Trust News

 

Chautauqua Amphitheater Stephen davies 1

Since it opened as a Sunday School in 1875, the Chautauqua Institution has helped spark and sustain a broader movement in education, culture, and spirituality in communities throughout the country. Today, this 750-acre education center on the shores of western New York’s Lake Chautauqua continues to serve as a summertime retreat and intellectual, spiritual, and cultural wellspring.

At the institution’s center is the 1893 Chautauqua Amphitheater, a 4,000-seat, roofed, open air structure internationally recognized as a forum for American culture and history. Its wooden stage has hosted Franklin D. Roosevelt, Susan B. Anthony, Thurgood Marshall, Bobby Kennedy, Ella Fitzgerald, Amelia Earhart, Booker T. Washington, Bill and Hilary Clinton, and Sandra Day O’Connor, to name just a few.

But the building is in jeopardy. Despite a recent delay in the Chautauqua Institution’s decision-making process, there is a chance “the Amp” -- as it’s affectionately known -- may be replaced by a replica structure. In an effort to save the Amp, the National Trust has chosen it as our newest National Treasure.

To get a better sense of just how important the Chautauqua Amphitheater’s survival is, I spoke with Vanity Fair architecture critic and National Trust board member, Paul Goldberger.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Photos] Nashville’s Music Row: Keeping the Beat

Posted on: January 26th, 2015 by David Weible

 

The National Trust has picked up in 2015 where it left off in 2014 and we're looking forward to another year of saving some of America's most important historic places. Read on for a peek at one of the Trust's newest National Treasures.

(You can also view the Music Row story on Exposure.)


Nashville's Music Row by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Big Win: Manhattan Project National Historical Park Established!

Posted on: December 15th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 11 Comments

 

Written by Nancy Tinker, Senior Field Officer, and Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

Manhattan_Completed

Big news on the National Treasure front -- the Manhattan Project National Historical Park Act was passed in the National Defense Authorization Act of 2015 on Friday, December 12, 2014.

With this action, Congress has authorized the establishment of a new National Park commemorating the history of the Manhattan Project. Comprised of the three laboratories whose work was dedicated to accomplishing the Manhattan Project’s mission, the new national park will include historic resources located in Los Alamos, New Mexico; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Hanford, Washington. As laboratories located in each site furthered Manhattan Project goals, each location will spotlight specific resources that were critical to this era in American history. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Hope for the Future: Why We’re Thankful for You in Preservation

Posted on: November 27th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

We've had an incredible year here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and we have much to be thankful for -- namely, you! Thanks to passionate preservationists like you who contribute to our efforts, we're able to continue saving America's historic places in communities around the country -- and the results are moving.

So take a minute this Thanksgiving to check out three remarkable stories that showcase the very best qualities of the preservation movement: its energy, its hope, and its people.


HOPE FOR THE FUTURE by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

From our community to yours, Happy Thanksgiving!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Cincinnati’s Union Terminal Now Saved for Future Generations

Posted on: November 5th, 2014 by David Weible 19 Comments

 

Built in 1933, Union Terminal is one of the most iconic Art Deco masterpieces in the United States. It now houses the Cincinnati Museum Center, the largest cultural institution in the region.
Built in 1933, Union Terminal is one of the most iconic Art Deco masterpieces in the United States. It now houses the Cincinnati Museum Center, the largest cultural institution in the region.

Since it opened in 1933, Union Terminal has served as both a cultural hub for the city of Cincinnati and one of the most iconic Art Deco structures in the nation. Now, thanks to local citizens who voted "yes" on Issue 8, it will continue to fill both roles for generations to come.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Widening the Preservation Lens

Posted on: October 30th, 2014 by Stephanie Meeks 4 Comments

 

141030_blog-photo_hampton_composite
Left: Stephanie Meeks, speaking to architecture students at Hampton University about the need to preserve more historic places that represent the diverse history of our nation. Right: Stephanie Meeks and Germonique Ulmer, vice president of Public Affairs, at the Emancipation Oak on Hampton University's campus.

On a recent visit to Hampton University, one of our nation’s oldest and most esteemed historically black universities, I took part in a fascinating conversation with architecture students about what preservation means to them, and how we can work together to ensure the places we save reflect the diverse stories of all Americans.

We began our discussion with a visualization exercise. Take a moment to picture a place that matters to you. It may be your home, a park, a church, a school. What has it meant to your life? Does it connect you to your community? What does it say about who you are?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.