Trust News

 

This week is what I refer to annually as the Week of Lists.

From magazines to the Internet, the outgoing year is relived in every imaginable category. In addition to Time's People of the Year, I've read about 2008's highest-grossing movies, most outrageous Hollywood moments (a perennial favorite of mine), biggest YouTube videos, top-earning business tycoons, most memorable campaign gaffes, hottest food trends, most prolific buzzwords (change!) and best television advertisements.

Talk about a whole lot of nothing, huh?

Today, as we make big plans to celebrate an even bigger night, there are residents in Lower Mid-City New Orleans who are making the kind of plans most of us will never be faced with in our lifetimes: where am I going to go if my house gets demolished?

While the fate of this historic neighborhood is still painfully unclear, we wanted to use today to look back at 2008 as a year that saw the residents of Lower Mid-City - and their many advocates from New Orleans to Washington, D.C. - come together to fight for what's fair, right and responsible. So, in between reading about the year's biggest breakups and worst-dressed A-listers, please take a moment to read our special year-end list, What We Would Miss About Lower Mid-City.

Unlike the others, it won't rot your brain, but touch your heart. And when you're done, consider taking a moment to make a difference by telling a friend about our Mid-City website, sending a letter or posting a video on Facebook.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

A Preservation Newbie's Walk Through Mid-City New Orleans

Posted on: December 23rd, 2008 by Jason Clement

 

I have a confession to make: I'm a preservation newbie.

That's right; I'm not an architect, an archeologist, an urban planner or a historian. I don't totally understand tax credits (yet!) or Section 106 (workin' on it!). And unless time logged vegging out in front of HGTV counts, I've also never restored original moulding or weatherized a window.

I am, in all honesty, a twenty-six-year-old writer turned web geek who simply tends to follow his heart a lot. Three months ago, it led me to my first day at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and just one week ago, it led me to Palmyra Street in New Orleans.

A Louisiana native, I was home mainly to see family, though I knew I would have a few hours of downtime between eating and eating again (it's what us Cajuns do best). Now, if you've ever been to New Orleans, you know firsthand how a "few hours of downtime" can lead you in so many very interesting directions. I won't elaborate, but let me say that this trip was no exception: I found myself walking the streets of Mid-City, a place that's seemingly worlds away from the French Quarter and a neighborhood that I had previously never been to.

Since starting at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, I had heard a lot about Charity Hospital and the surrounding area. I had read reports, looked at photos and worked on projects supporting our work. None of it, however, prepared me for what I felt on foot as my first-timer curiosity slowly turned into unabated anger. I saw Christmas lights, "I'm Home!" signs, toys in yards, fresh paint jobs, and new and ongoing restoration projects. And the more I looked around and saw these things, the more I realized what I was really witnessing: people making the most out of a life in which nonnegotiable decisions about what stays and what goes are ultimately being made in boardrooms.

As a newbie, I still don't completely understand the "how" or the "why" of the Mid-City story. I just know that my heart wants to go back and do more because the people I saw there might be ringing in the new year by watching their homes get torn down. To me, that chilling mental image is stronger than any talking point, any report and any study.

So, at a time when it seems like none of the decision makers are, I want to ask everyone here to please think with your heart. I invite you to follow me on my walking tour of Mid-City and then encourage you to tell a friend about our Mid-City website, send a letter or post a video on Facebook.

We don't have a lot of time, but even a newbie knows that there is still work that can be done - even if it is just with a mouse.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 

Kevin Krause came to New Orleans as an Americorps volunteer after Hurricane Katrina. He spent a year helping people restore their homes and eventually, he and his wife bought one for themselves. When it comes to the idea of losing his home to the new VA/LSU hospital complex he says, "It's depressing. It's... criminal." Kevin finds particularly unfortunate the government's belief that Mid-City is anything other than blighted buildings -- "they refuse to see the people who live in this neighborhood."

Kevin's video ends with a plea: "We’re sending out an SOS to anyone who can hear us. We need help and we need it now."

You can help --  take action today!

Learn more about our efforts to save Mid-City New Orleans.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

As BLM Lease Sale Looms, Advocates Press to Save Nine Mile Canyon and Other Public Lands from Drilling

Posted on: December 18th, 2008 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

An example of the Native American rock art in Nine Mile Canyon.

An example of the Native American rock art in Nine Mile Canyon.

Yesterday, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and a coalition of environmental groups joined actor Robert Redford and Congressman Brian Baird (D-Wash.) in a press conference organized by environmental, historic preservation and business groups who oppose a controversial oil and gas lease sale set for December 19th. Several parcels included in this sale are on relatively pristine lands near Nine Mile Canyon, which the Bureau of Land Management acknowledges has the highest concentration of Native American rock art in the United States.

Dave Albersworth (The Wilderness Society), Pat Mitchell (Grand Canyon Trust), and Ti Hays (National Trust for Historic Preservation) listen to Robert Redford speak.

Dave Albersworth (The Wilderness Society), Pat Mitchell (Grand Canyon Trust), and Ti Hays (National Trust for Historic Preservation) listen to Robert Redford.

Redford spoke reverently of the Utah wild lands endangered by the proposed leasing and sharply rebuked BLM’s decision to go forward with the sale. He at one point referred to the decision makers with BLM as “morally criminal.” Rep. Baird, who grew up in Fruita, Colorado, just a few miles from the Utah border, also spoke fondly of his time among the canyons for which so many cherish the Utah public lands. He rightly reminded the audience that although the lease sale involves land within the State of Utah, the land is owned and managed by the federal government on behalf of the American people. In light of the national interest in protecting the cultural and natural resources affected by the proposed leases, he called on BLM to cancel the sale.

Also yesterday, the National Trust -- along with many of the groups that held the press conference -- filed a complaint in federal court challenging the lease sale scheduled for December 19th. The complaint claims that, in deciding to sell additional leases near Nine Mile Canyon, BLM has failed to consult and adequately assess effects on historic properties under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. The complaint also alleges violations of the National Environmental Policy Act and Federal Land Policy and Management Act.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Save Mid-City: "How Would You Feel?" – Resident Diana Monley

Posted on: December 17th, 2008 by Sarah Heffern

 

Diana Monely has worked for the city of New Orleans for 30 years and lived in her Mid-City home for 35, and now -- despite weathering Hurricane Katrina in the city to remain on the job -- her loyalty to New Orleans is being repaid with the loss of her home. She says, “You just put yourself in my place. How would you feel?”

I, for one, would feel terrible, especially knowing that there are so many unanswered questions and unconsidered alternatives when it comes to locating a new VA/LSU medical complex in Mid-City. Join us in telling Governor Bobby Jindal and other decisionmakers how you feel about this. Take action today!

Learn more about our efforts to save Mid-City New Orleans.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.