Trust News

Submit Your Local Project for a National Preservation Award

Posted on: March 5th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

Written by Brendan McCormick, Grants & Awards Assistant

Every year the National Trust celebrates the best in preservation by presenting the Richard H. Driehaus National Preservation Awards. In 2012, projects of all shapes and sizes were recognized, ranging from a small historic house museum on Hilton Head Island, SC, to the adaptive use of the 926,000-square-foot 30th Street Main Post Office in Philadelphia, to the almost extra-terrestrial-looking ASM International Headquarters in Materials Park, Ohio.

The National Preservation Awards celebrate not just the physical sites that were saved, but the people whose hard work went into saving that place. They are an opportunity to recognize communities that rally together and refuse to lose one of their local landmarks. Let's revisit some of the award-winners we've profiled recently who illustrate the power of people saving places.

Gullah Museum team. Credit: Butch Hirsch
Gullah Museum team

The Little House’s transformation into the Gullah Museum is proof that no project is too small to be recognized. After a two-year capital campaign and a community-wide restoration effort that included hundreds of volunteer hours, Gullah Museum of Hilton Head Island is a shining example of how a community can join together around preservation and save an important historic resource.

Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building. Credit: Rick Kready/The Pioneer Group
Ribbon-cutting at the renovated Leavenworth 19 building

In Leavenworth, Kansas, another group of local preservationists rallied together to help save Eisenhower Ridge Building 19. The group, Veterans Administration Leavenworth Opportunity for Reuse, or VALOR, worked with the Veterans Administration and other local companies to save the building from demolition. Their efforts resulted in a state-of-the-art office building that brought 400 jobs back to Leavenworth.

Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration. Credit: Susanna Campbell Kuo
Community celebration marking the completion of the Oswego Iron Furnace restoration

In 2003, concerned citizens of Lake Oswego, Oregon, noticed that their historic 1866 blast furnace, the Oswego Iron Furnace, was missing from the renovation plans for their community park. The community banded together and provided over 600 hours of volunteer work and research. Their findings helped convince the local government to fund the restoration of this community landmark.

Do you have a project that deserves recognition? We’d love to hear from you. The nomination deadline is this Friday, March 8.

For the application you will need:

  • A 6,000-character project description that describes the project from start to finish
  • A 4,000-character description of how this project is unique, why it deserves an award, and how it fits the award criteria
  • Up to five (5) supporting documents including brochures or news clippings
  • Up to three (3) letters of recommendation
  • A list of any other awards this project has received in the past
  • Fifteen (15) photos of the project, and a word document with photo captions and photo credits

Before applying, please read the full eligibility requirements and awards descriptions here. A link to the nomination form can be found at the bottom of the page. If you have any questions, please email awards@savingplaces.org.

Good luck!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Tips for Nominating Your Site to America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places List

Posted on: February 12th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Written by Sarah Coquillat, Public Affairs Intern

The National Trust’s America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list for 2013 will be announced this June, and we’ve got good news: There’s still time to nominate your favorite endangered site.

First, a little background. For the past 26 years, the 11 Most list has been one of the most effective tools in the fight to preserve our country’s irreplaceable architectural, cultural, and natural heritage. In the past, the list has spotlighted important places such as Nine Mile Canyon, TWA Terminal at JFK International Airport, and Little Rock Central High School.

Are there historic sites in your community or your state that you think would be good candidates for 11 Most? Then check out our top 10 tips for presenting a strong case when nominating your site. Good luck!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

El Camino Real de Terra Adentro trail sign. Credit: Samat Jain, flickr
El Camino Real de Terra Adentro

The March 1 deadline to nominate a site to the 2013 America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places List is fast approaching. Here at the National Trust, we use this annual list to spotlight threatened historic places from America’s diverse pasts.

In particular, as the Latino population continues to grow, it’s important to recognize the 500 years of Latino historic contributions to this country. Latinos have always been a part of America’s story, from the early Spanish explorers to the accomplishment of the first Latina Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Unfortunately, less than three percent of all the national landmarks that we have -- the highest designation you can receive as a historic landmark -- are about the history of Latinos and other minority groups in the U.S., according to the Department of the Interior. We want to enable America’s diverse communities to see themselves in preservation, and we'll enrich our country by preserving the full range of all American cultural experiences.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Adriana Gallegos

Adriana Gallegos

Adriana Gallegos is the Blogger Outreach Manager working to inform bloggers and online influencers about the National Trust’s mission. In her free time she enjoys spending time with family both in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Burgos, Spain.

National Trust Board Member Susan Chapman Honored on theGrio's 100 List

Posted on: February 5th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Susan Chapman, National Trust Board of Trustee member. Credit: Susan Chapman

We're pleased to share that National Trust Board of Trustees member Susan E. Chapman is one of theGrio's 100, an annual list that shines a light on African-American history makers and industry leaders in a variety of fields who foster change locally and nationally.

Ms. Chapman, who is Senior Vice President, Global Real Estate and Workplace Enablement for American Express in New York, oversees global real estate operations supporting the American Express portfolio of over 65,000 employees in 41 countries. In addition to serving as one of our trustees, she also volunteers on the boards of the Executive Leadership Foundation, Leadership Education and Development (LEAD), and the NYU Schack Institute of Real Estate Advisory Board.

As her listing on theGrio shares, Ms. Chapman is focused on "driving innovation in built environments" and applies her expertise "in solving challenges in low income housing and in preserving sites that help communities to thrive."

We're proud to count her within the preservation movement. Congratulations Susan!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Tell Us How We Can Help You Save Places!

Posted on: January 30th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi

 

Partners in Preservation NYC 2012. Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation

If you're reading this blog post right now, chances are you like saving places as much as we do. But we want to get to know you even better. We want to know why you save places, how you save places, and -- most importantly -- how we at the National Trust can help you do it.

So we've put together a quick and easy survey to find out what you need from us. Our short-term goal? To hear from 250 folks by this Friday, February 1. Our long-term goal? To be the best resource we can be for you in your quest to protect special places in your communities.

Close to 100 of you have already rang in -- thank you! That means only 150 left to go, which is easy as pie with such a passionate group. So if you haven't responded yet, please take a few minutes to share your thoughts via our Facebook survey. (And if you haven't friended us on Facebook yet, now's the perfect time!)

Thank you in advance for telling us more about your preservation goals and dreams. It's helping us help you -- and in turn helping all the places we treasure.

P.S. If you're opting to take the survey on your mobile device, please use this direct link instead. (Smart devices make the Facebook survey hiccup.) Thanks!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.