Trust News

11 Most Endangered Update: H. H. Richardson House Has a New Owner

Posted on: January 18th, 2008 by Preservation magazine

 

H.H. Richardson HouseMore New Orleans than New England, a 204-year-old house with a two-story veranda stands out in suburban Boston. The house at 25 Cottage Street in Brookline, Mass., is not one that a casual observer might link with the work of Henry Hobson Richardson (1838-1886), one of America's most important 19th-century architects. It was in this Federal-style house that Richardson spent the most productive years of his career, from 1874 to his death in 1886, designing masterpieces such as Boston's Trinity Church, which he could see from the house.

After being on the market for seven years, the house found a new owner last month. "I don't like to think what damage the house would incur if it were left unprotected another year," says Allan Galper, chair of the three-year-old Committee to Save the H.H. Richardson House. "We're glad a buyer has been found."

On Dec. 5, the H. H. Richardson Trust bought the property for $2.2 million. "It is an honor to have this opportunity to restore a precious piece of American history," said Michael Minkoff, a spokesman for that trust and owner of Washington, D.C.-based National Development Corp., in a statement. Minkoff has restored historic buildings in New York, Boston, and Washington, D.C., according to the Jan. 10 statement.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Georgia Courthouse Falls

Posted on: January 9th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

Gilmer County Courthouse, Ga.The people have spoken, and a brick courthouse in northern Georgia fell this week.

Built in 1898 as a Hyatt Hotel, the neoclassical building in Ellijay, Ga., was converted to the Gilmer County Courthouse in 1934. The county fire marshall condemned the ailing in 2003, and in November 2006, voters in the county of 28,000 passed a referendum to raze the old courthouse and build a new one.

"Counties that have lost their historic courthouses are always sorry about it afterwards," says Jack Pyburn, FAIA, director of Atlanta-based Lord, Aeck & Sargent's Historic Preservation Studio. "Gilmer County's historic courthouse was unique as Georgia's only courthouse not originally built for that purpose. Fortunately, the overwhelming number of counties in Georgia consider their historic courthouses to be a significant definer of their community's identity, past, present and future."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Smithsonian Seeks New Use for 1881 Arts and Industries Building

Posted on: November 26th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Kim O’Connell photoThe Smithsonian Institution is working to find a new use for its shuttered Arts and Industries Building, built in 1881 and empty since 2004, when an engineering firm's report deemed it a safety hazard.

Earlier this month, the Smithsonian issued a request for qualifications for public or private companies to redevelop the National Historic Landmark, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

In June 2006, the National Trust for Historic Preservation named the High Victorian building designed by Adolph Cluss one of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

DOE Approves Two Power Line Corridors

Posted on: October 18th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Fauquier County, Va.The U.S. Deparment of Energy designated two power line corridors earlier this month, to the dismay of environmentalists and preservationists.

There are 55 national parks and 14 heritage areas within the Mid-Atlantic National Interest Electricity Transmission Corridor (NIETC), which the agency approved on Oct. 2. That area also has African-American historic sites, numerous scenic rivers and byways, and the nation's greatest concentration of Civil War battlefields. The other corridor, the Southwest Area Corridor, passes from Arizona to California.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

No Takers for Little Manila Hotel

Posted on: October 17th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Mariposa HotelAfter spending years trying to save one of the last three original buildings of historic Little Manila in Stockton, Calif., the Little Manila Foundation saw the Mariposa Hotel go to auction on Sept. 12—with no takers.

"No one has bought the building yet, and there are no current potential buyers," says Dillon Delvo, co-founder of the foundation. "Stockton has had a record number of foreclosures this year."

Completed in 1922, the 31-room Renaissance revival hotel served as a meeting place for Filipino laborers, who used the building as headquarters for labor strikes of the 1930s and 40s. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.