Trust News

Notes from New Orleans: Charity Hospital Update

Posted on: July 1st, 2008 by Walter Gallas

 

Contractors examine the limestone cladding of Charity Hospital.The structural assessment of the Charity Hospital building is proceeding at a steady pace. The study, supported by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and under the direction of the Foundation for Historic Louisiana, is a response to the call from Louisiana legislators in a resolution passed in 2006. The mandate was unfunded, and the Foundation has been raising the money to ensure that the effort produces an independent report on the condition of this 1939 Art Deco landmark. I had the opportunity last week to visit the hospital site on Thursday. Sandra Stokes of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana and I were able to go up in the lift with one of the contractors to see how the exterior limestone cladding is attached to the building frame. Final results of the study are scheduled for release on August 21.

Contractors examine the limestone cladding of Charity Hospital.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

2008's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places Announced

Posted on: May 20th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Not surprisingly, we spend a lot of time here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation thinking about threatened sites and how we can play a role in saving them – especially at this time of year, when we announce our annual list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. Budget cuts, deferred maintenance, road construction, and development are among the dangers faced by sites on 2008’s list, which includes California’s State Parks, Charity Hospital and adjacent neighborhood in New Orleans, and New York’s Lower East Side.

The History Channel has prepared a great video, posted below, that describes the places listed this year, and why these places matter. You can also learn more -- and take action -- at the special 2008 11 Most Endangered section of our website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Notes from the Field: Utah's Nine Mile Canyon Under Threat

Posted on: April 18th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Prehistoric rock art at Nine Mile Canyon.Nine Mile Canyon, located northeast of Price, Utah, is under threat from a new project proposed by Bill Barrett Corporation and the Bureau of Land Management that would bring 800 new wells to the plateau above Nine Mile Canyon and dramatically increase the level of traffic within the canyon.

On Wednesday, we went to the canyon, which is renowned for its significant concentration of prehistoric rock art panels that illustrate a wide variety of images, including bighorn sheep, anthromorphs, and various other animals and figures. The Nine Mile Canyon area is also a prime location for the extraction of natural gas. Visitors to the canyon can see evidence of natural gas development in the form of pipelines, a large compressor station, and, perhaps most noticeably, industrial traffic traveling through the canyon to project sites.

While visiting a number of the canyon's significant rock art panels, we witnessed several large tanker trunks driving through the canyon and raising large plumes of dust in their wake. On several occasions, these trucks passed within yards of rock art panels, particularly those located near Nine Mile Canyon's confluence with Gate and Cottonwood Canyons. Increased traffic will present an increased danger to these irreplaceable artifacts.

The National Trust will provide BLM with comments on the proposal by May 1, and we want to encourage people to speak out about the harm that will result from this new development if it is allowed to move forward as planned. More information about the proposed development and how to contact the BLM is available on our main website.

-- Ti Hays and Amy Cole

Ti Hays is the Public Lands Counsel at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Amy Cole is the Senior Program Officer & Regional Attorney for the Trust's Mountains-Plains Office.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Lost: Iowa School

Posted on: February 28th, 2008 by Margaret Foster

 

East Side School, Decorah, IowaThe loss of a majestic 112-year-old school last month has divided a northeastern Iowa town.

"A lot of people are still feeling really hurt here in town," says Jack Hedstrom, chair of the East Side School Development Committee, which fought for years to save the East Side School in Decorah, Iowa. "I wait for the day when people start understanding what they did. I'm sure that day will come."

In a September referendum, 4,000 residents in the town of 8,100 voted on the issue, and 57 percent chose not to lease the Romanesque revival building to Hedstrom's group, which had raised millions for its restoration.

In 2003, the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed the schools as one of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

A panel discussion called “At Risk: 20th Century Urban Design and Architecture” drew at least 150 people to the Ogden Museum of Southern Art this past week. Panel moderator was New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussof. Also participating were Ferrell Guillory, director of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina and a former New Orleans States-Item reporter; Sally Hernandez-Pinero, former chairwoman of the New York City Housing Authority; New Orleans architects Arthur Q. Davis and Ray Manning; and Jack Davis of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The discussion ranged from the threats to Charity Hospital and city school buildings to the loss of St. Frances Cabrini Church, but finally settled primarily on a discussion of the public housing developments. One of the audience members, Rev. Marshall Truehill, put it so eloquently this way: “We need to keep in mind that the buildings have become symbols of what has been distasteful, and rather than deal with the source of the distaste, we’d rather tear down the building.” Jack Davis noted that the city’s penchant for demolition was rooted in the mayor’s need to show progress—of any kind—in an administration short of notable accomplishments. Meanwhile demolition is proceeding on the newer non-historic sections of the B.W. Cooper housing development, and at the C.J. Peete housing development. We’re not sure what’s going on with Lafitte and St. Bernard, so I wrote a letter to the president of the City Council this past Friday asking for information.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.