and of a connection to something bigger than my 5th grade world. I’ll tell you, from that moment, I was a preservationist.

When I talk to other preservationists, including members of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, more often than not their stories mirror mine. Their preservation journeys also began at home , whether they grew up in a New England Victorian, a New York Brownstone or a New Mexican Adobe.

That’s why I’m so excited that the National Trust has officially launched @home – our new website for people who – plain and simple – love their homes. Don’t get me wrong, in the years since that 5th grade history report, I’ve become a real preservation geek – I can talk tax credits and form-based codes with the best of them. But sometimes I think we’ve gotten so technical that we’ve lost touch with the basics that bring people to preservation – those everyday values of home, family, neighborhood, and caring for a good thing instead of throwing it away when it starts to show its age.

So check out www.athomenation.org.

I promise, we won’t tell you what color to paint your house or insist that you be featured in a history book before we consider your home “historic.” We will, on the other hand, let you post pictures to brag about your kitchen renovation, share tips on how to make your home more energy efficient and be inspired by others’ restoration projects. You can also view historic homes for sale, including a few that are crying out to be saved from the wrecking ball.

Come visit – and tell your friends. Every home has a story, and we want to know yours!

Dolores McDonagh is the vice president of membership at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

¿Quién soy yo? Who am I?

Posted on: September 23rd, 2009 by Guest Writer 3 Comments

 

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Written by Anulfo Baez

The January/February issue of Preservation.

The January/February issue of Preservation.

“Who are you?” This question always stirs deep emotions within me, for finding an answer is never easy. The context in which it is asked will result in a different response every time. Our identity is shaped by the groups with which we have become affiliated or with whom we share a common thread. This is problematic as group identities like race and gender roles are socially constructed, forcing individuals who are part of a particular group to take on an identity with which they may or may not identify. The “who are you” question sheds light into the issue of diversity and the cultural nuances that are proving to be a challenge for preservation. The January/February issue of Preservation magazine comes to mind as it is indicative of a much larger cultural issue that must be addressed in the field if it is to become inclusive in preserving everyone’s history.

The magazine highlights the superb preservation work currently underway in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico and showcases the Latino preservation movement in the United States. The message communicated through the use of the word Preservación, however, was ambiguous and did not reflect the positive outlook that the story transmitted. When speaking of preservation in a Latin American context, the word that immediately invokes the ideas of the American preservation movement is conservación. The Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Office translated into Spanish would read “Oficina Estatal de Conservación Histórica (OECH).” The choice of words as a native Spanish speaker do not convey a desire to be more inclusive in preservation, but instead it assumed that those who speak Spanish and English will understand the message behind it. The word Conservación would have taught readers a profound lesson in language and culture, a message that could have broken language barriers.

Cultural diversity is proving to be preservation’s greatest challenge. The preservation field must acknowledge that within the Spanish-speaking community there are a countless of differences in language and cultures.

Historically, preservation has done an outstanding job of preserving those places that matter to people with economic power. Its successes have been driven by those who possess a higher education and are politically savvy, calling attention to a particular resource and garnering the support from the community to save historically significant places from demolition. Unfortunately, not everyone is this privileged. The successes of preservation have also exposed its failures, in that marginalized people who live in the periphery of major urban centers or in cities where industry once employed hundreds of immigrants have now become dilapidated battlegrounds for preservationists.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.