Trust News

 

In the continuing discussion about the future of Charity Hospital, the firm of RMJM Hillier responded last week to a letter released on October 24 by Angele Davis, Commissioner of Administration for Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. In this Ms. Davis attempts to refute the RMJM Hillier feasibility study commissioned by the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, a partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The Foundation asked RMJM Hillier to address point-by-point the issues raised by Ms. Davis. Click here to see the entire RMJM Hillier response.

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Learn more about our ongoing struggle to save Charity Hospital, one of 2008's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Help Save New Orleans’ Charity Hospital and the Adjacent Mid-City Historic Neighborhood

Posted on: November 4th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 43 Comments

 

Back in May, we listed Charity Hospital and its adjacent Mid-City neighborhood to our annual list of America's 11 Most Endangered Places. The threat is has become even more imminent, and we we need your help. Voice your concerns now to change a potentially disastrous course -- one that would leave this major New Orleans landmark to an uncertain fate, abandon an already-struggling downtown, and destroy at least 18 square blocks of a historic neighborhood.

New Orleans is poised to lose Charity Hospital and the VA Medical Center. The relocation plans of these two institutions call for the needless demolition of more than 165 historic homes  -- at least 18 square blocks -- within the lower Mid-City National Register District. Bulldozing this historic neighborhood would not only betray the residents of New Orleans, who are working so hard to rebuild their communities, but could easily be avoided. The rehabilitation of iconic Charity Hospital, and a nearby alternative site for the VA, would avoid the demolition of even a single historic property.

Please act now to help us prevent the needless destruction of historic and cultural resources triggered by ill-advised and short-sighted planning.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Virtual Roadtrip

Posted on: October 14th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

The National Preservation Conference is just around the corner -- next week, in fact.  Join Jeff and Kelly of Vintage Roadside on Route 66 as they make their way to their exhibit booth at the conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma - they'll drive from Topock, Arizona to Tulsa in five days, blogging about their experiences en route. Their posts will appear in the sidebar of this blog all week as they travel across the Southwest.

Vintage Roadside produces screen printed t-shirts featuring authentic advertising images from mom-and-pop roadside businesses of the 1930s through early 1960s, and donates a portion of their sales to our work here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, where, in 2007, we listed the motels of Route 66 on our annual list of 11 Most Endangered Places.

-- Susan Neumann & Lori Feinman

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Dallas Hotel Sparks Community Conversation

Posted on: September 19th, 2008 by Dolores McDonagh

 

Every morning we get an email called "Preservation in the News" that includes links to news stories that mention the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Since by some act of God my schedule today is actually bereft of meetings, I actually took a few minutes to read the "feed" and came across this story in Unfair Park, the online blog of the Dallas Observer about the Statler Hilton Hotel, listed on this year's 11 Most Endangered list. The story talks about the city's dilemma with the abandoned hotel but what really struck me were the comments made on the story by Dallas residents (Dallas-ians? Dallans? Dallasites?). Reading the comments was a fascinating experience. At first, I felt like an eavesdropper, listening in on a married couple's argument at the next dinner table.  Then, I felt like an urban planning grad student, getting into the past and possible future of a city I'd never visited.

As a preservationist, I wanted to only love the comments from people advocating to save and reuse the Statler and find nothing but buffoonery in those giving other opinions. But I couldn't -- because in almost every comment I found a love of Dallas and a common desire for finding the best future for their downtown and city. And I took encouragement from the fact that even those who weren't advocating preservation weren't accusing preservationists of "blocking progress" -- which I think shows how we're having some success convincing Americans that preservation isn't JUST about preserving the past, but also about helping to define our future.

I will share my favorite comment, even though I'm not sure john's a preservationist:

john k. says:

I only wish downtown were like it was in the 50's. Before the $4.00 mixed drinks. Before the old library closed. Before the Dalls Police Department quit enforcing the traffic laws and let the Constables do it. Before the Internet. Before the tunnel which put most of the daily pedestrians under neath the city. Before the hotels quet having named entertainment in their big rooms. Before, Jack Ruby and Oswald put Dallas on the map as a bad place. Before, when Dalls women needed some time before going to bed with a stranger. We all got to know each other better and loved being here as one of the best places in the United States to live.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Charity Hospital: "New Life for a Cultural Icon"

Posted on: September 12th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 10 Comments

 

RMJM Hillier, an internationally recognized architectural firm, produced a detailed four-minute video, “New Life for a Cultural Icon,” that outlines the history of Charity Hospital, and the feasibility of reusing it to provide high quality, 21st century medical care to residents of New Orleans. The results of RMJM Hillier’s assessment prove that ‘Big Charity’ possesses the infrastructure required to modernize this spectacular 1938 Art Deco Hospital.

This video features a brief history of the hospital, the proposed state-of-the-art improvements for the facility, and a specific vision of how this contemporary hospital would improve the quality of life for people in this unique city.

Richard Moe, President of The National Trust for Historic Preservation said, "this report confirms what we've long believed: Charity Hospital is a viable candidate for rehabilitation and reuse. By rehabbing Charity and preserving the 25 blocks of historic houses around it, New Orleans can get two things it desperately needs: top-quality medical facilities and livable in-town neighborhoods."

Emily Courtney, National trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.